Bibliography_part4b_test

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Catching the First Principle’, on the first morning, 11.04.1977.
“Yes. The first principle cannot be said. The most important thing cannot be said, and that which can be said will not be the first principle. The moment truth is uttered it becomes a lie; the very utterance is a falsification. So the Vedas, the Bible, and the Koran, they contain the second principle, not the first principle. They contain lies, not the truth, because the truth cannot be contained by any word whatsoever. The truth can only be experienced – the truth can be lived – but there is no way to say it.
The word is a far, faraway echo of the real experience; and it is so far away from the real that it is even worse than the unreal because it can give you a false confidence. It can give you a false promise. If you start believing in some dogma, you will go on missing the truth. Truth has to be known by experience. No belief can help you on the way; all beliefs are barriers.
All religions are against religion – it has to be so by the very nature of things. All churches are against God. Churches exist because they fulfill a certain need. The need is: man does not want to make any efforts; he wants easy shortcuts. Belief is an easy shortcut.” (p. 4)

In the last discourse in this series, ‘You: The Greatest Lie There Is’ on 19.04.1977, (last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 20.04.1977), Osho tells the story of the goose in the bottle, and he finishes with the words:
“A disciple of His Divine Grace Prabhupad came to see me. Prabhupad is the founder of the Krishna Consciousness movement. Naturally, to be respectful to me, he also called me His Divine Grace. I said, “Don’t call me that; just call me ‘His Divine Ordinariness’.”
The ordinary is the extraordinary. The ordinary has not to be destroyed. Once the ordinary is in the service of the extraordinary it is beautiful, it is tremendously beautiful.
Let me repeat: the trivial is the profound, samsara is nirvana. Whatsoever you are, there is nothing wrong with it. Just something is missing. Nothing wrong with it! Something is simply missing. Just that missing link has to be provided, that plus, and everything that you have becomes divine.
Love has not to be destroyed; only awareness has to be added to it. Relationship has not to be destroyed; only meditation has to be added to it. You need not go from the marketplace, you need not go to any cave and in the Himalayas; only God has to be called there in the marketplace…
But if you cannot get out of the house, then something is wrong. There is no need to leave the house, there is no need to drop being a householder. There is only one thing needed: in the house become a sannyasin, in the world remain in such a way that the world is not in you.
See, the goose is out. In fact, the goose has always been out, just a recognition is needed.” (p. 318)

* The Tantra Vision. Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Speaking on the Royal Song of Saraha. Volume 1 of 2. Editor and Compiler: Ma Yoga Anurag. Introduction: Sw Anand Rajen. Design: Sw Anand Subhadra. Cover Design: Sw Govinddas. Photosetting: Spads Phototype Setting Industries (P) Ltd. Bombay. Printing: Army and Navy Press. Bombay. Binding: Four Ocean Publishers Pvt. Ltd. Bombay. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, December 1978. First Edition. 326 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 655 g. No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 21.04am – 30.04am 1977. 10 discourses. Subject: Tantra. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Translations. Foreign Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
In colophon: “Acknowledgement is given to ‘The Royal Song of Saraha’ by H.V. Guenther University of Washington Press 1969 for the sutras quoted in this book.”
On back flap: “In these discourses, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh offers, with a magnificent simplicity and a fascinating clarity, the only answer to our questions. He clarifies all that we always wanted to know about sex; he clarifies all that we could never understand, even had we dared ask about it. Surely, it will take time, if ever, for such a thinker to be born again – a thinker so free from the conditionings of an era and a country.
He proposes a radical change in the predominant attitude towards sex, but his sexual revolution does not mean a swinging from sexual deprivation to sexual indulgence. For him – contrary to the Hebraic-Christian dualism which has divided the world into divine and evil and has created unsolvable paradoxes – Tantric love is sacred, and the body is a temple continuously to be hallowed. Tantra is not an intellectual proposal, but an experience which can be lived only in receptivity and vulnerability. The language of the Master is a language of love, and the disciple only learns if he loves. The best introduction to him is an invitation to silence. Serena Nozzoli (from ‘Arrendersi al Tutto’).”

Introduction by Sw Anand Rajen, dated November 1977. Excerpts:
“It is ‘Hindi month’. That is, Bhagwan’s daily discourses are delivered in Hindi. Next month, as every alternate month, they will be in English. Like many of his Western sannyasins – disciples – half past seven in the morning finds me entering Chuang Tzu auditorium and taking my place on the marble floor; the fact that He will be speaking a language for which I don’t even know the words ‘yes’ and ‘no’ is irrelevant. When He speaks in English – as you’ll find reading this book – He takes your mind for intoxicating joy-rides along His illuminated paths, through insights, paradoxes, absurdities and arguments. In fact, if your own pride and knowledge gets in the way too much, you’ll throw the book down – exasperatedly, pompously, or with cool detachment, depending on how you like doing it. Whichever way is to miss; to miss the point and to miss the experience of just letting Him in, of suspending your own inner voice…
I want to tell you something about reading this book; about Bhagwan, about you, about me. I want to tell you how dangerous this book is, and that’s really to say how much more dangerous Bhagwan is. After all, here you have only his words; and to give you an example of his paradoxy, “I am not talking to you. I have nothing to say, because that which I have cannot be said.” Yet for an hour and a half every morning He talks, and as I said, when it’s English, unless your mind has only come to argue, his words are entrancing. Even those who come to argue find themselves so very often giving up the fight and falling in love with Him. That’s why He’s so dangerous; because the next thing you know your clothes have turned orange, you wear His mala round your neck, and your name has changed to something mythically Indian. But most of all, everything you thought you knew, and were, and understood, has evaporated or lies utterly useless in the junk-room of your being, because you’ve just discovered, irrevocably and outrageously, that it’s all rubbish anyway: that all your life, through no fault of your own, you’ve been missing out on life!
If this makes Bhagwan sound like a hedonist… well, He says it of Himself; but not a material hedonist. He’s a spiritual hedonist; He lives in bliss and with no choice left pours His love over us.
Eight a.m. A door opens, a ripple runs through the silence of the crowded auditorium as everyone’s awareness moves like a soft wave towards the white-clad figure who emerges, His hands together in prayerful welcome. Our hands offer the same greeting, and before He sits, He casts silent benediction over us with His indescribable smile. His gaze says Satchitanand – Being, Consciousness, Bliss. Sometimes when He enters I feel not very present – agitated, distracted and stubbornly unresponsive to the inner tap – but today I’m feeling easy, available, open. As He begins speaking my awareness feels uplifted, buoyant, floating; thoughts are no more than wispy clouds, body is just there, flowing to its own rhythm, the soft shock of ‘seeing’ happens again. Life’s heartbeat, timeless pulsation… This being is always Here! Whatever His words mean, I know He is one with what He is saying, His voice, expression, and gesturing hand playing for us the Song of the Present. Effortlessly, He is Here – The Master, persuading us through His love, His bliss, His wisdom, to disappear with Him into the Present. And the awesome revelation, available any, any moment you dare to experience it, is His silence! The talking, the gesturing, the intimacy, the insights, are a dance emanating from an ever-present, ever-seeing silence. He is inviting us towards emptiness – to become the hollow bamboo through which God blows…
“Aaj itana hi – Enough for today,” He says gently, as He brings His hands together and rises to His feet. I feel His love, His energy radiating, and the warmth in me of loving Him, and the love of all around happening. As He leaves, our separateness returns, with a kind of grace. I sit for a minute, just feeling it all going on within and without. Standing, my legs wobble a bit. I stretch and stroll off, feeling easy, alive, happy. It doesn’t matter that I’m only a flicker of consciousness. What matters is the astonishing blessing of His presence herenow, and the awesome truth within His words, within you, within me. Enjoy Him!” (p. 1)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘One Whose Arrow Is Shot’, on the first morning, 21.04.1977.
“Gautam the Buddha is the greatest master who has ever walked on the earth. Christ is a great Master, so is Krishna, so is Mahavir, so is Mohammed, and many more – but Buddha still remains the greatest Master. Not that his achievement of Enlightenment is neither less nor more – he has attained to the same quality of consciousness as Mahavir, as Christ, as Zarathustra, as Lao Tzu.
There is no question of any Enlightened man being more Enlightened than anybody else. But as far as his being a Master is concerned, Buddha is incomparable – because, through him, thousands of people have attained to Enlightenment. It has never happened with any other Master. His line has been the most fruitful line. His family has been the most creative family up to now. He is like a big tree with so many branches – and each branch has been fruitful: each branches is loaded with fruits.” (p. 5)

The last discourse in this series, ‘Mind Immaculate In Its Very Being’, on 29.04.1977, (last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 30.04.1977), tells us about Buddha leaving his palace and finishes with the words:
“Buddha looked back at that marble palace and he said, “I see there only fire and nothing else, a raging fire. The whole world is burning with fire – and I am not renouncing it because there is nothing to renounce in it. I am trying just to escape from the fire. No, I don’t see any palace! and I don’t see any joy there.”
Saraha says to the king:
Into a raging fire he walks with open eyes –
Who could be more deserving of compassion?
You think, sir, you have come because of compassion to help me? No, the situation is just the reverse: I feel compassion for you – you are living in a raging fire. Beware! Be alert! Be awake! and get out of it as soon as possible, because all that is beautiful, all that is truthful, all that is good, is known and experienced only through the no-mind.
Tantra is a process of creating no-mind in you. No-mind is the door of Nirvana.” (p. 280)

* The Tantra Vision. Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Speaking on the Royal Song of Saraha. Volume 2 of 2. Editor: Ma Prem Asha. Compilation: Ma Yoga Rabiya. Introduction: Ma Prem Asha. Design: Sw Anand Subhadra. Sw Govind Vedant. Cover Design: Sw Govinddas. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Phototypesetting: Spads Phototype Setting Industries (P) Ltd. Worli. Bombay. Processing: Com Art Lithographers Pvt Ltd. Bombay. Printing: Electrographic Industries. Worli. Bombay. Binding: Swan Binders. Wadala. Bombay. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, March 1979. First Edition. 331 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 660 g. No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 01.05am – 10.05am 1977. 10 discourses. Subject: Zen. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Darshan Diaries.Translations. Foreign Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
Printed in brownish font.
In colophon: “Grateful acknowledgement is given to H.U. Guentheil for the sutras ‘The Royal Song of Sahara’ University of Washington Press quoted in this book.”
On front flap: “This Tantra vision is one of the greatest visions ever dreamt by man… a religion which does not destroy the individual but respects individuality tremendously.
It is an individual approach towards reality. It is a vision to turn you on, to turn you in and to turn you beyond.
Tantra means expansion. This is the state when you have expanded to the uttermost. Your boundaries and the boundaries of existence are no longer separate, they are the same. Less than that will not satisfy.
When you become all, when you become one with all, when you are as huge as this universe, when you contain all – when stars start moving within you and the earths are born in you and disappear – when you have this cosmic expansion, then the work is finished. You have come home. This is the goal of Tantra.”
On back flap: “Again and again one senses something echoing from these words – something that is beyond even wisdom and compassion, as if these were not enough. There seems a presence here that simply knows. Knows us, knows the fabric of our lives, sees clearly both the splendor and despair of our Western ways; and appears to summon us – not to something different but to something more…
I cannot tell just who it is coming our way in these pages, but one dares to feel that the footstep has not been heard too often in these parts. Perhaps incomparable.” Arthur Sherman, M.S., M.D., Psychiatrist; Former Fellow, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York; Contributing Author, “Reflections of Mind”.
“…a true master…fabulous knowledge… enormous powers of speech… unconventional approach…” Herman Labruyére. Prana, 1978. (Holland)

Introduction by Ma Prem Asha:
“Tantra has long been regarded as either a system of sexual calisthenics or else as an erudite gobbledygook that has required patience and scholarship beyond the capacity of the ordinary man.
Both are myths.
The Tantra of Saraha, the Tantra of Bhagwan is alive, is real. In these discourses, Bhagwan speaks of a vision – a vision of a life lived in total freedom, a life of loving with no bounds, with no limit – not as an ideal, but as actual and ever-present experience. What is within these pages is the re-echoing of an invitation issued from the heart of existence itself – no ‘way’, no theory, no system – just a call.
‘The day I knew my own self, I knew the very self of existence. Look at me! I am here. It is here.
I have no philosophy, I have a certain experience. I can share that experience with you, but the sharing cannot be just from my side. You will have to move from your dogmatic standpoint. You will have to come with me into the unknown.
I can take you to that window from which existence is clear, transparent. But you will have to hold my hand and come…'”

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘The Tantra Map’, on the first morning, 01.05.1977.
“Tantra is freedom: freedom from all mind-constructs, from all mind-games; freedom from all structures; freedom from the other. Tantra is a space to be. Tantra is liberation.
Tantra is not a religion in the ordinary sense – religion again is a mind game; religion gives you a certain pattern. A Christian has a certain pattern so has the Hindu, so has the Muslim. Religion gives you a certain style, a discipline. Tantra takes all disciplines away.
When there is no discipline, when there is no enforced order, a totally different kind of order arises in you. What Lao Tzu calls Tao, what Buddha calls dharma – that arises in you. That is not anything done by you; it happens to you. Tantra simply creates space for it to happen. It does not even invite, it does not wait; it simply creates a space. And when the space is ready, the whole flows in.” (p. 3)

The last discourse in this series, ‘No-mind Is The Door’, on 09.05.1977, (last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 10.05.1977), finishes with the words:
“Saraha is propounding Buddha’s greatest insight. Buddha says: There is no substance and there is no self. Substance is not there; all is empty. And the self is not inside you, there also it is all empty. To come to see this emptiness… awareness floating in emptiness – pure awareness, unbounded awareness… This awareness is emptiness itself, or this emptiness is awareness itself. This emptiness is luminous with awareness, full of awareness.
Tantra is a great insight into things as they really are. But remember, finally, it is not a philosophy, it is an insight. And if you want to go into it, you will have to go, not through the mind, but without the mind.
No-mind is the door to Tantra. Non-thinking is the way to Tantra. Experiencing is the key to Tantra.” (p. 289)

* Zen. The Path of Paradox. Talks on Zen Stories. Volume 1 of 3. Editor and Compiler: Ma Prema Veena. Introduction: Ma Sagarpriya. Design: Sw Prem Deekshant. Printing: Arun K. Mehta at Vakil & Sons Ltd. Vakils House, 18 Ballard Estate, Bombay 400 038. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, December 1978. First Edition. 362 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 680 g. ISBN 0-88050-188-X (label). 5000 copies. Period: 11.06am – 20.06am 1977. 10 discourses. Subject: Zen. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, including forthcoming books 1979. Darshan Diaries. Translations. Foreign Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
In colophon: “We acknowledge the use of stories from ‘The World of Zen’ by N.W. Ross.”
On front flap: “Zen: The Path of Paradox. Bhagwan says, “Had Friederich Nietzsche known anything about Zen he might have turned into a mystic rather than going mad.” But possibly more relevant would be to say, ‘had he known Zen through Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh…..’
Zen Buddhism is now so popular amongst intellectuals, especially in the States, yet remains such a brain teaser. Rather than enlightening people, it’s far more likely to mystify the world we live in even more! I suspect many have been driven still further up the wall by so-called zen masters.
Paradoxes are irrational and deathly to the mind. While we continue to dissect and analyse, we’ll only become more and more neurotic.
“A Zen master used to say, ‘It is clear and so it is hard to see’. A dunce once searched for a fire with a lighted lantern. Had he known what fire was, he would have cooked his rice much sooner.”
Continued on back flap: “Zen is such a dry path it needs the juice of a master like Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh to bring it to life, in his own humorous and loving way. His words are there to engage your mind so that the boundaries existing only in the mind dissolve and you relax and let go into the way things really are. Bhagwan’s presence is sanity itself.
He is like manna from heaven; tasting like your favourite food! Not only is he the Zen Master, he transforms into a Jesus, a Sufi mystic, a Jewish rabbi, a rishi or others, depending on your point of view. He talks around texts from all religious sources – and in our ashram are meditations, therapies and healings from all the magical corners of the world; what’s more, they have been freed from their traditional ritual which can be so meaningless to us, so we may enjoy their essential alchemy.” Ma Prem Pradeepa.

Introduction by Ma Sagarpriya:
“Living, breathing Zen. That’s what Bhagwan is for me….
I heard these ten lectures originally. Now as I read them again, I am stuck by how the content escapes me. Something else is grabbing all my attention. It is his being, his quality. The sensation of his presence far outweights the sensation of his words on my mental ear. So the word is forgotten, and the non-word is remembered, absorbed. This is so like a Zen painting: the tree is forgotten but the empty sky shocks one’s being; one is awed by the power of nothingness….
Bhagwan speaks not in order to convey a message but in order to be with me, in a way where my mind will be comfortably occupied. So what I hear is his silence. What I notice is the beauty of speech which flows through him unrehearsed, unplanned, unimpeded by desire or preference. What I feel is “now”, “this”, “here”. A breeze is carrying the rhythm of his being to me, and I dance with him very, very silently. It is a feeling of being a leaf in the wind: dancing happens without any effort whatsoever on my part.
So, in the end, it is my own dance I remember – or our dance together, our oneness. I remember my openness, my contentment, my feeling of coming home, of saying yes, or being happy. For me, this is the “suchness” of Zen. I accept Bhagwan as an authority on Zen not because he knows ‘about’ it but because for me he embodies its quality. He exudes its fragrance. He is that very space full of grace to which it points.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Join The Farthest Star’, on the first morning, 11.06.1977.
“First a few fundamentals….
Zen is not a theology, it is a religion – and religion without a theology is a unique phenomenon. All other religions exist around the concept of God. They have theologies. They are God-centric not man-centric; man is not the end, God is the end. But not so for Zen. For Zen, man is the goal, man is the end unto himself. God is not something above humanity, God is something hidden within humanity. Man is carrying God in himself as a potentiality.
So there is no concept of God in Zen. If you want you can say that it is not even a religion – because how can there be a religion without the concept of God? Certainly those who have been brought up as Christians, Mohammedans, Hindus, Jews, cannot conceive of what sort of religion Zen is. If there is no God then it becomes atheism. It is not. It is theism to the very core – but without a God.
This is the first fundamental to be understood. Let it sink deep within you, then things will become clear.” (p. 5)

The last discourse in this series, ‘Symbols of the Tiredness of Man’ on 19.06.1977, (last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 20.06.1977), finishes with the words:
“I have heard…
When a monk asked Hui Neng, “How to attain to Buddhahood, sir?’ he gave him a sound beating saying, ‘If I don’t beat you the world will laugh at me.’
What does he mean, this Hui Neng? He is saying, ‘The very effort that you want to attain Buddhahood is foolish because you are a Buddha. If I don’t beat you the people will laugh at me – at least those who know, they will laugh. I cannot help you to become a Buddha. You are already a Buddha.’
You are already that which you are seeking – hence the laughter.
Meditate on this small parable. It is of tremendous significance. And work hard, drill hard into the mind, so that one day you can deserve the kick.” (p. 31

* Zen. The Path of Paradox. Talks on Zen Stories. Volume 2 of 3. Editor and Compiler: Ma Ananda Vandana. Introduction: Ma Ananda Vandana. Design: Sw Govinddas. Processing: Com. Art Lithographers Pvt Ltd. Bombay. Rajneesh Fondation Ltd. Poona. Printing: Usha Offset Printers. Bombay. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, March 1979. First Edition. 356 pages. Illustrated with photos from darshans. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 g. Weight: 735 g. No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 21.06am – 30.06am 1977. 10 discourses. Subject: Zen. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Translations. Foreign Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
In colophon: “Acknowledgement is given to: ‘The World of Zen: An East-West Anthology’ by Nancy Wilson Ross, Random House, 1960. ‘Zen Flesh, Zen Bones’ by Paul Reps, The Charles E. Tuttle Co, 1957. ‘Buddhist Texts Through the Ages’ edited by Conze, Horner, Snellgrove & Waley, Bruno Cassirer Ltd. for the stories quoted in this book.”

Introduction by Ma Ananda Vandana. Excerpt:
“I have to look back to get any sense at all of the incredible changes that happens just being around you. This morning walking down MG Road, striding seven feet tall, radiant magnificent joyous strong, blazing energy after sitting in your presence. Morning discourse, the daily dose of ecstasy food for the day. This morning I listen to you talk in Hindi and I am on fire and I love you with a fevered passion and intensity which sears my soul and bursts my brain and Bhagwan, I don’t know anything. I don’t know what meditation is, I don’t remember how I used to think I was watching my thoughts and slowing the mind, and I don’t care. I am crazy about you, wild about you, and I want you, want you… Bhagwan, who are you?
You keep doing it. I keep getting to places, spaces, which are so beyond anything I’ve ever known, and I think, ‘This is it’ – and I’m secretly waiting for the big satori any moment. Like the other day I walked out of the train station in Bombay just brimming over with this feeling of you and my scalp was tingling and my heart pounding and I thought, ‘Hope I don’t have a satori right here on the street alone in Bombay…’!
These feelings keep coming, that ‘This is more than I can possibly contain, there can’t be more than this.’ I am streaming flowing exploding with fire and love and life… and without doing anything or saying a word in any tangible visible audible way, you slide the ground from under me and it all changes and I don’t know where I am or what is happening or to whom.”

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Hey! Wait A Minute’, on the first morning, 21.06.1977.
“Jesus says, ‘Judge ye not.’ This was perfect Zen, had he stopped there. But maybe because he was talking to the jews and he had to talk in a Jewish way, he added,’… so that ye are not judged.’ Now it is no more Zen. Now it is a bargain. That addition destroyed its very quality, its very depth.
‘Judge ye not’ is enough unto itself; nothing is needed to be added to it. ‘Judge ye not’ means ‘Be non-judgemental.’ Judge ye not means ‘Look at life without any valuation.’ Don’t evaluate – don’t say ‘this is good’ and don’t say ‘this is bad’. Don’t be moral – don’t call something divine, and don’t call something evil. ‘Judge ye not’ is a great statement that there is no God and no Devil.
Had Jesus stopped there, this small saying – only three words, ‘judge ye not’ – would have transformed the whole character of Christianity. But he added something and destroyed it. He said, ‘…so that ye are not judged.’ Now it becomes conditional. Now it is no more non-judgemental, it is a simple bargain – ‘so that ye are not judged.’ It is business-like.” (p. 1)

The last discourse in this series, ‘Scratching The Shoe’, on 29.06.1977, finishes with the words:
“The moment you stop desiring, it is there. But sometimes you stop desiring and it is not there. For example, in deep sleep – you desire no more, but it is not there. You need a cup of tea. In deep sleep you don’t desire, you don’t think of money – not even dreams are there. All has stopped, the mind has halted, but still you don’t attain Buddhahood. Why? In deep sleep you become a Buddha every night. But you miss, because at that time you are not aware.
So go to the back, and have a cup of tea. And don’t ask what enlightenment is, and don’t ask how to attain it, and don’t ask for the methods and the technology and the philosophy.
‘What’s all this?’ The master says it is all nonsense. Saying this, he then got down and departed. His sermon is finished. The shortest sermon – but one of the most penetrating.
Now don’t start thinking about it! Now don’t start thinking about it, otherwise you will miss the message. Go to the back, and have a cup of tea.” (p. 304)

In the very last discourse, ‘The Bridge But Not The Water Flows’, on 30.06.1977, Osho answers a question ‘Why is Zen called the path of paradox?’ He quotes T.S. Elliot and finishes with the words:
“In order to arrive at what you do not know
You must go by a way which is the way of ignorance.
In order to possess what you do not possess
You must go by the way of dispossession.
In order to arrive at what you are not
You must go through the way in which you are not.
And what you do not know is the only thing you know
And what you own is what you don’t own
And where you are is where you are not.
These lines are perfect Zen, pure Zen. Meditate over these lines, find out what T.S. Elliot means. These are very profound. It can be a koan for you….
Have you watched it? Where are you? People are in their bodies – there you are not. People are in their minds – and there you are not. Your reality is somewhere else beyond the body and behind the mind.
Meditate over these lines.
All profound truths are paradoxical. Hence I call Zen the path of paradox.” (p. 340)

* Zen. The Path of Paradox. Talks on Zen. Volume 3 of 3. Editor and Compiler: Ma Yoga Anurag. Introduction: Ma Anand Mallika. Design: Sw Govinddas. Photography: Ma Prem Champa. Sw Krishna Bharti. Processing: Rajneesh Foundation Limited and Com Art Lithographers Pvt. Ltd. Printing: Electrographic Industries (D.B. Taraporevala Sons & Co. Pvt. Ltd.) Bombay. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Production: Sw Premabhakta. Ma Deva Weechee. Ma Prem Namra. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, July 1979. 376 pages. Illustrated with photos from darshans. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 765 g. ISBN 0-88050-190-1 (label). 5000 copies. Period: 01.07am – 10.07am 1977. 10 discourses. Subject: Zen. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Booklist by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Translations. Foreign Editions. Books on Bhagwan. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
In colophon: “For the Zen stories quoted in this book acknowledgement is given to: ‘Zen Flesh, Zen Bones’ by Paul Reps, The Charles E. Tuttle Co., 1957. “The Expert” by Nakashima Ton translated by Ivan Morris, originally published in ‘Encounter’, May 1958. ‘Zen and Japanese Culture’ by D.T. Suzuki, The Bollingen Series, Vol. 64, Princeton University press, 1959.”
On front flap: “This book is not about the doctrine and philosophy of Zen but about Zen – its essence, its fragrance, its taste, its energy, its laughter and its tears. It is about falling in love with a ‘way’, not achieving a goal or accomplishing a feat. One has the opportunity through gliding into the music of these words, to discover that pointing direction referred to as Zen.
The radiance of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is like a multifaceted diamond – one facet of that diamond presence is a Zen Master. The luminosity of that facet glows in this book. Bhagwan is not a teacher of Zen but Zen itself – Zen talking about what it itself is.
A pilgrimage into the words on these pages is a pilgrimage into a new dimension – a pilgrimage into the unknown, a pilgrimage into one of the most refined paths to enlightenment… words to open the door to the wordless.
Bhagwan has stated: “Yes, it cannot be said through words – words are inadequate; it cannot be said through silence – silence is very negative. Zen chooses the middle way. It uses words in such a way that they create silence.”
The series of discourses comprising this book were delivered in Poona, India, during the heavy monsoon rains. Like the sky at monsoon time, like vibrant pulsating clouds full and pregnant with moisture, this presence called Bhagwan – this link, this window, this door to the ‘really is’ – releases a never-ending rain of wisdom.
Fall in love with his words and come closer to his mirror awareness. Fall in love with his music and come closer to yourself. Fall in love with his wisdom and begin to know the truth.”
Continued on back flap: “Enter these pages by letting go, opening and participating within as your eyes absorb the words into your being… and allow yourself to become for a time a disciple of a Zen Master, seeing your world and your illusions as they are now. Bhagwan will help you understand that, “The Master is not giving you anything. There is nothing to give. He is simply giving you something that you already have. Rather than saying that the Master gives you something, in fact, he takes many things away from you. He takes those things which you don’t have and think that you have, and he gives you those things which you have but you think that you don’t have.”
Bhagwan brings the ancient Zen to a flowering in this moment, viewing the struggles of today through eyes that know. It is here and now. Zen is a way to be, a way to look – a way to awareness, a way to yourself.
He explains that, “It may look sometimes very crazy that one has to drop all attachments, even attachment to life. It may look very crazy that one has to even transform death into a love affair. It may look very crazy, but life is crazy, life is a paradox.” Leonard Zunin, M.D., Psychiatrist; Diplomat of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology; Author, “Contact – The First Four Minutes”.
“A man of great psychological insight, a seer whose followers speak of him in the same breath as Buddha, Confucius, Jesus, Mohammed and others: Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh.” Het Vaderland, October 11, 1978. (Holland).

Introduction by Ma Anand Mallika. Excerpts:
“Introducing Bhagwan Shree Rajmeesh, Zen Master. His discourses are delicate as the fragrance of green tea, ruthless as the whack of a Zen stick. Bhagwan escorts us on The Path of Paradox:
“Truth cannot be said, but it can be shown.”
And he shows us – leaving not a stone unturned along the way – Zen koans, the Nature of satori, the Three Pillars of Zen, the Man of no Title, the Great Doubt. The landscape is vividly peopled with the outlandish figures of the Zen Masters. Gautam the Buddha, source of Zen:
“Nobody has penetrated so deeply into the mystery of human being as Buddha did… bringing a new breeze into the human consciousness.”
There’s Joshu and his jokes, Chi Ch’ang, the master archer, Rinzai answering questions by beating up the questioner. You will hear Ummon’s diamond statements, and Tosu:
“The founder of a subtle technique of shocking people… using words in a nonsense way.”
Meet Bankei smilingly disarming a priest aggressively opposed to him, Bossui supporting a disciple who faces imminent death, Bodhidharma entering China and deflating the righteous Emperor Wu. There are stories that make you laugh out loud, stories that bring tears to your eyes.
“Zen hits you directly – it creates a situation.”
And you’ll feel it as Bhagwan hits all our sacred cows, answering the questions we dare not ask him, and the questions we dare not ask ourselves: death, love, politics, sex, religion, money. Provoking, shocking, transforming.
“Look!… Have eyes open. Be alert, be mindful. See things as they are.”
He strips away the illusions. If you stay open to that, if you remember:
“The Zen person always keeps the beginner’s mind, ready to learn, not closed…. Listen in the mind without argument. If you are arguing with me, you will miss me. Listen… and ponder in the heart.”
Then you will let the taste roll over your tongue, and drinking deep the tea of Bhagwan’s Zen you will know the flavour. And beyond and behind the words, you will be with Bhagwan:
“That is the ultimate, what in the East we call satsang – to be just in the presence of a Master, just to be.”
Just being creates the opportunity of insight:
“Zen is like looking for the spectacles that are sitting on your nose already.”
Have a good belly-laugh. Have a cup of tea.”

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Now Sit Down and Listen’, on the first morning, 01.07.1977. Beginning with a ancient parable Osho continues:
“That’s what happens around a Master. You need not obey a Master. You have just to be around, available, that’s all. His presence is enough to create the seduction.
The presence of the Master is seductive. It has no commandment. It does not say to you “Do this,” and “Don’t do that” Those who talk like that, they are not Masters. They may be teachers at the most. A Master never says “Do this,” and “Don’t do that.” A Master is not concerned with your actions at all. His concern is deeper, his concern is with your being.
A Master is catching… like measles. In his presence you start catching a different vibe – if you are available, if you are ready to listen, if you are ready to look – then things start moving on their own. That is the meaning of a Master.
What is the difference between a teacher and a Master? A teacher teaches you, he has a doctrine, he has a philosophy. He argues, discusses, proves. A Master is himself the proof. He does not argue, he does not propose any philosophy, he does not give you any ethos. He has no commandments. He does not create any should, he does not give you any ideals. In fact, he takes all ideals away. He does not give you a scripture. He teaches you how to burn all scriptures, how to be free of the word and the theory and the scriptures, you are free to be. Otherwise, thoughts go on clamouring within, thoughts go on clouding within. And thoughts go on distracting you from your center.” (p. 4)

The last discourse in this series ‘Look!’ on 09.07.1977, (last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 10.07.1977), finishes with the words:
“Zen is not a method. Zen is going beyond all methods. Zen is not a way! Zen is dropping all the ways to arrive home. Zen is not a journey – there is no goal in it. Zen is the disappearance of all journeys and the sudden recognition that you are there already, that you have been there always.
Zen is a sudden illumination, abrupt, not gradual, because gradual means practising, step by step. Zen is sudden. Nothing has to be practised. It is already the case.
That which you are seeking is already within you. The seeker is the sought. You just have to stop seeking and look. Look into your form, and you will not find it. Look into your mind, and you will not find it. Look into your self, and you will not find it. And when all these three have not been found, you will find who you are!” (p. 324)

* Sufis. The People of The Path. Volume 1 of 2. Editor and Compiler: Ma Prem Veena. Introduction: Ma Prem Pradeepa. Design: Ma Prem Tushita. Jacket Design: Sw Govinddas. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Processing: Sw Govind Vedant. Typesetting: Ravi and Ashok Enterprises, Poona. Printing: Usha Offset Printers, Bombay. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Production: Ma Deva Urja. Ma Prem Upasana. Ma Prem Hadia. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, July 1979. First Edition. 544 pages. Illustrated with photos from Buddha Hall. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 1055 g. ISBN: o-88050-136-7 (label). 5000 copies. Period: 11.08am – 26.08am 1977. 16 discourses. Subject: Sufism. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Booklist by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Translations. Foreign Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
On front flap: “Once again Bhagwan puts on his Sufi hat and comes to the meditation hall to give his listeners the experience of being a Sufi:
“These talks cannot explain to you what Sufism is – because I am not a philosopher. I am not a theologian either. Ad I am not really talking on Sufism; I will be talking Sufism. If you are ready to go into this adventure, then you will attain to a taste of it. It is something that will start happening in your heart. It is something like a bud opening…”
And whether Bhagwan is answering a question, recounting or commenting on an old Sufi story, telling a joke, or cutting brilliantly away at our so-called knowledge and shattering the illusions in which we hide from ourselves and life, it turns out that all he has really been doing is watering our spiritual gardens so that the bud can begin to open in us.
These discourses, given at the Shree Rajneesh Ashram during August 1977, are examples of the Sufi Master at work, using paradox, parables, jokes, wisdom and absurdity to shake us out of our intellect into our mystical innocence. Bhagwan has no interest in informing us about the mystic. Instead, he creates the possibility for us to discover the mystic for ourselves:
“Everybody is a born mystic. My effort is to liberate your mysticism…” “Become a mystic but don’t believe in mystics. Become a Sufi but don’t believe in Sufis. Become me but don’t believe in me… When you can have the taste, why believe in it?””
Continued on back flap: “Although it’s fun to sift through this book and enjoy the treasures spilled in abundance across its pages, it’s also a good idea to read each discourse at one sitting. “Find an alive Master,” says Bhagwan, because an alive Master will not give you a dead structure. An alive Master will give you only an insight into your being.” To sit and read a complete discourse is to allow the meditative mystery hidden within it to become active in you, and to make this insight into your own being available to you. Just let the river take you. Each discourse is a different journey out of the mind and into the heart, and the scenery along the way is delightful!” Sw Anand Rajen.
“…Through these stories, Bhagwan opens many doors to the Sufi Way… Thus again Bhagwan entices us with his being, seducing us toward the unknown with the beauty of his presentation…” Sufi Times. July, 1978.
“Bhagwan is able, as nobody else, to help us in finding the answer to the fundamental questions of life and death. In his discourses he goes beyond the knowledge of philosophers and scientists of our century pouring out his own experience. His insight transforms our questions into the real quest: how to realize our own being.” Theo. C.C. de Ronde, Ph.D., Doctor of Theology, Former Franciscan monk, Secretary of National Council for Adult Education, Holland.

Introduction by Ma Prem Pradeepa. Excerpts:
“Bhagwan is a living Master, living here in our ashram. I feel the effects of having been chosen by Him as a disciple. (Yes, He says the Master chooses the disciple.) I’m beginning to understand and love the devices my Master uses to open my eyes! Sufi Masters are famous – even notorious – for their naqshbandi, which are designs or maps created to decode our dreaming states. They say that God was the original Sufi Master. His telling Adam and Eve not to eat the fruit of the tree of knowledge was a naqshbandi. God was provoking them to eat this fruit as a challenge, so that they could define themselves…
Reading these discourses on the People of the Path is to be on the Path yourself. You too become a Sufi. I remember sitting through the discourses each morning, knowing these times were full of mental booby-traps. Bhagwan’s consciously devastating words are sheer poetry, opening the door to the freedom of no limits or fixed horizons. Each time I recognize how I’ve misunderstood yet again, I chuckle inwardly. There comes a deep relaxation and let-go as I stop trying to remember or recognize what on earth is going on, letting Him do the work!! The beauty and flow lubricate my soul, and off I go back to where I’ve always been.
Bhagwan say ‘Sufis are the greatest drunkards in the world – but not drunk on any wine you can find in the market-place.’
One last vital point. If this book gives you a contact high, don’t be like the man who was fond of studying systems and wrote to the Dervish Master, Abdul Aziz of Mecca, asking if he could discuss them. Come closer. Bhagwan is alive, well and beckoning…” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘A Rare Kind Of Magic’, on the first morning 11.08.1977.
“Once a learned Mohammedan came to me and asked, ‘You are not a Mohammedan, then why do you speak on Sufism?’ I told him, ‘I am not a Mohammedan, obviously, but I am a Sufi all the same.’
A Sufi need not be a Mohammedan. A Sufi can exist anywhere, in any form – because Sufism is the essential core of all religions. It has nothing to do with Islam in particular. Sufism can exist without islam; Islam cannot exist without Sufism. Without Sufism, Islam is a corpse. Only with Sufism does it become alive.
Whenever a religion is alive it is because of Sufism. Sufism simply means a love affair with God, with the ultimate, a love affair with the whole. It means that one is ready to dissolve into one’s heart. It knows no formality. It is not confined by any dogma, doctrine, creed or church. Christ is a Sufi, so is Mohammed. Krisha is a Sufi, so is Buddha. This is the first thing I would like you to remember: that Sufism is the innermost core – as Zen is, as Hassidism is. These are only different names of the same ultimate relationship with God.” (p. 5)

In the last discourse in this series ‘A Spluttering and a Going Out’ on 25.08.1977, (last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 26.08.1977), Osho talks on Francis Bacon’s introduction of carrying out experiments in science and finishes with the words:
“You will be surprised to know where Bacon got the idea of experiment from. You will not believe it! He got it from Sufism. He was a great reader of Sufi books, he was immensely interested in Sufi books, and from the Sufi ideas he got the idea that if experiment is the door to the inner world, why could it not be the door to the outer? Science owes much to Sufism because of this. If some day the right sources are searched for, then the real fathers of science will be the Sufis, not the Greek philosophers, Aristotle, Plato and others, no. They were all speculators. From where did the idea of experiment enter into the mind of Bacon? It entered from Sufism. He may have read this story or something else, but it entered from Sufism because Sufis are very insistent on experiment.
And if religion is also going to grow, then experiment has to become its very foundation. Just as science has reached such great height within such a small time limit – three hundred years – so religion can also have great possibilities if it becomes experimental. Religion has much to learn from Sufism. Sufism is the most essential religion – that’s why I say it is existential, experimental, experiential.” (p. 498)

* Sufis. The People of The Path. Volume 2 of 2. Editor and Compiler; Ma Prem Veena. Introduction: Sw Anand Rajen. Design: Ma Prem Tushita. Jacket Design: Sw Anand Sangito. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Typesetting: Graphic Systems. Poona. Processing: Rajneesh Foundation Ltd. Poona. Commercial Art Lithographers. Bombay. Printing: Usha Offset Printers. Bombay. Coordination: Me Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Production: Sw Premdharma. Ma Anand Zeno. Ma Anand Parinita. Ma Deva Weechee. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, March 1980. First Edition. 534 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 950 g. No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 27.08am – 10.09am 1977. 15 discourses. Subject: Sufism. Questions an Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Books on Bhagwan. Foreign Editions. Translations. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
On back jacket: “Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is one who can point the way. One who is capable, by virtue of his knowledge of the source, of using and devising methods to make people receptive for that which always was, is and will be: divine love, wisdom, unity, being.” Esotera. August, 1979. (Germany)
“When I read his discourses I feel the unmistakable flavour of experience and wisdom. A wise man is a rare bird in these days. It is better to try to listen to his ancient song… Rajneesh is an extraordinary spiritual Master.” L’Espresso. May 8, 1979. (Italy)
“Rajneesh is no ordinary man. He is no phoney. He is an authority on not only Hinduism but Christianity, Islam, Shintoism, Zen, Zoroaster and Buddhism. It is a feast for the ears to hear him speak. The words cascade like the waters of the Niagara. He does not prepare any lecture as he does not have to. It will be like Einstein looking into the Mathematics text to teach about Euclid’s theorem.” India Tidings. July 8, 1979. (India)
From front flap: “Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is an enlightened Master who, in speaking to us about the world we live in, speaks to us about ourselves in this world with all the wisdom of the sage, which is something we have long forgotten to expect from those who speak. His discourses are spontaneous gifts delivered every morning at eight o’clock. One needs to stop and ponder this fact a moment to appreciate its implications. Here lives this being who appears at the same time each morning, year after year, to talk to those who want to hear him. He speaks usually for over an hour and a half, and every time he speaks, before a gathering of anything from six hundred to three thousand listeners, he brings his audience into the experience of meditation, giving them the taste of enlightenment at the same time that he fascinates with his intellectual virtuosity and relaxed openness of heart. To see him speaking is to witness the personification of consciousness and love without need. To hear him, not explaining like a teacher what Sufism is, but being Sufism for us from the inside – as in other months he is the Zen Master, the Hassidic sage, the Taoist, the Buddha, the Christ – is to feel the Sufi within oneself, here and now on the path of one’s own pilgrimage in life.”
Continued on back flap: “But the most awesome fact about Bhagwan is that he is available, in a unique and inevitably controversial way, to all who have become aware of their own quest as human beings:
“… the first thing, the first and the most important thing is to find a Master. Sufis say the greatest blessing of life is to be with a Master. If you are not with a Master you have missed the whole opportunity, them you lived with the non-essential, then you never came in contact with the essential. And the only way to come in contact with the essential is to be connected with someone who is in contact.”
Today, just seven years since Bhagwan began to initiate people into discipleship – sannyas – there are about 75.000 sannyasins all over the free world.”
“Here is a real Master. A Buddha. How can anyone find anything more attractive? What a blessing that he is available.” Kenneth A. Wolkoff, M.D.
“Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is a phenomenon of pure energy – the boundless power of existence funnelled through this being in human form; focused, and showered on all of us who are willing to partake of it.” Peggy Bier. Former City Editor. The Roanoke Times and World News (U.S.A.)

Introduction by Sw Anand Rajen. Excerpts:
“What had happened to Rajneesh Chandra Mohan cannot be compared with anything familiar to us, and yet it is the ultimate destiny, and raison d’être, of all of us. If we lived in a sane world, all the nations on this earth would have joined in rejoicing and celebrating the enlightenment of this man, because on each of the occasions when this has happened – not simply the enlightenment, but the enlightenment of one who could offer his light to others – the possibility has arisen for humanity to re-enter paradise. It happened when Gautam became the Buddha, when Jesus became Christ, when Mohammed and Krishna and Mansoor and Zarathustra disappeared into what in India is called satchitananda – being, consciousness, bliss.
For anyone to say this about someone who is actually alive right now is of course outrageous, and utterly unacceptable to the masses; hence the crucifixion. As Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh – the name by which this being is now known – says in one of these discourses, ‘Mansoor was murdered, crucified like Jesus. Mohammedans could not understand him. This always happens. You cannot understand any higher point than your own. It becomes a danger to you. If you accept it, then you accept that there is some possibility which is higher than you. That hurts the ego, that humiliates. You would like to destroy a Mansoor or a Christ or a Socrates just for a single reason: that you cannot conceive, you cannot concede, that there is a possibility of some higher standpoint than you. You seem to believe that you are the last thing in existence, that you are the paradigm, that you are the climax that there is no beyond.’…
Our feelings happen to be the door into our inner spirit, our true self, so it is no accident that many people are drawn to Bhagwan through having begun the journey into self-awareness that modern group therapies now make available to the public, nor that many psychotherapists have become sannyasins and now live and practise in the ashram, Bhagwan’s community here in Poona…
Group therapy is expressive and brings us to trusting ourselves to really be authentically ourselves – to be truly individual. Meditation is our letting go of even this individuality, the dissolving into existence, God, bliss. All spiritual seekers who have traveled the path into being have discovered these two states, so it would be a surprise if the Sufis did not have words to describe them…
Bhagwan is here to give us the opportunity to come into our own being through participating in his being. And what being with a Master – being a sannyasin – boils down to is that the undistracted presence of the Master shows you more and more unavoidably how distracted and tangled and preoccupied you are, and at the same time, when you are least expecting it, draws you clean out of your obscuring mind into momentary experiences of being herenow.
Sanyasins can be as confused, blind, distracted, cunning, greedy, mean, unhappy, anxious, exploiting and at the mercy of circumstance as anybody: the only difference is that they are committed to the process – in being with Bhagwan – of becoming less so, and ultimately of dropping the whole process of becoming, and simply being. However far away they may keep themselves from it, they are on the path to their own awakening. This book, like all Bhagwan’s published discourses, makes very clear what this means; but remember, all you have here are the Master’s words, and inspiring and exciting as they are, they stand in the same relation to being with Bhagwan – to being a sannyasin – as a menu does to the meal itself.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Seven Valleys’, on the first morning 27.08.1977.
“Man is a paradox. And man is the only animal, the only being, that is paradoxical – that is man’s uniqueness. Man’s special being is his innermost paradox. All other animals are non-paradoxical.
A tree is a tree, and a dog is a dog, but man is never in a state of isness. He is always becoming, growing. Man is always surpassing himself; that is his paradox. And it is at his very core of being. It is not accidental, it is very fundamental. Once you understand this paradox you have your first glimpse about human-ness – what man is.
Man is always a project, a becoming. His being consists of becoming – this is the paradox. He is always between that which he was and that which he is going to be. He is always between his past and future – a bridge hanging between two eternities, the past and the future. He is a surpassing, a continuous surpassing. Man is never content with that which he is; he is trying to go beyond, always trying to go beyond. Whatsoever he is doing, all his effort is basically how to become something more, something higher, something better.” (p. 5)

The last discourse in this series ‘A Silent Shrine’ on 10.09.1977 finishes with the words:
“One thing may be relevant in one context. It is not relevant in all contexts. But the context comes from your being. So never know more than you are. Be more, know less, and you will always be moving in the right direction. Know a little, but do it, absorb it, digest it – otherwise knowledge can become a kind of indigestion. It can create nausea. You will have to vomit it.
Eat a little, but let it be digested so it becomes blood, bones and marrow.
Sufis are very practical people, very down-to-earth. The sage must have looked into the man and seen that his capacity was very poor. If he had to be helped, he had to start from there. It is not insulting. The sage is not ridiculing. It is out of his compassion that he says, ‘You do two things. One is: stop gathering knowledge – no more. In fact, unlearn all that you have learned. Close your ears and think of something that you like. Think of something that you love. Think of something with which you can fall en rapport, whatsoever it is. That will be the first glimpse of God in your being. And the journey starts from there.” (p. 516)

* The Heart Sutra. Discourses on the Prajnaparamita-Hridayam Sutra of Gautama the Buddha. Editor: Ma Yoga Sudha. Compilation: Ma Yoga Rabiya. Foreword: Ma Prem Pradeepa. Design: Ma Prem Tushita. Photographs: Sw Shivamurti. Sw Krishna Bharti. Printing: B.B. Nadkarni at New Thacker’s Fine Arts Press, Bombay 400 011. Set in Baskerville. Publisher: Aa Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, July 1978. First Edition. 318 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 585 g. No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 11.10am – 20.10am 1977. Subject: Buddha. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Foreign Editions. Tranlations. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
In colophon: “Acknowledgements to ‘The Heart Sutra’ Buddhist Writings Buddhist Wisdom Books Edward Conze for the sutras used in this book.”

Foreword by Ma Prem Pradeepa. Excerpt:
“In this book are ten of the daily morning discourses from our ashram in Poona. You can share this extraordinary situation through these words. This is the transmission of the Dhamma by one who is what he is talking about. You can clearly feel the relationship of disciple to Master, especially in the way he teases and deranges our attitudes to all and everything while answering questions each alternate day.
Some people quake with heart-filled terror, goose-pimpled from head to toe, when hearing the words of Gautama the Buddha. “Gone, gone, gone beyond” can evoke the cosmic horrors like nothing else. I’ve felt petrified by those declarations, yet deep within there’s something indisputably right about them and an understanding that this too will pass, as I go totally into each new moment.
There are some people who find Buddhist texts dry and intellectual, and so they are – unless brought to life with love and humour, and only when they become your very experience. When you taste your Buddha-nature as he salutes the Buddha in you – he who is, after all, a mortal, flesh and blood… who you might recognize as the Master – nothing, but nothing, is more shattering and thrilling. Miracles do exist, and that’s nothing special.
If this book is meaningful to you, if your heart strings are pulled, your mind electrified and terrified, don’t hang on to these words. Be impulsive, act on irrational desires that apparently spring from nowhere. Bhagwan is showing us all how to be a light unto ourselves. My friend, who knows me so well, has just reminded me to remind you to pass the word on to your friends. Come closer to their source. Here and now, the Dhamma wheel is turning again.
HIS BLESSINGS with love, his disciple Ma Prem Pradeepa.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘The Losers Are the Only Winners in This Game’, on the first morning 11.10.1977.
“I salute the Buddha within you. You may not be aware of it, you may not have ever dreamed about it – that you are a Buddha, that nobody can be anything else, that Buddhahood is the very essential core of your being, that it is not something to happen in the future, that it has happened already. It is the very source you come from; it is the source and the goal too. It is from Buddhahood that we move, and it is to Buddhahood that we move.
This one word ‘Buddhahood’ contains all – the full circle of life, from the alpha to the omega.
But you are fast asleep, you don’t know who you are. Not that you have to become a Buddha, but only that you have to recognize it, that you have to return to your own source, that you have to look within yourself. A confrontation with yourself will reveal your Buddhahood. The day one comes to see oneself, the whole existence becomes enlightened. It is not that a person becomes enlightened. How can a person become enlightened? The very idea of being a person is part of the unenlightened mind. It is not that I have become enlightened; the ‘I’ has to be dropped before one can become enlightened, so how can ‘I’ become enlightened? That is absurdity. The day I became enlightened the whole existence became enlightened. Since that moment I have not seen anything other than Buddhas – in many forms, with may names, with a thousand and one problems, but Buddhas still.
So I salute the Buddhas within you.
I am immensely glad that so many Buddhas have gathered here. The very fact of your coming here to me is the beginning of the recognition. The respect in your heart for me, the love in your heart for me, is respect and love for your own Buddhahood. The trust in me is not trust in something extrinsic to you, the trust in me is self-trust. By trusting me you will learn to trust yourself. By coming close to me you will come close to yourself. Only a recognition has to be attained. The diamond is there – you have forgotten about it, or, you have never remembered it from the very beginning…
Listen to these sutras because they are the most important sutras in the great Buddhist literature. Hence they are called The Heart Sutra; it is the very heart of the Buddhist message.” (p. 3)

The last discourse in this series, ‘Gone, Gone, Gone Beyond!’, on 19.10.1977, (last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 20.10.1977), finishes with the words:
“Nothingness is the taste of this whole sutra. Become nothing and you will be all. Only the losers can be the winners in this game. Lose all and you will have all. Cling, possess, and you will lose all.
Buddha is known as Mantra Adipatti: bestower of spells, Master of spells, Mahaguru – but not in the sense that the word has fallen and become a dirty thing in modern times. ‘Guru’ has become a four letter dirty word. Not in that sense. Krishnamurti says that he’s allergic to gurus. It is true.
Buddha is really a Mahaguru. The word ‘guru’ means heavy with heaven, heavy with joy, with ecstasy, heavy with svaha; heavy like a cloud full of rain, ready to shower on anybody who is thirsty, ready to share. ‘Guru’ means heavy, heavy with heaven.
‘Guru’ also means one who destroys the darkness of others. I’m not talking about so-called gurus who go on roaming around the world. They don’t destroy your darkness; they impose their darkness upon you, they impose their ignorance upon you. And these gurus are mushrooming like anything. You can find them everywhere: one Muktananda mushrooming here – another Maharishi Mahesh Yogi mushrooming there – they are mushrooming everywhere.
A guru is one who makes you free. A guru is one who delivers you freedom. A guru is one who liberates you. Buddha is one of the Mahagurus. His message is the greatest that has ever been delivered to man. And this sutra is one of the greatest expressions of Buddha. He has talked for forty-two years, and he has said many things, but nothing compared to this. This is unique. You are fortunate that you have been here to listen to it and to meditate upon it. Now be even more fortunate – become it.” (p. 276)

* I Say Unto You. Talks on the Sayings of Jesus. Volume 1 of 2. Editor: Ma Prem Asha. Compilation: Ma Yoga Rabiya. Introduction: Sw Deva Abhinandan. Design: Sw Deva Anuragi. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Photographs: Sw Krishna Bharti. Calligraphy: Sw Sat Sanudaya. Jacket Design: Sw Anand Sangito. Production: Ma Anand Premda. Ma Deva Weechee. Ma Anand Nirala. Printing: Taraporevala Publishing Industries Pvt. Ltd. Bombay. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, March 1980. First Edition. 345 pages. Hardcover & Paperback. Size: 21×14 cm. Weight: 735 g. No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 21.10am – 01.11am 1977. 10 discourses. Subject: Jesus. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In colophon to second edition (1983): “The sutras quoted in this book were taken from the King James Version of the Holy Bible.”
On back flap:
“It would mean much if Christianity loved their invisible Jesus only half as much as the sannyasins love their visible Master. It would be incredible if Christians would let Jesus’ words penetrate them, if they would live them in such a way as sannyasins understand the words of Jesus and all the world religions through Bhagwan. It would be a step towards revival of the church, if – as it happens in Poona – thousands would leave the old, going radically on the journey of their life, changing privileges and boredom for rejoicing and alert spirituality.” Dr. G. Marcel Martin. Evangelische Kommentatore. December 1978 (Germany)
“Christ came on earth so that our eternal lives could flower. He was neither a Catholic nor a Protestant nor a Jew, but his own man. Rajneesh is his own man and that’s why he is in the process of speaking to you, of pulling you up from your drowsiness. He has a very simple style of speaking. It is as a poet, and not as a commentator or historian, that he speaks.
I was awakened beautifully from my thoughts. Rajneesh, a thousand thanks.” Le Gabriel Rasenstock Cumarstoid. December 1977. (Ireland)
“One of my favourite books I have read is by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh about Jesus Christ.” Comhar. (Ireland)

Introduction by Sw Deva Abhinandan. Excerpts:
“Now here with Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, heart exploding with rejoicing, singing – throat full of hallelujahs, I am for the first time experiencing the meaning of the reality of Jesus Christ. In these discourses Bhagwan strips away the outer layers of our conditional ideals, our myths and muddled moralities, and guides us with light and laughter into the real magic and miracle of Jesus – Jesus the lover, the compassionate, feasting and communing with the common man, the prostitute, the fisherman, embracing all in his love, calling all to him, the lepers and lawbreakers alike! Jesus the rebel. Not the violent political revolution of a Che Guevara, but an inner rebellion that cuts through the masks and facades of dead morality and tradition. A rebellion against darkness that truly opens blind eyes.
Bhagwan tells us the same stories, the same parables, but with a freshness and life never before tasted, showing us with deft strokes their deeper meaning, their timeless relevance. For the first time we feel the laughter, the passion, the silence, and celebration of Jesus Christ. For the first time we really feel him as both son of a man and son of God…
Bhagwan can speak with authority on the Master Jesus, for they fly the same clear sky! These discourses are really an adventure story, not just any adventure story, but a story of the greatest adventure, the only adventure – the adventure of returning to one’s true nature. An adventure of the heart. The adventure of coming home. Here as sannyasins of Bhagwan we have embarked on that adventure. If you read these discourses and your heart is opened, you too may embark. And Cristmas will never be the same again.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘The Flute on God’s Lips’, on the first morning 21.10.1977:
“The Gospel starts in an incredibly beautiful way. No other book starts that way, no other book can start that way. The Bible is ‘the book of the books’: that is the exact meaning of the word ‘Bible’ – the Book. It is the most precious document that humanity has. That’s why it is called ‘The Testament’, because Jesus has witnessed to God in it: Jesus has become the witness to God, a testament. It is the only proof possible.
God cannot be argued, but only a man like Jesus can become a proof for him.
The Gospel carries all that is beautiful in Jesus’ flowering, the Beatitudes. Those statements are the most beautiful ever made. Not even Buddha, not even Lao Tzu, have spoken that way. Buddha is very philosophic, very refined; Jesus is very simple, plain. Jesus speaks like a villager, a farmer, a fisherman. But because he speaks the way common people speak, his words have a solidity, a concreteness, a reality.
Buddha’s words are abstract; they are very very high words, philosophical. Jesus’ words are down-to-earth, very earthly. They have that fragrance of the earth that you come across when the rains have started and the earth is soaking up the rains and a great fragrance arises – the fragrance of the wet earth, the fragrance that you find on a sea beach, the fragrance of the ocean, the trees. Jesus’ words are very very earthbound, rooted in the earth. He is an earthly man, and that is his beauty. Nobody else can be compared with that beauty. The sky is good, but abstract, far away, distant.
So I say to you, no other book starts the way the Gospel starts; no other book talks the way the Gospel talks.
The word ‘gospel’ comes originally from a word godspel. God has spoken through Jesus. Jesus is just a hollow bamboo. The song is of God, and Jesus’ metaphors are very true to life. He is not spinning concepts, he is simply indicating the truth as it is.” (p. 4)

The last discourse in this series, ‘To Receive the Gift of God’ on 31.10.1977, (last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 01.11.1977), finishes with the words:
“Only the feminine mind can receive, because it is non-aggressive. And only a woman can come in deep trust and intimacy; a man remains afraid. And remember, I am not saying that men will not be able to receive, but they will be able to receive only when they also become feminine.
The disciple has to be feminine – whether man or woman, that doesn’t matter. The disciple has to be feminine, because the disciple has to receive the spark, the disciple has to become pregnant with the spark. That’s why the woman at the well has been chosen. Whether it happened historically or not is irrelevant, but it has always been happening. It has happened with Buddha, it has happened with Zarathustra, with Lao Tzu, with Christ. It is happening right now…here!
Meditate over it.” (p. 306)

* I Say Unto You. Talks on the Sayings of Jesus. Volume 2 of 2. Editor: Ma Prem Asha. Compilation: Ma Yoga Rabiya. Introduction: Ma Prem Sagara. Design: Sw Deva Anuragi. Ma Anand Premda. Calligraphy: Sw Sat Samudaya. Jacket Design: Sw Govinddas. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Phototypesetting: Spads Phototype Setting Industries (P) Ltd. Worli. Bombay. Processing: Rajneesh Foundation. Poona. Printing: Taraporevala Publishing Industries Pvt. Ltd. Bombay. Binding: Four Oceans Binders. Bombay. Production: Ma Deva Weechee. Ma Anand Nirala. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, September 1980. First Edition. 375 pages. Illustrated with darshan photos. Unbound. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 750 g. ISBN 0-88050-586-9 (label). 5000 copies. Period: 02.11am – 10.11am 1977. 9 discourses. Subject: Jesus. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Books on Bhagwan. Foreign Editions. Translations. Rajneesh Meditation Centres. Major Book Distributors and Suppliers.
On front flap: “The story of Jesus is familiar to us all – so well-known that the reality of Christ, the ‘crowned one’, has all but passed into a dream. Bhagwan speaks of Jesus… and a reverberation between the two reveals what the true story of a man’s life can be – not just then but now, not just in Jesus but in Bhagwan, in you, in me.”
“This is one of the greatest stories of human transformation in human history – how Adam becomes Christ, how the unconscious becomes luminous, how the ordinary becomes transformed into the extraordinary, how the worldly becomes suffused with the other-worldly, how matter is transmuted into consciousness.” Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh
“We can certainly learn from Bhagwan…. The positive thing about Bhagwan is that he tunes in to the religious and therefore the most intimate feelings of man. He gives you the feeling that you are part of something great.” Libelle Magazine, May 1980. (Holland)
On back flap: “A general convergence of religion and psychotherapy has been happening during the past few years creating various psycho-religious therapeutic methods. In this cohesion, special attention must be given to the movement around Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh…. The psycho-religious movement around Bhagwan is the most outstanding and influential within the broad range that has been developing during the last decade.
Bhagwan creates an image of Jesus that is enriched with the features of an Indian Yogi and Master…. Bhagwan and his programme are an enormous challenge for a Christianity that has identified itself so much with Western society.” Central Office for the Ideological Questions for the German Protestant Church. June 1980. (Germany)
“To say something about Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is a koan. How to describe the grace and delicateness of a petal, the dance of nature or the song of the birds? One has to be with him and feel. To say something about Bhagwan…There is only silence. A rose is a rose is a rose….” Anna Maria de Campos Castilho, Ph.D.

Introduction by Ma Prem Sagara. Excerpts:
“Early morning / in a misty green jungle garden / surrounding an auditorium / named Chuang Tzu. / Several hundred / orange-clad sannyasins / sit silently. // A white-robed figure / comes gliding in / hands raised together / in the traditional greeting, / namaste. / A flowing gesture… radiating / such grace and compassion. // In a soft voice / he begins his morning sutra: / the Gospel according to John. //… And if his words touch the inside of you / where you know this is it, this is true, / may this book be an invitation / to discover God / dancing in you.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Neither Do I Condemn Thee’, on the first morning 02,11.1977.
“Religion always deteriorates into morality. Morality is dead religion. Religion is alive morality. They never meet, they cannot meet, because life and death never meet, light and darkness never meet. But the problem is that they look very alike – the corpse looks very like the living man. Everything is just like when the man was alive: the same face, the same eyes, the same nose, the hair, the body. Just one thing is missing, and that one thing is invisible.
Life is missing, but life is not tangible and not visible. So when a man is dead, he looks as if he is still alive. And with the problem of morality, it becomes more complex.
Morality looks exactly like religion, but it is not. It is a corpse: it stinks of death. Religion is youth, religion is freshness – the freshness of the flowers and the freshness of the morning dew. Religion is splendour – the splendour of the stars, of life, of existence itself. When religion is there, there is no morality at all and the person is moral. But there is no morality; there is no idea of what morality is. It is just natural; it follows you as your shadow follows you. You need not carry your shadow, you need not think about your shadow. You need not look back again and again and see whether the shadow is following you still or not. It follows.” (p. 6)

The last discourse in this series, ‘Ye Shall Live Also’, on 10.11.1977 finishes with the words:
“To the ignorant, death is the death of life. To the knower, death is the beginning of real life. To the knower, death is a door into the divine.
This his parting message is of immense value. Let it sink deep in you. Let it become your heartbeat. That is the only way to meditate upon it. That is the only way to come to its meaning. Forget all that Christians have been saying.
Those dogmatic assertions are all chauvinistic. Forget what the theologians have put on top of Jesus’ pure testaments. Put aside all that has been taught and go directly into these sayings, and meditate. And immense will be the benefit. You will be blessed.
This is one of the greatest stories of human transformation in human history – how Adam becomes Christ, how the unconscious becomes luminous, how the ordinary becomes transformed into the extraordinary, how the worldly becomes suffused with the other-worldly, how matter is transmuted into consciousness.” (p. 352)

* This Very Body the Buddha. Discourses on Hakuin’s Song of Meditation. Editor: Ma Ananda Vandana. Introduction and Afterword: Ma Ananda Vandana. Design: Ma Prem Sarva. Photography: Ma Prem Champa. Sw Krishna Bharti. Co-ordinator: Ma Yoga Pratima. Typesetting: Ravi & Ashok Enterprises. Printing: Army And Navy Press, Bombay. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, December 1978. First Edition. 348 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 680 g. No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 11.12am – 20.12am 1977. 10 discourses. Subject: Zen Masters. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Foreign Editions. Translations. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
Typeset in reddish font.
In colophon: “We gratefully acknowledge the use of ‘A First Reader’, ed. Trevor Leggett, for the sutras quoted in this book.”
On front flap: “Hakuin’s ‘Song of Meditation’ is a very small song, but a great gift. Hakuin is one of the greatest Zen masters. His song contains all – all the Bibles and all the Koans and all the Vedas. A small song of a few lines, but it is like a seed – very small, but if you allow passage to it to your heart, it can become a great tree.
‘This is a song of meditation. If meditation is without a song it is dull and dead – it does not beat, it does not breathe. You will find this song and its meaning only when you are singing and dancing… when the music of life has overtaken you, has possessed you.
‘Hakuin’s song is so small and yet so vast, it is unbelievable. How can a man condense so much insight into so few words? But Hakuin was a man of few words, a man of silence….”
“He is now, without question, the most inspired, the most literate and the most profoundly informed speaker I have heard anywhere. Everything in his philosophy of life has the unmistakable ring of truth: a new experience.” VOGUE.
The structure of this series is one opening discourse on Hakuin’s song on 11.12 followed by four discourses with Questions and Answers. Then on the 16.12 the second discourse on Hakuin’s song followed by four more discourses with Questions and Answers.

Introduction by Ma Ananda Vandana. Excerpt:
“He gave us the first talk in this series on His birthday, December 11th, 1977. a record number of souls had come to Poona to celebrate this day, and Buddha Hall was bursting with embryo Buddhas, thirsty hearts come to drink of The Buddha. His first words to us were:
‘My beloved ones. I love you. Love is my message.’
Many of us were startled, stunned, somehow it was a shock to hear the Master say that He loves us. Next day, somebody sent a question: ‘What is love? I feel what I call love and what you call love are totally different’ And He said:
‘Yes, they have to be totally different. When I talk about love it has the meaning of consciousness in it. When you talk about love it has the darkness of consciousness in it. They are two worlds apart.’
For the ten days of these talks the vision He gave us through Hakuin’s song was so clear as early morning sunlight – that we are Buddhas, that we have never been anything else, that we have only forgotten. That it is utterly impossible to have lost our Buddhahood because that is what we and everything under the sun has always been from the very beginning…” (No page number)

Afterword by Ma Ananda Vandana. Excerpt:
“Everything is getting lighter. Weight-wise and brightness-wise lighter. And I get this delicious sweet feeling whenever I get it that I’m gonna be a star and am just an average ordinary idiot and then I have to hug me a lot seeing as I’m so stupid and sweet.
And as for the Bhagwan lord and master of the idiots… when I feel Him there’s a warm bellyful of well-being and I’m so in love it’s a miracle I can take another breathful of it.” (p. 333)

Osho’s opening discourse, ‘The Lion’s Roar’, on the first morning 11.12.1977.
“My beloved ones: I love you. Love is my message – let it be your message too. Love is my colour and my climate. To me, love is the only religion. All else is just rubbish, all else is nothing but mind-churning dreams. Love is the only substantial thing in life, all else is illusion. Let love grow in you and God will be growing on its own accord. If you miss love you will miss God and all.
There is no way to God without love. God can be forgotten – if love is remembered, God will happen as a consequence. It happens as a consequence. It is the fragrance of love and nothing else. In fact there is no God but only godliness. There is no person like God anywhere. Drop all childish attitudes, don’t go on searching for a father. Divineness is, God is not. When I say divineness is, I mean whatsoever is, is full of God. The green of the trees, and the red and the golden – all is divine. This crow crying, and a bird on the wing, and a child giggling, and a dog barking – all is divine. Nothing else exists.” (p. 5)

The second discourse in this series of two discourses only on Hakuin’s song, ‘This Cake is Delicious’, on 16.12.1977, finishes with the words:
“Zen people talk about four wisdoms…
The first wisdom is called ‘the wisdom of the mirror’. When there is no thought you become a mirror. This is the first wisdom, becoming like a mirror. The second wisdom is called ‘the wisdom of sameness’. When you become a mirror without any thought, all distinctions in the world disappear. Then it is all one. Then the rose and the bird and the earth and the sky and the sea and the sand and the sun are all one, it is one energy.
When you are a mirror – the first wisdom – the second wisdom arises out of the first: the wisdom of sameness. Duality disappears. And out of the second arises the third wisdom, the wisdom of spiritual vision. When you have seen that all over the world it is one energy, then only can you see inside yourself that you are also that energy. Then the seer and the seen become one, the observer and the observed become one. That is the third wisdom, the wisdom of spiritual vision. Buddha has a special word for it, he calls it dhamma chakkhu – the eye for truth, or the truth-eye, The spiritual vision opens – what yogis call ‘the third eye’. What Christ also calls ‘the one eye’, when two eyes become one. Dhamma chakkhu opens, the wisdom of spiritual vision is attained.
And out of the third eye arises the fourth, the wisdom of perfection. When you have seen that all is the same, and when you have looked within and seen that without and within are also the same, you have become perfect. In fact to say that you have become perfect is not true, you have always been perfect. Now it is revealed to you – it is only a revelation. In that moment one knows…
This very place the Lotus paradise
This very body the Buddha.”
(p. 204)

Last discourse, ‘A Single Shout’, out of total eight discourses with Questions and Answers, is on 20.12.1977 and finishes with the words:
“In the end, I would like to repeat Hakuin’s song of meditation.” (p. 328). Then follows Hakuin’s song on pages 330-331.

* The Diamond Sutra. Discourses on the Vajrachchedika Prajnaparamita Sutra of Gautama the Buddha. Editor: Ma Yoga Pramita. Introduction: Ma Yoga Pratima. Design: Sw Anand Yatri. Photograph: Ma Prem Champa. Sw Krishna Bharti. Printing: Vakil and Sons Ltd. 18 Ballard Estate. Bombay. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, March 1979. First Edition. 476 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 850 g. No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 21.12am – 31.12am 1977. 11 discourses. Subject: Buddha. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Translations. Foreign Editions: Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
In colophon: “Grateful acknowledgement is given to ‘Buddhist Wisdom Books’, Edvard Conze, for the sutras quoted in this book.”
On back jacket: “Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is an unusual man, a man so knowledgeable in the inner meaning of Eastern wisdom as to seem to be a living Buddha, and yet also one with a thorough and widespread understanding of the Western mind. The clarity of his writing in this and other books will help foster insight and understanding in any reader who is concerned with self-knowledge.” Charles T. Tart, Ph.D.
On front flap: “A new man is being born. This man will be both of this world and the other. He will be a mystic-poet-scientist.
This book on ‘The Diamond Sutra”, the Way of Buddha, by Bhagwan, is like a diamond, cutting and precious. It cuts through to the very core of this new man.”
Continued on back flap: “Two thousand five hundred years ago, Buddha gave a great gift to the world. He moved a great wheel – the wheel of Dhamma. The two-thousand-five-hundred-year cycle is finishing and the wheel has almost stopped. Bhagwan’s work is to once more move this great wheel; to give a gift to the world.
The hub of this wheel is ‘The Diamond Sutra’ for herein lies the truth of emptiness.”
“Vajracchedika Prajnaparamita Sutra. The name of this Sutra means literally “Diamond Wisdom Transcendence”. Diamond refers to wisdom’s all-conquering power so it can transcend and cut off all earthly worries. The Diamond Sutra, one of the early Buddhist texts of Mahayana doctrine, is also the most commonly recited scripture by its believers, having been repeatedly copied by hand or printed in woodcut ever since its arrival in the Central Plains [in China] in the early fifth century.” (Ming-Chu 2014, p. 212)

Introduction by Ma Yoga Pratima. Excerpts:
“The religionless religion of Buddha is flowering now. Two thousand five hundred years ago the Dhamma wheel moved and the great commune of Buddha started the tide which has come washing down the ages, webbing and rising, sailing with Jesus, Sosan, Kabir, Lieh Tzu, Tilopa, Naropa – the lighthouse keepers along the Way. From shore to shore we’ve been moving, slowly slowly the wheel has stopped turning and has caught us high and dry, gazing at the full moon. And the lord of the full moon, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, is here to turn the wheel again…
The creation of this Buddhafield is happening now, here. And it was foreseen by Buddha when this sutra, ‘The Diamond Sutra’ was born. In this sutra Buddha had seen this commune and the work that was to happen here.
This book is the bridge from Buddha to Bhagwan, from Bhagwan to Buddha… a double-edged sword… a cutting diamond… Bhagwan speaking Buddha speaking Bhagwan… endless reflections… two mirrors bouncing nothingness back and forth, the light reflected, magnified, crystallized, to fall through the sounds and into your heart…
Pass through this diamond prism to Bhagwan.” (p. x)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘That Realm of Nirvana’, on the first morning 21.12.1977.
“I love Gautam the Buddha because he represents to me the essential core of religion. He is not the founder of Buddhism – Buddhism is a by-product – but he is the beginner of a totally different kind of religion in the world. He’s the founder of a religionless religion. He has propounded not religion but religionness. And this is a great radical change in the history of human consciousness.
Before Buddha there were religions but never a pure religiousness. Man was not yet mature. With Buddha, humanity enters into a mature age. All human beings have not yet entered into that, that’s true, but Buddha has heralded the path; Buddha has opened the gateless gate. It takes time for human beings to understand such a deep message. Buddha’s message is the deepest ever. Nobody has done the work that Buddha has done, the way he has done. Nobody represents pure fragrance.
Other founders of religions, other enlightened people, have compromised with their audience. Buddha remains uncompromised, hence his purity. He does not care what you can understand, he cares only what the truth is. And he says it without being worried whether you understand it or not. In a way this looks hard; in another way this is great compassion.
Truth has to be said as it is. The moment you compromise, the moment you bring truth to the ordinary level of human consciousness, it loses its soul, it becomes superficial, it becomes a dead thing. You cannot bring truth to the level of human beings; human beings have to be led to the level of truth. That is Buddha’s great work.” (p. 5)

The last discourse in this series, ‘The Fully Enlightened One’, on 31.12.1977 finishes with the words:
“At the innermost core there is no distinction.
Buddha is saying don’t be too much concerned with the words. Use them as steps, stepping-stones. Don’t be too much concerned with Buddha’s movements, bodily movements. People are there, imitative people, who will start walking like the Buddha, who will start talking like the Buddha, who will start using the same words, the same gestures. Buddha is saying those are not the real things. The real thing is beyond forms. It cannot be imitated.
Don’t imitate the master. Only then one day will you be able to become the master. Love, listen, but always remember that you have to go far in. You have to transcend all clouds.” (p. 461)

1978 Talks in Buddha Hall

* Walk Without Feet Fly Without Wings and Think Without Mind. Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Responding to Disciples’ Questions. Editor and Compiler: Ma Yoga Anurag. Introduction: Ma Prem Maitri. Design: Ma Prem Tushita. Photography: Ma Prem Champa. Sw Krishna Bharti. Sw Shivamurti. Printing: B.B. Nadkarni at New Thacker’s Fine Art Press Pvt. Ltd., Mahalaxmi, Bombay 400 011. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, March 1979. First Edition. 370 pages. Illustrated. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 695 . No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 01.01am – 10.01am 1978. 10 discourses. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Darshan Diaries. Translations. Foreign Editions. Books on Bhagwan. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
On front and back flaps quotes from an introduction to Osho by Jan Vintilescu. In: Sökaren, 1978:6 June. Sweden.
On back flap: “Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is a Living Master who prepares his disciples for a ‘Celebration of Life’. His innovative therapy groups bypass the standard rational mind approach and instead deal directly with man’s natural flow of energy as the key to spiritual growth.” Donald Barmack, L.L.B., Ph.D., Lawyer and Psychologist.
The structure of this series is unique as all discourses are responses to disciples’ questions and no sutra is commented upon. As in Osho’s first English discourse series in Poona One, ‘The Way of the White Clouds’ (1975).

Introduction by Ma Prem Maitri. Excerpt:
“Here in these pages / lies his response to the questions / that for ten days were seeds for his discourses. / An unsual happening: / at the last minute / Bhagwan put aside the writings of Shankaracharya / that had been scheduled for discussion for these days, / and questions from folk like you and me / became the sutras for each of these ten mornings. / Lucky you, you are about to taste the nectar / of these mornings. / This is no ordinary book – / its secret lies behind your breath as you read. / It’s not the philosophy, no – / not the wealth of information here, / not even the useful titbits that brighten your day. / This is something else…//” (No page number)

Questions to be answered are mentioned for each chapter.

* The Revolution. Discourses on Kabir. Editor and Compiler: Ma Ananda Vandana. Introduction: Ma Ananda Vandana. Design: Ma Prem Sarva. Ma Prem Tushita. Jacket Design: Sw Govinddas. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Processing: Sw Govind Vedant. Typesetting: Ravi and Ashok Enterprises, Poona. Printing: Army and Navy Press, Bombay. Production: Ma Deva Layo. Sw Anand Satyam. Sw Anand Bashir. Sw Rameshwar. Coordination: Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, July 1979. First Edition. 411 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 795 g. No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 11.02 am – 20.02am 1978. 10 discourses. Subject: Kabir. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Booklist by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Darshan Diaries. Translations. Foreign Editions. Books on Bhagwan. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
In colophon: “For the ten poems by Kabir quoted in this book, grateful acknowledgement is given to: ‘Try to Live to See This’ version by Robert Bly, published by the Ally Press, 1976.”
On front and back flaps quotations from discourses. On back flap: “The early morning discourses given by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh are awesome, penetrating, disturbing, loving and totally revolutionary – like nothing else I have ever experienced.” Dr. G.A. Meredith [aka Amrito], Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery. Member of the Royal College of Physicians, Member of the Royal College of Surgeons.

Introduction by Ma Ananda Vandana. Excerpt:
“This book is an inflammatory document. These ten talks were given by the Rebel Master Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh at His headquarters in Poona, India, in February 1978. Taking ten fiery songs of another Rebel Master – the fifteenth century mystic poet, Kabir – Bhagwan put a blowtorch to a thousand hearts, blowing wild wind into our ears, sending blood racing through our veins and passion pounding at every pore. He means business. His revolution is no abstract philosophical dusty-spiritual concept. It is a living reality full of fire-breath, red blood and the sweat of flooding love energy.” (No page number(

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘A Hand Beckoning’, on the first morning 11.02.1978.
“There is nothing but water in the holy pools. I know, I have been swimming in them. All the gods sculpted of wood and ivory can’t say a word. I know, I have been crying out to them. The Sacred Books of the East are nothing but words. I looked through their covers one day sideways. What Kabir talks about is only what he has lived through. If you have not lived through something, it is not true…
The gods of the past are dead. And they cannot be revived again. They have become irrelevant to human consciousness; they were created by a very immature mind. Man has come of age. He needs a different visions of the gods, he needs a different kind of religion. He needs to be freed from his yesterdays, because only then can the tomorrow become possible. The old has to die for the new to be.
It is good that the old gods are gone – but it is difficult for humanity to say goodbye to them. Humanity has become too familiar with them. They have been a great consolation and comfort and convenience, they have been a sort of security. Dropping them one feels frightened, scared.
Mind wants to remain with the known because the known is the familiar, the trodden. Mind is always afraid to move into the unknown. The unknown on the one hand challenges, attracts, on the other hand creates fear. It is unpredictable, one cannot know beforehand what will be the outcome. And mind is always orthodox, it is conventional. Mind is a convention, mind is traditional, mind is tradition. So the problem is always there – mind clings with the past and life wants to go into the future, and there is a constant tug of war between mind and life.
Those who choose mind remain dead. Those who choose life against mind are the salt of the earth.” (p. 6)

The last discourse in this series, ‘The Sword of Love-And-Death’ on 19.02.1978, (last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 20.02.1978), finishes with the words:
“Mystics believe in drastic methods. The situation is such, desperate, that only a drastic thing can help. A sword is needed. Kabir is a sword. And you can also create your own sword. The sword is created by two energies: love and death.” (p. 354)

* The Wisdom of the Sands. Discourses on Sufism. Volume 1 of 2. Editor: Ma Yoga Sudha. Compilation: Ma Yoga Rabiya. Introduction: Sw Prem Pramod. Design: Ma Anand Premda. Sw Anand Subhadra. Photographs: Sw Krishna Bharti. Jacket Design: Sw Anand Sangito. Typesetting: Spads Phototype Setting Industries (P) Ltd. Processing: Rajneesh Foundation Limited. Printing: Taraporevala Publishing Industries Pvt. Ltd. Binding: Four Oceans Binders. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Production: Ma Deva Layo. Ma Prem Hadia. Ma Deva Rashida. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, March 1980. First Edition. 397 pages. Illustrated. Unbound. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 680 g. ISBN 0-88050-674-1 (label). 5000 copies. US$ 15.95. Period: 21.02am – 01.03am 1978. 9 discourses. Subject. Sufism. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Darshan Diaries. Books on Bhagwan. Foreign Editions. Translations. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
On front flap: “There are tales that are not just tales. Stories that are not merely stories. They are magical devices. Entering their world you may suddenly find that you have left your own. And then a moment comes that seems to leave both worlds behind – that brings you to some third land where for the briefest moment a kind of clarity enters in, and you stand stricken with a flash of understanding. This is precious magic indeed.
Yet how much more precious to have a magician present himself – to tell these tales once more, and to share the vision they evoke in him. Here in these pages is a record of that unique meeting: a meeting of ancient stories of the Sufi mystics with a modern master bound by no school or tradition, but bursting with the freshness of his own awakened being.
Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is the living master whose daily discourses have been captured here. Each morning, in a large, open hall in his ashram in Poona, India, several thousand disciples assemble to sit, to listen, but most of all, simply to be with – to commune with the presence of enlightenment. If a seeker lives within you – however hidden, however shy – he can be summoned by this book.” Sw Devabodhi.
On back flap: “At the Shree Rajneesh Ashram in Poona, India, a provocative laboratory in consciousness that is unique to the world is unfolding. As if rising out of nothingness, an existential center of transcendental psychology is emerging, bringing together Western therapeutic and humanistic growth movements with Eastern esoteric teachings and meditative practices. The unique, revolutionary feature of this melding of traditional with modern, East with West, love with meditation, is that it is interwoven on the fabric of the Master-disciple relationship.
The source and heartbeat of this experimental commune is Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, an enlightened Master called lovingly by his disciples, simply, Bhagwan.
In the manner of a Master Magician, Bhagwan creates from apparent nothingness, and in a wink presents the world with a stage upon which a new level of human actualization is now possible.
In short, now in Poona, India, is the most flourishing, broadest-based therapeutic community and Growth Center in the world today.” Robert M. Birnbaum [aka Sw Amitabh], Ph.D. Clinical Psychologist; Associate Professor, San Francisco State College.

Introduction by Sw Prem Pramod. Excerpts:
“When you reach the desert, the way ahead is uncharted. It is easy to go astray among the shifting sands, the mirages, the false horizons. You need a guide, not a bicycle mechanic, if you want to try this crossing.
There is a man here, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, who has crossed the sands and now help others to cross. A Marco Polo of the soul. And though each journey is different, he knows where he is leading, for he is already there. At home…
Bhagwan goes on showing that there is no need to fight the sands, nor is it possible to win such a fight. Read the first chapter in this book carefully: we can be free men in the same way that the stream finds its freedom – by being willing to evaporate, by giving up all the ideas it has of what it is. These ideas, this personality, is the desert.
Bhagwan is the wind-whisperings to the stream: “Yes, you can cross. Evaporate, be carried by the loving arms of existence. Accept the danger… it is worth it.” That same fragrance!
To reach the sea all we require is the capacity to hear, understand and trust this whisper, this wisdom of the sands.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘The Tale Of The Sands’, on the first morning 21.02.1978.
“We enter today into the world of Sufism. It is a world but not a world-view. It is a transcendence, but not a philosophy of transcendence. It does not preach any theories, it simply gives you practical hints.
Sufism is not speculative. It is utterly realistic, pragmatic, practical. It is down-to-earth, it is not abstract. Hence, it has no world-view. And also, because it is not a system, it does not systematize knowledge.
A system is a complete explanation of existence. Sufism is not a system; it has no explanation of existence, it is a way into the mysteries of existence. It does not explain anything, it simply points to the mysterious. It leads you into the mysterious. Sufism does not demystify existence. All systems do that: their whole work consists in making the unknown known, destroying the mystery, destroying the wonder. Sufism leads you from one wonder to another, deeper into the wonderland.
It is not a system because it never gives any complete explanation about anything. It gives only very, very small hints, flashes of insight. It does not spin and weave philosophies; it spins and weave stories, anecdotes, metaphors, parables, poetry. It is not metaphysics, it is metaphor, It is a finger pointing to the moon. You cannot understand the moon by analyzing the finger. But if you follow the direction with sympathy, if you fall en rapport, then you will come to see the moon. The finger is not the moon, the finger cannot be the moon, yet the finger can point the way.
The Sufi stories are not philosophical. They are just gentle hints, whisperings. Sufism does not shout, it only whispers. Naturally, only those who are ready to listen with sympathy – not only with sympathy, but empathy – only those who are ready to open their hearts in trust and in surrender can understand what Sufism is. Only those who are capable of love can understand what Sufism is.” (p. 8)

The last discourse in this series, ‘The Mad King’s Idol’, on 27.02.1978, (the two last discourses are with Questions and Answers on 28.02 and 01.03.1978), finishes with the words:
“This is the ego: thinking yourself separate from existence is the ego. Thinking yourself one with the existence is trust.
Don’t protect yourself. Protection means you have believed the false idea that you are separate. Don’t push the river. Go with the flow of existence. While alive, be alive; while dying, be really dying; while dead, be dead. Waking, wake. Sleeping, sleep. Let there be no separation between you and the life that surrounds you.
And don’t act out of a state called knowledge; that is creating the separation. Always act out of no-knowledge, act out of no-mind, act out of no-past. Act in the present and act authentically. And whosoever you are – you may be a prostitute – if you can act out of the present, if you can respond to reality truly, authentically, sincerely, then there is no barrier between you and God.
The only thing that helps you merge and meet with the divine is an authentic response in the present, a truthful response to life. That’s what I call prayer.” (p. 270)

* The Wisdom of the Sands. Discourses on Sufism. Volume 2 of 2. Editor: Ma Yoga Sudha. Compilation: Ma Yoga Rabiya. Introduction: Ma Deva Ritambhara. Design: Ma Ananda Prem. Photographs: Sw Krishna Bharti. Jacket Design: Sw Govinddas. Typesetting: Spads Phototype Setting Industries (P) Ltd. Processing: Rajneesh Foundation Limited. Printing: Taraporevala Publishing Industries Pvt. Ltd. Binding: Four Oceans Binders. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, December 1980. First Edition. 386 pages. Unbound. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 590 g. ISBN 0-88050-675-X (label). 5000 copies. Period: 02.03am – 10.03am 1978. 9 discourses. Subject: Sufism. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Darshan Diaries. Books on Bhagwan. Foreign Editions. Translations. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
On front and back flaps: Quotations from: Bernard Levin. In: The Times. April 8, 1980. England. All Levin’s features from the Poona ashram are to be found in the Appendix to volume II.

Introduction by Ma Deva Ritambhara. April 1980. Excerpts:
“It is only with a master, a real master such as Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, that such a jump is possible. He is a taste of the unknown, a glimpse of what is within each of us and what is possible for all of us. His very presence creates an atmosphere (we call it a Buddhafield) which enables us to experience enough love, awareness and compassion to take the jump ourselves. He is the bridge, the guide towards our own inner master…
Each day he offers us the chance to jump; each moment an opportunity for growth…
This book is an invitation to experience this unique living master. It is a series of morning discourses on Sufi stories and questions from disciples and visitors. These stories are also guides pointing the way to the ultimate…
Bhagwan is able to lead us deeper and deeper into the story within the story – that which is contained beyond the words. These discourses seem merely an excuse for him to shower us with his love and compassion while gently (and sometimes not so gently) leading us towards the unknown. One such guide is rare – an opportunity for those of us who seek more.
The possibilities are infinite. So jump! Take the risk. All you can lose is your ego, your games, your false identities. On the other side is a realness, an openness, a joy in life. Jump – jump into this book, into Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Perhaps someone will save you…” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘The Man With The Inexplicable Life’ [Mojud], on the first morning 02.03.1978.
“The story that we are going to go into today is one of the greatest stories. It has that special flavor that only a Sufi story can have. It is incomparable. If you can understand this story, you will have understood the very secret of religion. If you can’t understand this story, you will not be able to understand religion at all.
This belongs to the very foundation of religious consciousness. Without it there can be no religious transformation. So listen to this story as attentively as possible. Let this story sink deep into your being. This story can open a door, this story can become such a radical change in your life that you may never be the same again. But the story has to be understood very minutely, very carefully, very lovingly, because it is a strange tale.
It is not just a story; Sufi stories are not just stories. They are not to entertain you; they are not to just give you an occupation. They are teaching devices. They indicate something, they show something, they point to something. They are pointers, they are arrows towards the unknown, fingers pointing to the moon. And remember this saying of the Sufis: Don’t bite my finger, look where I am pointing.
It is very easy to be entertained by such stories, but that is not their purpose. You miss the point. They are reflections of the beyond. They say that which cannot be said and they try to express that which is inexpressible. They are not about ordinary life, they are not about the mundane world. They belong to the innermost search for truth, they belong to the center of your being. They are beautiful devices. If you simply pay attention, if you meditate on the story, parallel to the story something else will start revealing itself in your being. The story is on one plane, but the revelation is on another plane, parallel to it. Unless you start tasting that parallel revelation, remember, you have missed the point. And to miss the point is very easy. No intelligence is needed to miss the point; any stupid person can do it. But to understand, it will require great intelligence. So pull yourself together. Become integrated for these few moments. Listen as totally as possible, just become your ears. Be there. Something of immense value is being imparted in this story.” (p. 10)

The last discourse in this series, ‘Thirsty’, on 08.03.1978, (the two last discourses are with Questions and Answers on 09.03 and 10.03.1978), finishes with the words:
“Truth is very simple. If you can dance and dance deeply, so deeply that the dancer disappears in the dance, the problems will change, because in that disappearance of the dancer, the ego will disappear and you will have a look at reality without the ego. That is the only transforming force. That is the only radical revolution.
Remember, all great truths are simple. Lies are not simple. They cannot afford to be simple, because then you will catch hold of them and you will immediately know this is a lie. The lie has to be very, very sophisticated, slippery; you can’t catch hold of it. And it has to be so complex that you can go on and on, round and round in it, and you can never find a door out of it. It has to use jargon, great complicated words.
Truth is as simple as the sun, as these birds singing, as these trees’ green. Truth is as simple as the green of the tree, the red of the tree, the gold of the tree. Truth is as simple as “I am here. You are here.” Truth is as simple as this moment, the pause between you and me. Truth is as simple as this pause…” (p. 285)

* Take It Easy. 14 Discourses given by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Based on the Doka of Zen Master Ikkyu. Volume 1 of 2. Editing and Compiling: Ma Yoga Anurag. Ma Ananda Vandana. Introduction: Ma Sagarpriya [Roberta DeLong Miller]. Design: Ma Prem Tushita. Photography: Ma Prem Champa. Sw Krishna Bharti. Sw Shivamurti. Ma Yoga Vivek. Printing: Vakil and Sons. 18, Ballard Estate. Bombay. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, March 1979. First Edition. 568 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 1060 g. 5000 copies. Period: 11.04am – 24.04am 1978. 14 discourses. Subject: Zen (Ikkyu). Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rjneesh. Darshan Diaries. Translations. Foreign Editions. Books on Bhagwan. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
In colophon: “Acknowledgement is given to ‘Zen and Zen Classics’ volumes I and V by R.H. Blyth – Hokuseido Press for the doka of Ikkyu quoted in this book.”
The doka is printed in Japanese characters also. With drawings of Osho and cartoon by Yatri.
Volume 1 and 2 cover a series of 27 discourses from 11.04-11.05.1978.

Introduction by Ma Sagarpriya. Excerpt:
“We who attended the lectures found ourselves in shock as they progressed. “Take it easy, Bhagwan,” we were saying. “This hurts! Enough… please, enough! You are destroying our dreams. You are taking away everything we believe in, all we have suffered our whole lives to protect.” We would leave the lecture hall burnt, frazzled – in contrast to Bhagwan’s innocent and peaceful departure – wondering what had hit us. And the next day we would be back for more. Everyone reacted strongly to the lectures, pro or con. About the only thing we could all agree on was that the message was heavy and deep, aimed at the very core of our beings.
I, for one, loved these lectures. My complaining was only on the surface. In my heart of hearts I knew that what Bhagwan was saying about emptiness, about there being nobody, was the truth, and something in me relaxed with the recognition. I began to glow inside. And the remarkable thing is that the relaxation, the contentment, was not temporary. It has grown deeper. Now, four months later, re-reading these words, I find that the feeling of emptiness is no longer shocking or uncomfortable; rather, it brings me great joy. The mindlessness of existence no longer bothers me, and as a consequence life is so easy, so simple. And something new is appearing inside me: it is the quality of Ikkyu’s songs, the silence to which the words point before they disappear.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Back From the Leaky Road’, on the first morning 11.04.1978.
“Religion is irrational – by the irrational and for the irrational. Reason cannot contain it; reason is so small. Religion is the vast sky of existence. Reason is a tiny human phenomenon. The reason has to be lost, has to be dropped. Only by going beyond the mind does one start understanding what is. That’s the radical change. No philosophy can bring that radical change – only religion.
Religion is non-philosophic, anti-philosophic, and Zen is the purest form of religion. Zen is the very essence of religion. Hence it is irrational, it is absurd. If you try to understand it logically you will be bewildered. It can only be understood illogically. It has to be approached in deep sympathy and love. You cannot approach Zen through empirical, scientific, objective concepts. They all have to be dropped.
It is a heart phenomenon. You have to feel it rather than think it. You have to be it to know it. Being is knowing. And there is no other knowing.
That’s why religion has to choose a different kind of language. Religion has to talk in parables, in poetry, in metaphors, in myths. Those are indirect ways of hinting at the truth – only hinting at the truth, no direct pointing; just whispering, not shouting. It comes to you in a deep rapport.” (p. 6)

The last discourse in this series, ‘Daruma, the Cat and the Ladle’, on 23.04.1978, (the last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 24.04.1978), finishes with the words:
“Consciousness is a river. Don’t carry guidebooks. Don’t be a Hindu and a Mohammedan – these are carrying guidebooks. Just move slowly slowly, spontaneously, alert, sensitive, alive to each moment, totally alive – because there is no tomorrow, there is no next moment. This way one comes home one day, one evaporates, one disappears. That is the day when one has come.
Your disappearance is the beginning of the real to appear in you. Your disappearance is the appearance of God. Remember it. This is one of the most important things to remember; otherwise, the so-called spiritual people, sooner or later, harden. And the moment they harden, they have destroyed all possibility. Then they are not becoming more and more intelligent, aware. They are becoming dull and dead.
Never become a mahatma, dull and dead. Be alive. Become innocent of all characther, of all ideology, of all perfectionist ideas. The man who is a perfectionist is bound to become a neurotic. And all hard people are neurotics. Only soft people are divine – the softer, the more divine.
That’s why you cannot see God, because he is so soft, so soft that he is invisible. You cannot see God because he is so soft, you cannot touch him. You can become Gods, but you cannot see him, you cannot touch him.” (p. 517)

* Take It Easy. 13 Discourses given by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Based on the Doka of Zen Master Ikkyu. Volume 2 of 2. Editor and Compiler: Ma Ananda Vandana. Introduction: Ma Ananda Vandana. Design: Ma Prem Tushita. Photography: Ma Prem Champa. Ma Toga Vivek. Sw Krishna Bharti. Sw Shivamurti. Printing: Vakil and Sons Ltd., Bombay. Production: Ma Deva Weechee. Ma Deva Layo. Sw Das Anudas. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, November 1979. First Edition. 565 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 1075 g. 5000 copies. Period: 25.04am – 11.05am 1978. 13 discourses. Subject: Zen (Ikkyu). Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Darshan Diaries. Books on Bhagwan. Foreign Editions. Translations. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
In colophon: “Ikkyu’s doka is taken from ‘Zen and Zen Classics’ volume 5 by R.H. Blyth, copyright 1962 by R.H. Blyth and 1978 by Frederick Franck. It is reprinted by permission of Joan Daves.”
The doka is printed also in Japanese characters. Drawings of Osho made by Yatri.
Volume 1 and 2 covers a series of 27 discourses from 11.04-11.05.1978.
No discourses on 03-06.05.1978. “And then there were four mornings / When the Master was neither seen nor heard / Yet the hall was bursting with His absent presence / And His singing silence poured into a thousand hearts.” (p. 331). The following pages 332-357 are sepia photos of devotees sitting silently in Buddha Hall.

Introduction by Ma Ananda Vandana. Excerpts:
“This is the book for the spiritual seeker who’s read everything and yet somehow survived. This one you won’t survive – that is, if you can read it. For the contents of this book are such that if you can keep your attention in focus for more than a few seconds at a time, then plunging into these pages you may well be entering the last literary investigation of your starry spiritual career… And where your head once was, there might well be inscribed something like: “Took It Easy.”…
This book is a beaming bright light on the path. And an unequivocal statement that there’s no light, no path, nothing to find and no one who’s looking…
POONA APRIL/MAY 1978
Walking out of these discourses stunned, bruised, dishevelled, with bits and pieces bent and missing, what on earth were people looking so glad about?…
Then if you make it to chapter eight, this is where Bhagwan and his mate, Ikkyu, disappeared within the walls of his residence for four days, doubtless to devise new games to play with silly seekers, and probably to have a good guffaw at our antics.
Some mistook these days for a respite or rest-brake and stayed home, or went out for breakfast, or in some way tried to do some rapid repair work on their seeker’s image. You will have to read the later chapters to see how he dealt with them.
Others went to the hall anyway on those four mornings to await sentence in the absence of the Master’s physical presence. Now, you’d never know, looking at the pictures, that the fate of these very souls hung in the balance at that moment. They look quite peaceful and relaxed really – almost as if they’re taking something dangerously easy.
Then back they came, armed afresh to deal another five days’ worth of dazzling blows to any remaining seekers still to be found propped up against pillars in the hall.
It was pretty hard to take. Day after day of that relentless liberation campaign. How did they expect us to take it all! They must think we’re crazy buddhas or something…
So, brave seeker, read on! Those who survive to tell the tale of those Take-It-Easy days wave you goodbye as you disappear within the pages of this book, and devoutly wish that you may never return!” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘The Medicine of Unborn Undying’, on the first morning 25.04.1978.
“A monk asks Master Pai-Chang, “Who is the Buddha?” Pai-Chang answers, “Who are you?”
The purpose of the buddhas is not to inform you but to transform you. They want to bring a radical change in your consciousness, they want to change your very roots. They want to bring new eyes to you, new clarity. Their purpose is not to inform. They are not there to transfer some knowledge but to transplant some being. They want to share their light with you – the purpose is not to inform but to enlighten.
Hence they don’t bother what your question is. Their answers may sometimes look very irrelevant, absurd. They are not – but they have a totally different kind of relevancy. They are relevant to you, not to your question.” (p. 6)

The last discourse in this series, ‘In the House of the Moon’, on 10.05.1978, (the last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 11.05.1978), finishes with the words:
“Buddhism says: There is only one sin, if you want to call it a sin, and that is sleep, unawareness. And there is only one virtue, if you want to call it a virtue – that is awareness, wakefulness. Buddhism is a very scientific religion, psychological to its very roots. The greatest psychological insight yet.” (p. 510)

* The Sun Rises in the Evening. Talks on Zen. Editor: Ma Prem Asha. Introduction: Ma Prem Asha. Design: Sw Prem Deekshant. Cover Design: Sw Anand Sangito. Printing: Vakil & Sons Ltd., Bombay. Production: Ma Prem Namra. Ma Prem Upasana. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, March 1980. First Edition. 364 pages, Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 670 g. ISBN: 0-88050-139-1 (label). 5000 copies. Period: 11.06am – 20.06am 1978. 10 discourses. Subject: Zen. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Darshan Diaries. Books on Bhagwan. Foreign Editions. Translations. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
On back jacket: “Bhagwan’s lectures shattered me. Not that he proclaimed any revolutionary novelties, but he did bring me into contact with things which had been slumbering deep inside – a sort of unnerving recognition. The most important thing was that I was immediately convinced that there sat someone who was speaking from his own experience. My prejudices disappeared.” Marcel Meier. Pol Magazine. April 1979. Australia.
From front flap: “Get one book by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, whether it is on Yoga, Vedanta, Tantra or Tao. Once in your hands you will not be able to put it down. It is so simple, so interesting, so illuminating. And you will read anecdotes that teach you even as you laugh. Bhagwan’s talks are taped and transcribed without any need to edit them.
By bringing out these books, the Rajneesh Foundation has done yeoman service for posterity. Nowhere else has such an attempt been made to bring the great religions and teachers within the comprehension of all of us.” India Tidings. July 8, 1979. India.
On back flap: “Bhagwan is unique. Is he a spiritual materialist or a materialistic spiritualist? It is certain that he is not a traditional leader. For him, body and soul are two poles of the same whole.
Daily he reveals to his disciples such Eastern mystical traditions as Tantra, Tao, Zen, Sufism. At the same time he embraces Western science and technology. This meeting of East and West in each of us is his playful work. It is confusing to the religious and political leaders of our day, but nevertheless continues to attract more and more people of different paths from all over the world.” Theo. C.C. de Ronde, Ph.D. Doctor of Theology. Former Franciscan monk. Secretary of National Council for Adult Education. Holland.
“He is the most extraordinary Master of the century. To read this book is a blessing.” Paul Cambell. Former Director. Davidson Clinic for Analytical Psychology. Scotland.

Introduction by Ma Prem Asha. Excerpt:
“I have seen the sun rising in the evening, and since then I have been drunk with that which is…
To hear Bhagwan speak these words is to be encompassed by a moment of total shock, a moment of electrocution when all the circuits are blown and all that remains in the hovering daze of ignorance is the realization that to look at Bhagwan / is not to know what one sees, / to listen to him / is not to know what one hears, / to be with him / is not to know anymore what is happening…” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Always at Ease, Unmoved…’, on the first morning 11.06.1978.
“I have seen the sun rising in the evening and since then I have been drunk with that which is. You can call it God, you can call it nirvana, you can call it any name – it does not matter. Whether you give it a name or you don’t give it, it remains the same. A rose is a rose is a rose. But one thing is certain about it: that the sun rises in the evening.
The apparent is not real; the real is just the opposite of the apparent. It is obvious that the sun rises in the morning. To deny the apparent and the obvious I say that I have seen the sun rising in the evening.
The experience of the Buddhas contradicts the experience of everyone else. It is not common; it is unique, it is extraordinary. Ordinarily, whatsoever we have become accustomed to know is just a mind game, because we look at that which is with loaded eyes. Our mirrors are covered with great dust; they have become incapable of reflecting the real. The real is not far away, the real surrounds you. You are part of it, it is part of you. You are not separate from it, you have never been separate from it. You cannot be separate from it – there is no way to be separate from it, it is impossible to be separate from it. But still, the dust-covered mirror is incapable of reflecting it. Once the dust disappears, you will be surprised that all that you have been seeking was not needed to be sought at all, because you had it already. (p. 5)

The last discourse in this series, ‘It Never Leaves This Place…’, on 19.06.1978, (the last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 20.06.1978), finishes with the words:
“But the only thing that is needed, all that is needed, is not to go anywhere. Be in a passive, alert state, and you will see the sun rising in the evening, and you will see the impossible becoming possible, you will see mysteries opening up, you will see all paradoxes dissolving. You will know, yet you will not be able to reduce it to knowledge. You will know, but you will become dumb. You will know, but you will not be able to say anything about it. Nobody has ever said anything about it.
I am also not saying anything about it. All that I am saying is how it can become possible, how you can create the occasion in which it becomes recognized by you, how you can remove a few rocks around you of words, principles, doctrines, so that the stream starts flowing. That flow is the flow of God, of life itself. It knows no death, it knows no fear, it knows no greed. Its purity, its grandeur, its beatitude, its benediction is infinite.
I have seen the sun rising in the evening. Come with me so that you can also see the sun rising in the evening. Once you have seen it rising in the evening, darkness disappears, and your night is full of the day; death disappears, your death is full of life.” (p. 311)

* The Perfect Master. Talks on Sufi Stories. Volume 1 of 2. Editor and Compiler: Ma Yoga Anurag. Introduction: Ma Prem Maitri. Design: Ma Anand Premda. Ma Anand Jen. Cover Design: Sw Govinddas. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Typesetting: Spads Phototype Setting Industries (P) Ltd. Bombay. Processing: Rajneesh Foundation. Poona. Printing: Usha Offset Printers. Bombay. Production: Ma Anand Parinita. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, December 1980. First Edition. 364 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 670 g. No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 21.06am – 30.06am 1978. 10 discourses. Subject: Sufism. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Darshan Diaries. Books on Bhagwan. Foreign Editions. Translations. Major Book Distributors and Suppliers. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.

Introduction by Ma Prem Maitri. Excerpt:
“Most of us haven’t an inkling of what it means to be with an enlightened Master. We’ve heard stories of Jesus and Gautama the Buddha, but they sit in our heads like paintings in the local museum. We’re never quite sure if it’s for real or just make-believe. Could it really be? Is the world as we experience it now only a miniscule specimen of what is?
I sit on the balcony of the house were Bhagwan lives. / The trees now / this afternoon, with hot wind and butterflies, / are more green than ever green was in my life. Green that / reaches my belly, my heart, / green touching way in my sex through my limbs and skin…..
Yes, there IS something utterly beyond the peripheral experience. There IS such a being as a Buddha. He is here. And these pages contain his words.
You will find something here unlike anything you’ve ever tasted before. A perfect Master is simply and amazingly a guide to the present. And Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh lives here in a moment where the vortex of compassion and disaster meet. Bhagwan is sitting silently in the center, in perfect relaxation between the polar tensions.
This book is based on a collection of Sufi stories; parables which subtly demonstrate the poignant truth. Sufis have always been exquisite master of the parable. Their sutras never say anything straight! What it is that they have to say can never be said straight. Rather it can be implied or indicated, but not said. And Bhagwan’s beautiful discussions of these stories are also but a hint…..
Each morning for two hours, amid the squeaks and chirps of exotic birds and creatures, Bhagwan meets with his sannyasins – disciples – and other seekers who have come from all around the world to be with him. He weaves his elegant, graceful song around the selected sutras each day, uplifting our souls and throwing us into the herenow. Here is the gift of ten days of his blessed music. The Sufi stories intertwined with five days of answers to our questions. This is a symphony!” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘When the Disciple is Ready’, on the first morning 21.06.1978.
“The Master appears only when the disciple is ready. Never otherwise. In no other way. At no other point in life’s journey. The disciple has to be ready and ripe; only at that moment does the Master become visible. The disciple has to earn eyes, to earn ears, to create a heart, to feel. How can the sun appear if you are blind? The sun may appear but you will go on missing it.
Unless you have eyes, there is no beauty in the world. The flowers will bloom, but not for you. And stars will fill the sky with immense beauty, but not for you. Unless you have eyes, there is no beauty in the world.
If you don’t have love in the heart, you will not find the beloved. The basic requirement has to be fulfilled. Only love finds the beloved. Eyes find beauty. And the ears find music and melodies.
But there are people, and they are many – the majority consists of those – who go on searching and seeking something out there without creating a corresponding receptivity in themselves. I have come across many seekers who are searching for a Master – not at all aware that the disciple is completely absent. The disciple is not there at all. How can you find a Master?
The Master is not just an objective phenomenon there. First he has to be something interior in you. That’s what disciplehood is: a preparation, a thirst, a passionate desire, a great passion for truth. That is lacking. And then people go on searching. And if they don’t find, it is not surprising. They are not going to find! They may come across many Masters, but they will go on missing.” (p. 7)

The last discourse in this series, ‘Hail Great Scholar!’, on 29.06.1978, (the last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 30.06.1978), is on knowledge, scriptures and scholarship, and it finishes with the words:
“Scholarship, to be a pundit, is not an attainment: it is a failure. It is a consolation only. You have missed the real treasure, and now you have just old dirty books – and that is a burden, not a liberation. Books cannot liberate. In fact, books themselves wait for somebody to liberate the truth from them – how can they liberate you?
When a Master is there, he liberates truths from the imprisonment of books. That’s why I have chosen so many books to speak upon. Many truths are imprisoned there – they have to be liberated. The book cannot liberate you; how can a dead book liberate you? Truth liberates. And if you know the truth, you can liberate truths from books too.
But remember: this is not possible if you only become a scholar. This is possible only when you become a sage. And who is a sage? A child again. A child who has consciously understood the futility of knowledge, and has understood the ultimate beauty of ignorance.” (p. 314)

* The Perfect Master. Talks on Sufi Stories. Volume 2 of 2. Editor and Compiler: Ma Yoga Anurag. Introduction: Sw Devabodhi. Design: Ma Anand Jen. Ma Anand Premda. Cover Design: Sw Govinddas. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Typesetting: Spads Phototype Setting Industries (P) Ltd. Bombay. Processing: Rajneesh Foundation. Poona. Printing: Army and Navy Press. Bombay. Binding: Rajneesh Foundation. Poona. Production: Ma Anand Parinita. Ma Anand Nirala. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, March 1981. First Edition. 352 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 705 g. ISBN 0-88050-114-6 (label). 5000 copies. Period: 01.07am – 10.07am 1978. 10 discourses. Subject: Sufism. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Publications from Rajneesh Foundation: Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Darshan Diaries. Books by Other Publishers: Books on Bhagwan. Foreign Editions in English: United States of America. United Kingdom. Translations. Major Book Distributors and Suppliers. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
From back flap: “Bhagwan is not a religion. The tradition of the Master is unique…. He doesn’t provide a belief, he stimulates freedom and a conscious attitude to life in the world of today.” (Niewe Revu. July 1980. Holland)
“Here in these pages is a record of that unique meeting: a meeting of ancient stories of the Sufi mystics with a modern Master bound by no school or tradition, but bursting with the freshness of his own awakened being.” (Books from India. Frankfurt Book Fair Catalogue. October 1980. India)

Introduction by Sw Devabodhi. Excerpts:
“”Sufis have a special name for him – they call him Khidr. Khidr simply means your innermost guide; it is not an outer phenomenon. It is not somebody outside – it is your own inner still small voice. If you are silent, you will hear it. If you are honest, you will hear it. If you are sincere, you cannot miss hearing it.”
The man who calls to us with these words, in this book, is Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Here, he uses the tales and images of the Sufi tradition as his vehicle. But he is a friend of many paths, and in his daily discourses in Poona, he has spoken on most of them. Yet the deep harmony of love and meditation in the world of the Sufis has brought him back again and again to these tough, tender, ecstatic, utterly pragmatic mystics…
This beautiful book is an invitation to discover yourself. It may be that something of the essential in you is reflected here within these pages; and in the clean, clear mirror of these stories and this Master, the voyage of discovery can begin.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Once Upon a Time’, on the first morning 01.07.1978.
“Sufism is not speculation – it is utterly practical. It is not a philosophy – it is very down-to-earth. Its roots are in the earth. It is not abstract, wholly thinking – it means business. It wants to transform people, not just to stuff their minds with futile, impotent ideas. And all ideas as such are impotent. They pretend much, but when you go deep into them, you will always find them empty of all reality. They promise, but they never deliver the goods. They cheat.
Philosophers have been the greatest cheats in the world. They create beautiful mansions in the air. They are artists in creating dreams. And those who become enchanted with those dreams are very unfortunate, because their lives will be wasted. And by the time they become aware that they have been chasing dreams, it will be too late. Änd there are a few people who never become aware of it. Their whole lives they remain engrossed in ideas, and they die engrossed in the ideas. They never come to face with reality. And it is only reality that liberates.
Truth liberates, not ideas. And truth is not an idea: truth is an experience.
Sufism is not an ‘ism’ as such. It is a practical methodology. It is alchemy. If you understand its ways, it is going to transmute you from lower metal to higher metal. It can take you to another reality. It can open doors to the ultimate. It is not interested in giving you great ideas. Its basic emphasis is how to give you a little more awareness. Even an ounce of awareness is far more valuable than the whole Himalayas of philosophy. An inch of becoming more conscious is far better than travelling thousands of miles in your dream.” (p. 7)

The last discourse in this series, ‘A Stranger to Yourself’, on 09.07.1978, (the last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 10.07.1978), finishes with the words:
“The man of God, a Sufi – the word ‘sufi’ comes from sufa; sufa means purity, cleanliness, clarity – the man of inner purity lives love in two dimensions. One is the private dimension, utterly private, personal, intimate, just as you love your woman, or your man – in seclusion. You don’t want it to be public. To make it public will be profane, will be sacrilegious, will be a crime. In meditation, in prayer, the Sufi contacts God in absolute privacy…
Pray to God, meditate on him, in secrecy, in privacy – alone.
And the other dimension is of service, of loving his creatures – the trees, the mountains, the people, the rivers. Pour your love openly to his world, and pour your love in privacy to him – and you become a Sufi.
And the function of a Master is to give you these two dimensions of love. And the Perfect Master is one in whose presence this process is triggered, and you start growing in these two dimensions of love. The ultimate crescendo of these two loves is freedom – freedom from misery, freedom from mind, freedom from body, freedom from coming again into the world – freedom from all kinds of imprisonments. That freedom is the goal.
Keep the goal always in your vision. And, slowly slowly, go on dropping all that goes against that vision. Fall in harmony with the vision of this ultimate goal of freedom. Become more and more free. And from the very first step one has to become free.
The real Master, the Perfect Master, about whom we have been talking all these twenty days – the Perfect Master helps you to become free, he gives you freedom. Love always gives freedom….” (p. 295)

* The Secret of Secrets. Talks by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh on The Secrets of the Golden Flower. Volume 1 of 2. Introduction by Ma Sagarpriya. Published by Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International, Antelope, Oregon, July 1982. First Edition. Printed in USA. 565 pages. No illustrations. Unbound. Size: 21,5×14 cm. Weight: 695 g. ISBN 0-88050-628-8. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 82-50464. Trademark registered. 5000 copies. $16.95. Period: 11.08am – 26.08am 1978. 16 discourses. Subject: Tao. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

No credits to editor etc mentioned in colophon. This volume is the first to be published in Oregon with discourses from Poona.
In Appendix on yellow paper: Books Published by Rajneesh Foundation International: The Discourses of Bhagwan Shree Rjneesh. Intimate Dialogues between the Master and His disciples. Other Titles. (The Orange Book, The Rajneesh Nothing Book, The Sound of Running Water). Books from Other Publishers: Editions in English. Books on Bhagwan (listed according to language). Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centres, Ashrams and Communes.
In colophon: “Excerpts from ‘The Secret of the Golden Flower: A Chinese Book of Life’ translated by Richard Wilhelm and Cary F. Baynes and reprinted by permission of Routledge and Kegan Paul Ltd., London, and Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc., New York.”
On back jacket: “What then is the message…It is this: that the key for liberation of man is to be found in the mystery of man himself, in his deepest and truest Self. ‘Man know thyself’ has been the call of the wise men of all ages. In order to teach man this message, Bhagwan unites Gestalt with Maslow and Assagioli, encounter with meditation, psychodrama with Zen and Yoga…
Indeed Bhagwan was convinced of the necessary transition of psychology to religion, knowing that this transition could only be brought about by a radical step, which starts a transformation…
Maybe Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is, after all, one of the keys of God’s providence in our times.” C.J.A. Tholens. Former Benedictine Abbot. Nieuwe Linie, 27.02.1982. Holland.
Volume 1 and 2 cover a successive series of 31 discourses 11.08-10.09.1978.

Introduction by Ma Sagarpriya. Excerpts:
“This series of lectures on the Taoist classic, The Secret of the Golden Flower, is a rare gift from Bhagwan…
Bhagwan lives up to his promise to share the secrets of ‘how’. First he unravels the many technical terms of Lu-tsu, predecessor of Lao Tzu; Lu-tsu’s sutras contain phrases like ‘the primal spirit’, ‘circulation of the light’, ‘backward-flowing movement’, ‘crystallization’, which even after translation from the ancient Chinese don’t make much sense to those not sharing Lu-tsu’s vantage point. Then Bhagwan explains the associated meditation techniques, involving things we are more familiar with like the eyes, the ears, the breath, the nose – particularly the ‘Jewish nose’ belonging to a large percentage of his sannyasins. In the process, many interesting facets of meditation are dealt with. For example, Bhagwan talks about how to watch one’s thoughts without falling into the traps of either fighting or following them. Also, he outlines the qualities of masculine and feminine energies as delineated by Lu-tsu and explains the importance of their relationship inside each person. He says: Right now your animus and anima are at war – that’s the problem. They have to be integrated; they have to learn how to enhance each other…
Transform your sexual energy into meditative energy – it is the same energy, just the direction changes: it flows no more downward and outward, it starts flowing inward and upward. And this same energy opens the bud of the Golden Flower in you. This is the whole secret…
This book will create a thirst in you to become what you are capable of becoming: crystallized, a Golden Flower like Bhagwan.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Animus and Anima’, on the first morning 11.08.1978.
“This book, The Secret of the Golden Flower, is one of the most esoteric treatises in the world. It will show you the way to become more than the body. It will show you the way to go beyond death. It will show you the way to bloom – how not to remain a seed but to become a Golden Flower. What in India we have called the one-thousand-petalled lotus, in China they call the Golden Flower. It is a symbol.
The flower represents perfection, totality. The flower represents the uttermost expression of the potential, the actualization of the potential. The flower represents the beauty, the grandeur, the splendour of being. And unless you have become a thousand-petalled lotus or a Golden Flower…
Remember you have to go far. Remember that you have to get out of the traps that the society has put around you. Remember that you have not yet done the work for which you have come to the earth. Remember you are just a seed, not yet a soul.
This treatise, The Secret of the Golden Flower, is very ancient – possibly one of the most ancient treatises in the world – certainly twenty-five centuries old, and the possibility is that it is older than that. But twenty-five centuries can be traced back very easily. And this treatise is also a great synthesis of all the great religions. That is rare, unique. The Bible belongs to the Christians, the Talmud belongs to the Jews, the Vedas belong to the Hindus, the Dhammapada to the Buddhists, the Tao Te Ching to the Taoists. But this small book, The Secret of the Golden Flower, belongs to no one in particular, it belongs to all.
It is deeply based in Taoist teachings. It is a flowering of the Taoist approach to life and existence. But it is not only that – Zarathustra has played a role. Zarathustra’s teachings have been incorporated in it. Buddhist teachings have also been incorporated in it. And a certain esoteric school of Christians, the Nestorians, they have also played their part. So Christianity and Judaism also have become part of it.
It is one of the most synthetical approaches. It combines all that is beautiful in all the traditions of the world. For centuries it was only transmitted orally, and the book remained esoteric. It was not available to the public because it has something very secret to teach; it was available only to the disciples. The Master would tell it to the disciple only when the time was ripe, because it gives you such a potential secret that if you don’t understand rightly, if you do something wrong with it, there are bound to be harmful effects from it. It has to be understood rightly, and it has to be worked at only in the presence of a Master. It is a powerful method – it is as powerful as atomic energy.” (p. 8. First chapter begins on p. 2 with a parable).

The last discourse in the series, ‘Beyond Indolence and Distraction’, on 25.08.1978, (the last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 26.08.1978), is commenting on the sutra by Lu-tsu on pages 490-491 and finishes with the words:
“If your hearing is inward, your seeing is inward – and that means you are feeling light without form, sound without sound, a silent music inside – your inner man and inner woman have met. This is the union, the total orgasm, unio mystica.
If, as a result of indolence, one becomes sleepy, one should stand up and walk about. When the mind has become clear one should sit down again. In the course of time there will be success without one’s becoming indolent and falling asleep.
These sutras have to be practised. Without practice, make efforts to enter into the secrets of these sutras. Without strain, learn to surrender and be in a let-go.” (p. 522)

* The Secret of Secrets. Talks by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh on The Secret of the Golden Flower. Volume 2 of 2. Editor: Ma Yoga Sudha. Introduction: Sw Anand Sugeet. Design: Ma Yoga Arpita. Printed in U.S.A. Direction: Ma Yoga Pratima. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, September 1983. First Edition. 519 pages. No illustrations. Paperback. Size: 18×11 cm. Weight: 375 g. ISBN 0-88050-629-6. Library of Congress Catalog Number 82-50464. 10.000 copies. $4.95. Period: 27.08am – 10.09am 1978. 15 discourses. Subject: Tao. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books Published by Rajneesh Foundation International: Discourses. Initiation Talks. Other Titles (‘Rajneeshism. An Introduction to Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and His Religion’. ‘The Sound of Running Water’. ‘The Orange Book’). Books from Other Publishers: English Editions. Foreign Language Editions. Books on Bhagwan are listed according to language. (Including ‘Sjælens Oprør’ by Sw Deva Satyarthi. Borgen. Denmark). Rajneesh Meditation Centres, Ashrams and Communes.
In colophon: “For the sutras quoted in this book we gratefully acknowledge the use of ‘The Secret of the Golden Flower – A Chinese Book of Life’, translated and explained by Richard Wilhelm with a foreword and commentary by C.G. Jung, translated from the German by Cary F. Baynes, published by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. Reprinted with the kind permission of the publisher.”
Volume 1 and 2 cover a successive series of 31 discourses 11.08-10.09.1978.
From back jacket: “Like an infinitely flowing river, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh has spoken on all the Masters of the world. In this book he speaks on ‘The Secret of the Golden Flower’ with a beauty and eloquence which is at times breathtaking, at times penetrating of one’s very being – and at other times simple, practical guides for daily living.” Cheurchan Hanson B.A., M.A. (Cantab)

Introduction by Sw Anand Sugeet. Excerpts:
“Here in Oregon, U.S.A., there is a self-actualized being who guides His disciples on a path of religion as practical as a locksmith’s keys. In this book, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh speaks on Lu-tsu’s ‘The Secret of the Golden Flower’, and unlocks one secret after another. The Tao becomes alive, the mysterious shrouds fall away from a most venerable Master of Tao. Suddenly the relevance, the sheer utility of these age old sutras lies revealed. But there’s something more going on here.
To be with Bhagwan is to be with a living Lu-tsu, a living Christ, a living Kabir. He has the unique ability of not only demystifying long-gone Masters, but showing how each relates to the others. Bhagwan’s penetrating vision brings Lu-tsu alive…
In the mystery of His very being, slowly I come to share His joy, His celebration. This book is a gift – take it and feel what Bhagwan is saying. Herein truly is The Secret of Secrets. Let Bhagwan show you the Tao, the Way – your life will never be the same.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘A Little Bit of Sky’, on the first morning 27.08.1978.
“Bliss is man’s intrinsic nature. It has not to be attained, it has only to be rediscovered. We already have it. We are it. Searching for it somewhere else is a sure way to miss it. Stop searching and look within, and the greatest surprise of your life is awaiting you there, because whatsoever you have been seeking down the ages, through so many lives, is already the case. You need not be a beggar, you are born emperor. But the Kingdom of God is within you and your eyes go on searching without, hence you go on missing. It is behind the eyes, not in front of the eyes.
The Kingdom of God is not an object, it is your very subjectivity. It is not to be sought because it is the very nature of the seeker. And then, even in the darkest forest, utterly alone in a cave, one can be happy. Otherwise even palaces only create misery.” (p. 3)

The last discourse in the series, ‘Where the Positive and Negative Meet’, on 08.09.1978, (the two last discourses are with Questions and Answers on 09.09-10.09.1978), finishes with the words:
“Sex is gross because it is the lowest rung of your ladder. As energies move upwards a totally different kind of beauty and grace arises in you, which is divine. You become less and less of the body and more and more of the spirit.
If you can do this simple method [breathing deeply in the morning and visualizing great light entering you] for three months, you will be surprised: there is no need to repress. Transformation has started happening.
‘A man who holds to the way of conservation all through life may reach the stage of the Golden Flower…’
And if you can go on doing this for your whole life, one day it is going to happen.
The Master Lu-tsu says ‘your whole life’ so that you remain patient. It can happen any day, it can happen today, or tomorrow, or the day after tomorrow. It depends with what intensity, with what sincerity you work for it, with what longing, what totality you go into it. And the day the Golden Flower blooms in you is the day of Buddhahood. You have attained the greatest treasure there is.
‘A man who holds to the way of conservation all through life may reach the stage of the Golden Flower, which then frees the ego from the conflict of the opposites, and it again becomes part of the Tao, the undivided great One’.
From Tao to Tao, from One to One – as Plotinus says, “The flight of the alone to the alone.” (p. 442)

* The Secret. Discourses on Sufism. Editing: Sw Prem Chinmaya. Ma Yoga Sudha. Compilation: Sw Prem Chinmaya. Introduction: Sw Deva Abhiyana. Design: Ma Prem Sarva. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Processing: Rajneesh Foundation Limited. Printing: Tata Press Limited. Bombay. Production: Ma Deva Layo. Ma Prem Upasana. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, March 1980. First Edition. 750 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 1330 g. No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 11.10am – 31.10am 1978. 21 discourses. Subject: Sufism. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rjneesh. Darshan Diaries. Translations. Foreign Editions. Books on Bhagwan. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
This volume on 750 pages covers a discourse series on 21 successive mornings 11.10-31.10.1978. The printing is in a somewhat lower quality from Tata Press.
On back jacket: “he himself is the / essence of his message / that transcendence / is available / that it can be attained / through surrender / love and awareness // he is that / you can be that / thou art that” From “Dying for Enlightenment”. By: Bernard Gunther [Sw Deva Amit Prem], Ph.D., Psychologist, Author, “Sense Relaxation” and “What To Do Until The Messiah Comes””
From front flap: “The power and love of Bhagwan are instantly available to the trusting heart but profoundly elusive to the inquisitive mind. Words are too slow and heavy to capture him – even his words in this book are only what remains after he has been and gone – the tracks he leaves in Poona’s high-energy bubble chamber. But to them clings enough of his magic to transform you totally and forever if you allow it to.” M.J. Mellish, Ph.D.
On back flap: “Salih of Qazwan taught his disciples: Whoever knocks at the door continually, it will be opened to him. Rabiya, hearing him one day, said: How long will you say, it will be opened? The door has never been shut.”
Such an outpouring of parable, succinctly stated and lovingly illuminated, of transcendental psychology and wit, of lyrically compassionate depiction of the human condition, invites the compassion of this book (or properly speaking, its author) to that miraculously open door. The special success of this book, is that it conveys so well an atmosphere, and experience of personal contact. As Bhagwan says, ‘A master does not teach. He is the teaching.'” Book Review, SUFI TIMES. July 1978.
“Rajneesh, who is drawing many Europeans to India, expounds the theme of personal evolution with traditional Sufi unsentimentality, but also with a twinkling sense of humour.” THE EVENING NEWS (London)
“Rajneesh’s commentary was especially moving because not only was his scholarship impeccable and his insight illuminating, but his listeners grasped that they were being guided into hitherto inconceivable categories of experience and awareness where there were no familiar signposts or handholds.” Tom Buchan. THE SCOTSMAN. August 1, 1978. Scotland.
“There is no God but God” (p. 1)

Introduction by Sw Deva Abhiyana. Excerpts:
“The Secret. Sshh.
This is not really a book. It is more of a dance. And not an ordinary dance. It is a Sufi whirlwind from the heart…
Many of us here first fell in love with this mad dervish Bhagwan through his printed words, so don’t let this innocuous little book fool you…. Let it fill you. Get lost into it. Go totally into the dance.
Going through it, a bridge can happen between that outer form dancing and the inner being silently resting. That moment of transcendence allows the impossibility of true transformation.
This book is a song, a remembrance, an embrace, a longing – zhikr.. for that secret moment. La illaha ill Allah. Nothing else exists” (p. vii)

Opening discourse by Osho,’ La illaha ill Allah’, on the first morning 11.10.1978.
“La illaha ill Allah – There is no God but God. This is the fundamental essence of the way of the Sufis. This is the seed. Out of this seed has grown the Bodhi Tree of Sufism. In this small proclamation, all that is valuable in all the religions is contained: God is and only God is.
This statement makes God synonymous with existence. God is the very isness of all that is. God is not separate from his creation. The creator is in his creation; there is no duality, there is no distance, so whatsoever you come across is God. The trees and the rivers and the mountains, all are manifestations of God. You and the people you love, and the people you hate, all are manifestations of God.
This small statement can transform your whole life. It can change the very gestalt of your vision. The moment one recognizes that all is one, love arises on its own accord. And love is Sufism.
Sufism is not concerned with knowledge. Its whole concern is love, intense, passionate love: how to fall in love with the whole, how to be in tune with the whole, how to bridge the distance between the creation and the creator.
The so-called, organized religions of the world teach a kind of duality, that the creator is separate from the creation, that the creator is higher than the creation, that there is something wrong with creation, it has to be renounced. Sufis don’t renounce, they rejoice. And that’s what I am teaching you here: Rejoice!
My sannyas is a way of rejoicing, not a way of renunciation.
Rumi has said:
If you are not one with the Beloved
Seek!
And if you are in Union,
Rejoice!
This assembly is a Sufi assembly. You are my Sufis, the Sufis of the new age. I am introducing you to the world of love. I am initiating you into the ways of love.” (p. 6)

The last discourse in the series, ‘The Secret’, on 31.10.1978 finishes with the words:
“La illaha ill Allah – there is no God but God. There is no goal but the goal. And the paradox is that the goal is in the source. You have it already within you. It is there, vibrating, pulsating in your being. Don’t go anywhere. Move into privacy, into secrecy, into your own innermost chamber. Don’t talk about it. Let it be a secret. If it becomes unbearable, talk to your Master; otherwise keep it a secret. Let the secret go deeper and deeper into the soil of your heart. Let it reach to the very core. Only when it reaches to the core, one becomes aflame.
Then only God is: La illaha ill Allah!” (p. 734)

* Unio Mystica. Talks by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh on Hakim Sanai’s ‘The Hadiqa’. Volume 1 of 2. Editor and Compiler: Ma Ananda Vandana. Introduction: Ma Ananda Vandana. Design: Sw Deva Udgam. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Composed and Printed by Vakil and Sons Ltd. Bombay. Production: Ma Anand Parinita. Ma Anand Nirala. Ma Prem Tushita. Ma Anand Jen. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, December 1980. First Edition. 371 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 660 g. No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 01.11am – 10.11am 1978. 10 discourses. Subject: Sufism. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rjneesh. Darshan Diaries. Miscellaneous (Including: The Song Book. Drinking From Your Wine, Bhagwan. Songs from the Ashram music group). Books on Bhagwan. Foreign Editions in English. Translations. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
In colophon: “We gratefully acknowledge the use of the sutras of Hakim Sanai taken from ‘THE WALLED GARDEN OF TRUTH’, translated by David Pendlebury.”

Introduction by Ma Ananda Vandana:
“Should you wonder what happened to the king’s poet,
Hakim Sanai, when he looked into the eyes of the mystic
madman, Lai-Khur, turn through the pages,
and you will find a picture of the mystic Sufi,
Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, singer of the ten songs that fill the
pages of this book, and fall for a moment into the
unfathomable darkness of his eyes….
In a garden in India, a Guest has come to stay for a while:
The shining presence of a Sufi graces this oasis
where the trees grow wild and high.
Extravagant greenness gushes from the ground around his feet,
flowers burst passionately pink and purple
and in every cuckoo’s call there’s a thrilling urgency.
He sits here, a shimmering shadow of brightness,
stroking the air around him into songs and laughter.
Prides of hearts throng enthralled around him:
Here he has a million mystics in the making.
At the sound of his voice, ecstatic electricity rushes
like lightning along listening limbs,
and one glance from those eyes can startle up a shower of tears
washing eyes clear of the dust of ages.
And now his songs are blowing on gales of gladness
to far and distant corners of this earth
calling long-forgetful friends still stumbling in sands of slumber
home to the Garden, land of their hearts.
Of Hakim Sanai’s ‘Hadiqa: The Walled Garden of Truth’ Bhagwan says,
“This book was not written, this book is a gift from God.
This book is a gift from God
and a gratitude from Hakim Sanai
to that strange madman, Lai-Khur.”
In Unio Mystica, a living Lai-Khur breathes fresh fire and fragrance into the satori songburst of another enlightened poet.
We so easily revere the past and appreciate the beautiful utterances of a poet dead for centuries, It seems more difficult to get it –
that between these very covers lie the literally living
words of en enlightened mystic Sufi master to be heard right
now singing out his heart.
Says Sanai:
He introduced himself to us
out of kindness…
Yes, out of kindness, God consents to grace this Poona garden.
Around him, dancing their delight
a million moths are drawn to the fire of his eyes.
Their hearts burning in love of this flame,
on storm-battered wings they flutter from the darkness
come into the light of the Garden.
Remember, this is work entrusted,
Remember, beloved, we shall meet again…
To bask in the presence of a Buddha,
to warm the soul within the radiance of a Lai-Khur,
is to begin to remember something…
something long long distant and forgotten…
and there comes a feeling that he not only knows
but he is what we have forgotten –
that to fall into the welling darkness of his eyes
is to fall into the swelling whirlpool of your own heart,
and beyond each single heart’s wings
and behind his eyes
there is only the infinitely throbbing swell
of the sea of mystic union.”
(No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Polishing the Mirror of the Heart’, on the first morning 01.11.1978.
“Hakim Sanai: This name is as sweet to me as honey, as sweet as nectar. Hakim Sanai is unique, unique in the world of Sufism. No other Sufi has been able to reach to such heights of expression and such depths of penetration. Hakim Sanai has been able to do almost the impossible.
If we were to save only two books from the whole world of the mystics, then these would be the two books. One would be from the world of Zen, the path of awareness: Sosan’s Hsing Hsing Ming. I have spoken on it; it contains the quintessence of Zen, of the path of awareness and meditation. The other book would be Hakim Sanai’s Hadiqatu’l Haqiqat: The Walled Garden of Truth – in short, The Hadiqa: The Garden. This is the book we are entering today.
The Hadiqa is the essential fragrance of the path of love. Just as Sosan has been able to catch the very soul of Zen, Hakim Sanai has been able to catch the very soul of Sufism. Such books are not written, they are born. Nobody can compose them. They are not manufactured in the mind, by the mind; they come from the beyond. They are a gift. They are born as mysteriously as a child is born, or a bird or a rose flower. They come to us, they are gifts.” (p. 4)

The last discourse in the series, ‘A Wedding and a Wake’, on 09.11.1978, (the last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 10.11.1978), finishes with the words:
“In the night you cannot see because it is dark. In ignorance you cannot see because you are ignorant, and in knowledge you cannot see because your knowledge covers your eyes. The ignorant is suffering because he is ignorant, and the knowledgeable is suffering because he is knowledgeable.
Drop both! – ignorance and knowledge. Simply be utterly clean of both, knowledge and ignorance: just be an opening.
And in that opening comes the great guest, in that opening you become the host. God is ready to penetrate you, but either your ignorance prevents him or your knowledge prevents him.
Remember, innocence is the absence of both ignorance and knowledge. The innocent man is not aware that he knows, is not aware that he does not know. He is simply a pure mirror, reflecting whatsoever is the case.
Become a pure mirror: that’s what meditation is all about.” (p. 232)

* Unio Mystica. Talks by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh on Hakim Sanai’s ‘The Hadiqa’. Volume 2 of 2. Editor and Compiler: Ma Ananda Vandana. Introduction: Ma Anand Parinita. Design: Sw Deva Udgam. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Composed and Printed by Vakil and Sons Ltd. Bombay. Production: Ma Anand Parinita. Ma Anand Nirala. Ma Prem Tushita. Ma Anand Urmila. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, March 1981. First Edition. 356 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 640 g. ISBN 0-88050-164-2 (label). 1000 hardbound copies and 4000 paperback copies. Period: 11.12am – 20.12am 1978. 10 discourses. Subject: Sufism. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Darshan Diaries. Miscellaneous. Books on Bhagwan. Foreign Editions in English. Translations. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
In colophon: “We gratefully acknowledge the use of the sutras of Hakim Sanai taken from ‘THE WALLED GARDEN OF TRUTH’, translated by David Pendlebury.”
On back jacket: “… Rajneesh has spoken of Jesus in a way which has brought tears to the eyes of Christians, of Gautama the Buddha in a manner which brings that remote Master out of the murk of twenty centuries. As for the Islamic tradition, Bhagwan holds his hearers captive and laughing with superb Sufi stories and maxims.” The Australian. February 1981. Australia.
From back flap: “…Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh may indeed be among the rarest mortal beings.
He has been teaching almost every morning in Poona to ever-increasing numbers of disciples and visitors for six years. His range of reference, mood and approach can be dazzling. He seems to have absorbed the essential message of every Eastern spiritual master and of most Western philosophers and psychologists as well.” The Australian. February 1981. Australia.

Introduction by Ma Anand Parinita. Excerpts:
“Flowers upon flowers of love and wisdom and joy and guidance; these were the gifts from the Master during the cool mornings of December, 1978. Gifts of sheer ecstasy from our Sufi Master dancing in the garden of Hakim Sanai. A pas-de-deux of life in its infinite rhythms danced for our benefit – awakening the seeds of our own inner gardens…
Sitting here, in this garden, amongst the greens and the
golds and the many varied bloomings of roses and lotuses
and sunflowers, there is growth, there is movement. People
are blossoming, the in and out are merging and playing
in such resplendent harmony. We are learning to dance –
the dawning dance of the soul.
Reading these words is refreshing. It is like standing at the
foot of a rainbow after a summer’s shower… and smelling
the earth for the first time.
And tiptoeing across the squelching grass,
and watching the drips slip from shiny green leaves
and resting and breathing in the coolness
and feeling nourished and blessed
to be in such a garden, a paradise…”
(No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘On the Road of Sighs’, on the first morning 11.12.1978.
“Truth is not a tradition. It cannot be, because truth is never old. It is eternally new, it is eternally fresh, as fresh as the dewdrops in the morning or the stars in the night.
The claim of tradition is basically anti-truth. The word ‘tradition’ comes from a root ‘tradere’. It means ‘handed by someone to somebody else, transferred.’ From ‘tradere’ also comes the word ‘trade’. Truth cannot be transferred from one person to another person. It is impossible to transfer it. It is not a thing, hence it is not transferable. It cannot be traded, nobody can give it, nobody can take it. It arises in each individual’s own being, it is a flowering of your own heat.
Hence, Sufism is not a tradition. No true religion can ever be a tradition; every true religion is bound to be a revolution, a rebellion. Sufism is one of the most profound, most authentic experiments and enquiries into truth that has happened on this earth. And Hakim Sanai, into whose sutras we will be entering again today, is one of the three greatst Sufis in the whole history of human consciousness. He makes up the trio of the three great masters, Attar, Rumi and Sanai.
For a few days, you will be moving again with one of the greatest souls. It is a pilgrimage, a holy pilgrimage; you will be walking on sacred ground. Be very alert, watchful, loving, open, vulnerable, then something can arise in you which can become a transformation; something can be triggered in you. But remember, it is not caused from the outside, it is not a question of cause and effect. Hence it is beyond the reach of science. Science can only understand the law of cause and effect. If something can be caused, it is bound to fall into the field of science. But truth cannot be caused…
These few days, walking with Hakim Sanai, can be life-transforming. You will be here with one of the greatest human beings ever – a human being of the calibre of Buddha, Jesus and Mohammed.
But remember, the first thing, truth is not a tradition. If you believe in tradition, you will never come to know what truth is. Tradition is a belief, borrowed; it is knowledge but not experience. Tradition is scripture, philosophy, words and words – words and words about words. It is a great jungle of theories, and you can be deceived by it very easily. The mind is ready to fall into the trap of it.” (p. 4)

The last discourse in the series, ‘Beyond the Shadows’, on 19.12.1978, (the last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 20.12.1978), finishes on page 307 with the words:
“If you really want God, you have to disappear. This is the problem; people want God, but they don’t want to disappear. They want to possess God as they possess other properties. Hence they can go on searching for thousand of lives but they will not find God, because they will not fulfil the basic requirement.
This is the basic requirement: Unself yourself…
And immediately God starts showering on you, instantly. The whole world becomes luminous; immediately all is celebration. Remember this key of Hakim Sanai. This is a master key: this can open the doors of all the mysteries. Unself yourself.”

* Philosophia Perennis. Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Speaking on The Golden Verses of Pythagoras. Volume 1 of 2. Editor: Ma Yoga Anurag. Compilation: Ma Ananda Vandana. Ma Yoga Anurag. Introduction; Ma Yoga Anurag. Design: Sw Anand Subhadra. Ma Prem Namra. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Calligraphy: Sw Sat Samudaya. Processing: Sw Anand Vijayo. Rajneesh Foundation. Poona. Typesetting and Printing: Tata Press, Bombay. Production: Ma Deva Layo. Sw Prem Prasthan. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, July 1981. First Edition. 379 pages. Illustrated. Unbound. Size: 21,5×14 cm. Weight: 650 g. No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 21.12am – 30.12am 1978. 10 discourses. Subject: Western Mystics. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Publications From Rajneesh Foundation. Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Darshan Diaries. Miscellaneous. Books on Bhagwan. Books by Other Publishers. Books on Bhagwan. Editions in English (India. Dimensions Beyond the Known. Orient Paperbacks). Translations. Major Book Distributors and Suppliers. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
Title from Huxley: The Perennial Philosophy / Aldous Huxley (1945).
In colophon: “For the sayings of Pythagoras quoted in this book grateful acknowledgement is given to The Golden Verses of Pythagoras by Fabre d’Olivet, published by Samuel Weiser, New York, 1975.”
Unbound in white cover. Photographs are of Osho speaking in discourses. Trademark registered in India and other countries. Sutras are printed also in Greek.

Introduction by Ma Yoga Anurag. Excerpts:
“When I first heard Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh I began to understand my confusion and frustration. The ring of truth sounded loud and clear and he put into words how I felt and why. He brought me a mental clarity and understanding, and instead of groping in the dark I took the hand he proffered. At first crawling and stumbling, I slowly began hoping and then dancing in tune with the hidden harmony of existence to which he opened my ears and eyes…
My dream has come true. I’ve found a man who not only understands me but who knows me through and through, who loves unconditionally and has opened my heart, who has told me to be myself – which no one ever did before. And now I am happy as never before – not without going through the agony of the birth pains, but for the new man to be born, and for the ecstasy, the birth is bound to be painful.
And this is not only so for one or two individuals: I am surrounded by thousands of people who have reached for the stars and are now flying and laughing and roaring and rolling and dancing and singing into unimagined reaches of ecstasy – even the sky is not the limit.
The new man is born. / Here and now. / Who Bhagwan is, / What he is, / How he does it / … who knows? / All I can do / Is open my heart / In wonder and awe / And be swept away / – dissolved, melted, merged – / On his tidal wave of love / In his infinite ocean of… // Thank you Bhagwan.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘The Greatest Luxury’, on the first morning 21.12.1978.
“Phythagoras represents the eternal pilgrim for philosophia perennis – the perennial philosophy of life. He is a sleeker [seeker] of truth par excellence. He staked all that he had for the search. He travelled far and wide, almost the whole known world of those days, in search of the Masters, of the mystery schools, of any hidden secrets. From Greece he went to Egypt – in search of the lost Atlantis and its secrets.
In Egypt, the great library of Alexandria was still intact. It had all the secrets of the past preserved. It was the greatest library that had ever existed on the earth; later on it was destroyed by a Mohammedan fanatic. The library was so big that when it was burnt, for six months the fire continued.
Just twenty-five centuries before Pythagoras, a great continent, Atlantis, had disappeared into the ocean. The ocean that is called ‘Atlantic’ is so called because of that continent, Atlantis.” (p. 4)

The last discourse in the series, ‘Logos: Power: Necessity’, on 26.12.1978, (last four discourses, 27.12-30.12.1978, are all with Questions and Answers), finishes with the words:
“If Error triumph, he departs and waits.
And there is no necessity that you will triumph because you have the truth with you. Jesus was crucified – that is truth crucified! Socrates was poisoned – that is truth poisoned. So don’t go on thinking that if you have the truth you are going to win. The herd mind believes in its own ignorance, in its own blindness, in its own superstitions. And the herd mind is powerful; it is the majority on the earth.
So if Error triumph… there is every possibility that error will triumph… then the wise man, the philosopher, departs – depart into himself – and waits… waits for the right moment. He is not angry, he is not frustrated. He does not expect that truth will win. Whatsoever happens he accepts it, and waits for the right moment. If the right moment arises, he will declare the truth again.
But he is always waiting. It is none of his business to impose himself on people – he never imposes. He loves and respects people and their freedom and their dignity and their choice. He has no idea of dominating people. He waits….
It has always been so. The Master waits for the disciple to come. The real Master always waits for the disciple to come. In fact, he never goes in search of the disciple, because that will somehow be imposing himself upon others. Those who are thirsty are bound to come. If they come, good – he shares whatsoever he has. If they don’t come, it is perfectly good… it is their freedom to come or not to come.” (p. 216)

Laust: Bibliography 1974 – 1981 Discourses in English – Fortsat

1979 Talks in Buddha Hall

* Philosophia Perennis. Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Speaking on The Golden Verses of Pythagoras. Volume 2 of 2. Editor: Ma Yoga Anurag. Compilation: Ma Ananda Vandana. Ma Yoga Anurag. Introduction: Ma Yoga Anurag. Design: Sw Anand Subhadra. Ma Prem Namra. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Calligraphy: Sw Sat Samudaya. Processing: Sw Anand Vijayo. Rajneesh Foundation. Poona. Typesetting and Printing: Tata Press, Bombay. Production: Ma Anand Savita. Ma Anand Nirala. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, July 1981. First Edition. 413 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×14 cm. Weight: 700 g. No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 31.12am – 10.01am 1979. 11 discourses. Subject: Western Mystics. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Publications From Rajneesh Foundation. Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Darshan Diaries. Miscellaneous. Books on Bhagwan. Books by Other Publishers. Books on Bhagwan. Editions in English. Translations (English translated from the original Hindi. The Heartbeat of the Absolute. Arnold Heinemann, India). Major Book Distributors and Suppliers. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
On front cover, in circular golden embossed print: “50th Birthday Dec 11, 1931 Dec 11, 1981 Special Publication Golden Celebration”
In colophon: “For the sayings of Pythagoras quoted in this book grateful acknowledgement is given to ‘The Golden Verses of Pythagoras’ by Fabre d’Olivet, published by Samuel Weiser, New York, 1975.”
New colophon has been glued covering the original one. It tells:
“Published by Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International. Rajneeshpuram Neo-Sannyas International Commune. P.O. Box 12A. Antelope. Oregon 97001. USA.
First Edition December 1981. 5,000 copies…
Printed in India. Bound in USA. ISBN: 0-88050-616-4 (label).”
Pythagoras’ verses are in Greek and English both.
Verses and first 12 pages are missing in some copies.

Introduction by Ma Yoga Anurag. Excerpt:
“Okay, let’s go!
And here we go into words which have been descended from the heights of that flight, from the lips of one whose feet never touch the ground. It’s not that he gives us wings but he awakens us to the fact that we have them, that we too can fly, that freedom is our birthright and our essence.
Bhagwan is that essence personified. Through his every pore breathes the vastness of the cosmos. He is a hollow bamboo on which the flute of existence is playing – the tune is catchy if your resistance is low, and it can resonate the inner chambers of your heart, seeing through the crusty layers of fear and doubt, of decay and imprisonment in which we live.
The words he speaks are themselves an introduction, an invitation to the dance of life, the joy of existence, the celebration of being. His love will lead you in….” (p. IX)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘The Golden Mean’, on the first morning 31.12.1978.
“Pythagoras also introduced the word ‘Cosmos’. ‘Cosmos’ means order, rhythm, harmony. Existence is not a chaos but a cosmos. Pythagoras has contributed much to human thought, to human evolution. His vision of cosmos became the very foundation of all scientific investigation.
Science can exist only if existence is a cosmos. If it is a chaos, there is no possibility of any science. If laws change every day, every moment – one day the water evaporates at one hundred degrees, another day at five hundred degrees – if water functions in a whimsical way and follows no order, how can there be a science?
Science presupposes that existence functions in a consistent way, in a rational way, that existence is not mad, that if we search deep into existence, we are bound to find laws – and those laws are the keys to all the mysteries.
Just as it is true for science, so it is true for religion too – because religion is nothing but the science of the inner. The outer science is called science; the inner science is called religion – but both can exist only in a cosmos.
There are laws of the inner world. Those laws have been discovered just as much as scientific laws have been discovered. Neither have scientific laws been invented, nor have religious laws been invented. Truth is – you need not invent it. And whatsoever you invent will be untrue – all inventions are lies.
Truth has to be discovered, not invented. Einstein discovered a certain law; Patanjali also discovered a certain law; Newton discovers gravitation, Krishna discovers grace – both are laws. One belong to the earth, the other belongs to the sky; one belongs to the world of necessity, the other belongs to the world of power. One belongs to the visible and the other belongs to the invisible.
It is in the vision of a cosmos that Pythagoras became the originator of a scientific concept of the world. He was the first scientist because he provided the very foundation. His idea of cosmos has to be understood, because without understanding it you will not be able to understand what he is talking about.
The inner world, the world of the spirit, follows certain laws, and those laws are unchangeable, they are perennial. Hence I have called this series ‘Philosophia Perennis’ – the perennial philosophy. Those laws are not time-bound, they are beyond time. Time itself functions within those laws. If you want to do something in the outside world, you will need to know how the outer existence functions, because unless you know how it functions you are bound to fail.” (pp. 4-5)

The last discourse in the series, ‘Only God Is’, on 10.01.1979 finishes with the words:
“To be a God is your destiny. But remember, it is not a goal, it is already the case. You are Gods because there is nothing else but God. The whole existence is overflowing with godliness. God is green in the trees and red and gold. God is in the winds and the songs that happen when the winds pass through the pine trees. God is in the roaring waves of the ocean, and in the clouds and in the lightening. God is, only God is! God is in you, in the neighbour, in your child.
But first you have to recognize God in you, then you will be able to recognize him everywhere. Once he is known within, he is known without too. And to know God within and without is to know truth, is to know freedom – is to know all that is worth knowing.” (p. 390)

* The Book of Wisdom. Discourses on Atisha’s Seven Points of Mind Training. Volume 1 of 2. Introduction: NN. Processed by Rajneesh Foundation International. Phototypesetting: Spads Phototype Setting Industries (P) Ltd. Bombay. Printing: Electrographic Industries (D.B. Taraporevala Sons & Co. Pvt. Ltd.). Bombay. Binding: Four Ocean Publishers Pvt. Ltd. Bombay. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International, Rajneeshpuram, March 1983. First Edition. Paperback. 391 pages. 7000 copies. Size: 19×12,5 cm. Weight: 390 g. ISBN: 0-88050-530-3. Library of Congress Catalog Number 82-21602. Period: 11.02am – 26.02am 1979, 16 discourses. Subject: Buddhist Masters. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

No mentioning of the crew behind this production.
“Excerpts are reprinted from: ‘A Direct Path to Enlightenment’ by Jam-mGon Kong-sPrul published by Ken McLeod, Vancouver, Canada.”
The first sutra is on page 289; preceding chapters are all with Questions/Answers.
On back flap:
“This new age of expanding awareness greatly needs a continuing example of welded East and West. Rajneesh has combined wisdom from almost all Eastern religions, he has utilized thoughts and methods from some Western philosophies and psychological techniques.” Connections, August 1982.
“Even without words, Rajneesh remains a powerful leader of one of our times’ fastest-growing religious movements.” Books and Author’s Review. Harper and Row. San Francisco, July 1982.
Appendix on orange paper: Books Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. Books from other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes.

Introduction. Excerpts:
“Bhagwan has found people ready to journey with him – they are the audience to whom these lectures were given, sannyasins and visiting friends. On them he pours his love by answering questions and by sharing a modern interpretation of the instructions given by Atisha, an enlightened master from Tibet, for the journey towards unborn, undying awareness. But even as he speaks, the message has not to do with ideas but with the presence that spreads from him as he speaks- he is what he is talking about, moment after moment after moment. He is doing the impossible: sharing the wordless through words, saying aloud something which can best be said through silence…
We are fortunate. We have his words – and his silence. “Please get ready as soon as possible, so that we can just be together…”” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Atisha the Thrice Great’, on the first morning 11.02.1979.
“Religion is not a science… Religion is not a science in the sense physics, mathematics and chemistry are sciences. But still it is a science because it is the ultimate knowing: the word “science” means knowing. And if religion is not a science, what else can be? – it is the highest knowing, it is the purest knowing.
Ordinary science is knowledge, not knowing: religion is knowing itself. Ordinary science is object-oriented – it knows something, hence it is knowledge. Religion is not object-oriented; it has no object, it knows nothing. Knowing knows itself, as if the mirror is reflecting itself. It is utterly pure of all content. Hence religion is not knowledge but knowing.
Science is a lower kind of knowing, religion is a higher kind. Religion is philosophia ultima: the ultimate knowing. The difference between the two is not of the spirit – the spirit is the same – but the difference is certainly of purity.
Science is mixed with much mud. Religion is pure essence, pure fragrance. The mud has disappeared, the lotus has disappeared, only the fragrance abides. These are the three stages of knowing: the mud, the lotus and the fragrance.
Religion cannot be grasped, because there is no object in it. But still it can be understood. It cannot be explained, but it can be experienced. There is no way of informing you about religion, because it cannot be reduced to information. But you can be shown the way, the path to it – fingers pointing to the moon. The fingers are not the moon, obviously, but the fingers can point to the moon.
These “Seven Points of Mind Training” of the great Master, Atisha, are fingers, seven fingers pointing to the moon. Don’t be caught by the fingers, don’t become too much obsessed with the fingers. That is not the point, that will be missing the point. Use the fingers and forget them, and look where they are pointing. And when you see the moon, who bothers about the fingers? Who remembers them? They automatically become non-essential; they disappear.
That’s why for those who have experienced religion, all the scriptures become utterly useless, all methods become non-essential. When the goal is achieved, the path is forgotten.” (p. 1)

* The Book of Wisdom. Discourses on Atisha’s Seven Points of Mind Training. Volume 2 of 2. Editor: Sw Krishna Prabhu. Introduction: Sw Anand Rajen. Design: Ma Prem Tushita. Direction: Ma Yoga Pratima. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International, Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, September 1984. Printed in U.S.A. First edition. 408 pages. No illustrations. Paperback. Size: 18×11 cm. Weight: 295 g. ISBN 0-88050-531-1. Library of Congress Catalog Number 82-23142. 10.000 copies. $5.95. Period: 27.02am – 10.03am 1979. 12 discourses. Subject: Buddhist Masters. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. Academy of Rajneeshism Titles (Including Rajneeshism, an introduction to Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and His religion (published in English, German, Italian and Japanese. The Book, an introduction to the teachings of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Series I from A-H Series II from I-Q Series III from P-Z). Then follow publications in alphabetical order according to subject. Initiation Talks. Photobiographies (This Very Place The Lotus Paradise, a photobiography of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and His work, 1978-1984). Books From Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Books on Bhagwan, according to Language. (The Awakened One: The Life and Work of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh by Sw Satya Vedant, Harper & Row. Begegnung mit Niemand by Mascha Rabben (Ma Hari Chetana), Herzschlag Verlag. Wenn das Herz frei wird by Ma Prem Gayan (Silvie Winter), Herbig. Der Erwachte by Vasant Joshi, Synthesis Verlag. Rajneeshpuram – Fest des Foiedeus und der Liebe. Sannyas Verlag). Rajneesh Meditation Centres, Ashrams and Communes.
On back cover: “My emphasis is also exactly the same as Atisha’s. You come to me with thousand-and-one problems, but my answer is always the same. If you come with anger, I say be aware of it. If you come with greed, I say be aware of it. If you come with lust, I say be aware of it. Because awareness cuts the very root. What is the root? Unawareness is the root…
Unawareness is the root of all illnesses. The awareness is the only medicine.” Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. The Book of Wisdom, Vol. II.
“I have found Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh to be a person of unique ability and wisdom. He is a true teacher in that he is not just repeating something read or related, but rather he is passing on the knowledge of his direct experience.” Richard Beymer. Actor, Director. Hollywood, California.

Introduction by Anand Rajen:
“Q: “Bhagwan, who are you, and what are you doing?”
A: “I am not. And I am not doing anything at all…”
This is how Bhagwan brings to a conclusion this series of discourses on the teachings of Atisha. It is over five years since He gave these talks. Their freshness and appropriateness is such that it could be less than five minutes ago!
Yes, we love to read His words or listen to tapes of His discourses, for He is a heart-opening delight in whatever form He is available. And there is always a ripple of excitement at the appearance of yet another volume of His words. But the real magic of Bhagwan is in His meaning:
“The verbal communication is only an introduction for the non-verbal. The non-verbal is an energy communication. Non-verbally, through silence, through energy, (the Master) communicates with the disciple. And then there comes the ultimate unity where neither communication nor communion is needed, but oneness has been achieved – where the Master and the disciple become one…” This is what He means! This book reflects the deepest expression of love, awareness, truth and freedom.
What Bhagwan talks about in these chapters is actually happening! It begins with His presence, and is celebrated in what His presence has created – the flowering of thousands of human beings who through His inspiration are learning to give joyous and creative expression to His vision in every moment of their daily lives.
When I recall those balmy tropical morning talks in Poona, India, I remember on many occasions my wonder that a presence as captivating as Bhagwan’s could utter words like “I am not. And I am not doing anything at all…” and absolutely mean it! His nondoing is tangible. “But something is happening, something tremendously is happening – that is another matter, it has nothing to do with my doing it.”
What gives these discourses their exhilarating power to move us is the magnitude of His being. In the insights, the reflections, the anecdotes, the lyrical odes to existence, the jokes and the ever-present wisdom of the mystic, in His simple releasing of His own divine fragrance, the mind is overwhelmed and the heart set dancing into being.
It is through His words that He has brought us into communion with the real nature of being. First He showed us His own presence: “I am only a hollow bamboo, and if you hear some music then it must be from God, it is not from me; it has nothing to do with me.” And then He gave us the key we needed to open up the prisons of our own personalities and step into our own being-ness.
To read His words is to discover those keys.
To use them is to embrace one’s own divinity.
This is what He means, for all of us!” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Wake Up the Slave’, on the first morning 27.02.1979.
“Life is a wandering, it is not a home. It is a search for the home, but it itself is not the home. It is an inquiry, an adventure. It is not necessarily that you will succeed – success is very rare – because the search is very complex and there are thousand and one difficulties on the way.
But let this be your first understanding about today’s sutras; they are of immense value. When you will meditate and when you will go deeper into them you will be surprised – oceans contained in dewdrops, just like that are the sutras.
Mohammed says: “I am like a rider who shelters under a tree, then goes on his way.”
Yes, this life is an overnight’s stay, a caravanserai. Don’t settle in it. Use the opportunity to reach higher and higher and higher, because there is no end to heights, to depths. But remember always: don’t take life for granted, it is only an opportunity with immense potential and possibilities. But if you start thinking that you have already arrived because you are alive, you will miss the whole point.
Jesus says again: “The world is to be treated as a bridge, not as a stopping-place.” Use it as a bridge; it can bridge you to God. And when life becomes a bridge to God, it is divine. But if you don’t use it as a bridge towards God it remains mundane, spurious, illusory, imaginary, fictitious.” (p. 3)

The last discourse in the series, ‘We are Ancient Pilgrims’, on 07.03.1979, (last three discourses on 08-10.03.1979 are with Questions and Answers), finishes with the words:
“Meditate on Atisha, listen to his advice, it is of immense value. It is not a philosophy, it is a manual to discipline yourself, it is a manual of inner transformation. It is the book that can help you grow into wisdom. I call it “The Book of Wisdom”. (p. 292)

* The Fish in the Sea is not Thirsty. 15 Discourses Given by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh on the Songs of Kabir. Editor and Compiler: Ma Yoga Anurag. Introduction: Sw Devageet. Design: Sw Govinddas. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Ma Prem Champa. Printing: Vakil and Sons Ltd. Bombay 400 038. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, July 1980. First Edition. 512 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 955 g. ISBN 0-88050-062-X (label). 5000 copies. Period: 11.04am – 25.04am 1979. 15 discourses. Subject: Kabir. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Darshan Diaries. Books on Bhagwan. Foreign Editions. Translations. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
In colophon: “We gratefully acknowledge the use of poems from THE KABIR BOOK by Robert Bly, Beacon Press, 1977, Boston, Mass. U.S.A.”
On back flap: “Bhagwan’s immense attempt, as I understand, is to find a new synthesis – political, cultural, religious and creative – between Western thought and the Eastern approach to life… a daily search for harmony and the joy of living…
This ashram… a small town where people live in the realisation of a new way of life, for man’s celebration of the joy of existence…
This forty-nine-year-old man reveals great intelligence and goodness. He is natural and direct. He is beautiful and spectacular…
Very few beings have been able to avoid falling into the trap of identification. Very few beings in the world have accepted the journey of Bhagwan: to connect ourselves with the totality of the universe and to live in the unique and real present.” Brescia Oggi. January, 1980. Italy.
“He is rightly one of the most fascinating and versatile masters from India. In his ideas we find a link with humanistic philosophy. In his words all great teachings and religions of the world are reflected.” Prana. Spring, 1978. Holland.

Introduction by Sw Devageet. Excerpts:
“Kabir was a rare man – he allowed the clear light of reality to shine undistorted through his being. He had no viewpoint. Existence found no conditions in him to block its flow. The song of eternity found, in him, a unique voice. He sang love poems to life, of such inner clarity that his words untangle the apparent paradoxes we encounter in any search for meaning. His gift allows us to share the song of his soul.
Today, sitting by the simple marble tomb of Sw Devateertha Bharti, father of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, the song of the sages is all around…
At this moment, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is singing ecstatically, wonderfully, with his whole being. In our time, blackened by the possibility of global destruction, this troubadour from the beyond sings the song of the heart in its utter purity. A fully enlightened Master is beaming light into the gloomy fastness of our ego. He stands at the door to the eternal, beckoning, with eyes so full of loving compassion, the heart becomes drunk with the promise they show to be possible.
It is rare enough for a human being to become enlightened – that is, to surrender his conditioned notions of identity into the reality of now. It is rarer still for an enlightened being to be a Master – that is, to be able to help you and me share his freedom. Today, here in Poona, such a man, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, is alive, wonderfully, amazingly alive.
The fish in the sea is not thirsty but you, knowingly or not, most surely are. Come and share, while it is available……Love. Sw Devageet. May 25, 1980”. (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘But Man Is’, on the first morning 11.04.1979.
“The fish in the sea is not thirsty – but man is. God is the sea – God surrounds you within and without. Man lives in God and is absolutely unaware of it. Man is born in God, breathes in God, and one day will dissolve in God. Man is God, made of the stuff called God, and yet completely oblivious of the fact.
The fish is not thirsty in the sea, but man is. God is the sea – God surrounds you, within and without. All that is is divine. God is not a person: God is the presence that is overflowing everywhere in all directions. The radiance, the beauty of existence, the splendour, the majestic, the miraculous, the mysterious – the whole magic of life is God.
God has not to be worshipped: God has to be lived. And to live God you need not go anywhere – you are already in him. To live God you need not cultivate any character. God is already the case. He is your consciousness.
To live God you need not become a Hindu or a Mohammedan or a Christian – you are already in it, he is already in you. It is not a question of the future. This very moment God is showering on you. But you are closed. He comes, but you don’t listen to him. He knocks on your doors, but you don’t listen to him. And he has been knocking for ages.
The old biblical story is: when Adam disobeyed God, he was frightened, obviously. God came in search of him. Afraid, he went behind a bush just to hide from God. He was not courageous enough to face him, to encounter him. And the story says God called in the garden of Eden, “Adam, where are you?”
Adam heard it, yet did not respond.
This is not just a story, this is not something that happened in the past: this is what is happening with each of you. God calls you – either you don’t hear, or, even if sometimes you hear, you don’t respond. You are hiding! You are hiding from yourself. You don’t want to see your original face: God is your original face. And unless you see your original face, you will live in misery.” (p. 1)

The last discourse in the series, ‘Very Few Find the Path’, on 23.04.1979, (last two discourses on 24-25.04.1979 are with Questions and Answers), finishes with the words:
“Very few people there are who have found the secret path. Out of a hundred, ninety remain indulgent in the animal; they never move beyond the animal. Out of the remaining ten, nine become repressive and pathological. Only one out of a hundred finds the true way. What is the true way?
The true way is that of understanding your mind, not of dropping it. The true way is: sitting silently and watching your mind – all its cunning ways, subtle ways, alt its strategies – just watch, just be a witness to your mind. And, slowly, slowly, by witnessing it you will understand what games it has been playing with you. You stop it from one door, it comes from another door; you stop it from that door, it makes a third door – and it goes on and on, ad nauseam.
Watch… Don’t renounce the world, and don’t try to drop the mind. Just become more alert. In that alertness, suddenly mind disappears, and with the mind disappears the whole world. And when there is no mind and no world, God is.” (p. 429)

* The Guest. Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh .Talks on Kabir Editor: Ma Yoga Sudha. Introduction: Ma Anand Parinita. Design: Ma Deva Yojana. Sw Anand Bhavo. Cover Design: Sw Govinddas. Sw Anand Neeraj. Photography: Sw Krishna Bhati. Phototypesetting: Spads Phototype Setting Industries (P) Ltd. Bombay. Printing: Electrographic Industries (D.B. Taraporevala Sons & Co. Pvt. Ltd.). Bombay. Binding: Rajneesh Foundation. Poona. Production: Ma Ananda Parinita. Ma Anand Premda. Ma Prem Prageeta. Sw Anand Hartmut. Sw Prem Sudharmo. Sw Samantbhadra. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Dipika. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi, Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, July 1981. First Edition. 580 pages. Illustrated. Unbound. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 935 g. No ISBN. 5000 copies. Period: 26.04am – 10.05am 1979. 15 discourses. Subject: Kabir. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall, Poona.

In Appendix: Major Book Distributors and Suppliers. Rajneesh Meditation Centres. Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Darshan Diaries. Books on Bhagwan. Books by Other Publishers. Books on Bhagwan. Editions in English. Translations.
With plain white cover without design and jacket.
In colophon: “The sutras in this book are from ‘The Kabir Book’, Beacon Press, Boston 1977 copyright Robert Bly.”

Introduction by Ma Anand Parinita:
“Listen, my friend / Inside me, inside you / There is a space / An empty longing / We are waiting for the Guest. / Kabir is a host. / For him, the Guest arrived long ago / And now he sings of the joy of their meeting. // Inside this book / There is a space / A vacuum of love / A soft billowing journey into the heart. // Bhagwan is a host / A sky opening endless into eternity, / And here, with him / The opportunity to merge with the Guest. // How can we miss? //This man is an invitation / A sonnet of joy / Of bliss / Of infinite waiting / Of God. // The journey is through love, with love, in love. // And He says, / “Yes, I am tremendously happy. / The moment I look at you my heart dances with joy… / And this is only the beginning.”

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘A Meeting With the Guest’, on the first morning 26.04.1979.

“Man is not what he is; man has become what he is not; that’s the root cause of his misery. He has gone astray from his being, he has become too involved in becoming.
To become means to become false. To become means to become that which you are not. To be is already the case. Man has not to become anything other than he is, he has to relax into his being and know the truth.
The truth is already given, the truth is not somewhere in the future. It is not a goal but the source. You are coming from truth. If you can find the source again you will know what truth is. You are not going towards truth; all going takes you farther and farther away from truth.
You must have heard the name of Radha. Mythologically she is known to be the most beloved woman of Krishna. He had many lovers; Radha was the suprememost. But historically there has never been any woman by the name of Radha, and in the ancient scriptures her name is not mentioned at all. It is an invention of later mystics, later sages, and it has tremendous significance; it will be good to understand it.
In Sanskrit there is a word, dhara, which means the river moving from the source towards the ocean. If you reverse the word dhara it becomes radha. Radha means the river moving towards the origin, not towards the ocean; radha is a metaphor. And one can be a beloved of God only if one turns the whole process of life – from being a dhara one becomes a radha, not moving towards the goal but going deeper and deeper down towards the source.
And the source is within you! The goal is without, the source, within. The source is your very being.” (p. 2)

The last discourse in the series, ‘The Guest is Inside You’, on 08.05.1979, (last two discourses on 09-10.05.1979 are with Questions and Answers), finishes with the words:
“Once you have looked in, the outer and the inner are no more separate; you become a witness of both. You see the outer, you see the inner; you are neither and you are both.
These statements are known as ulatbasi – as if someone is playing on the flute from the wrong end, so illogical, so irrational…. But Kabir says, “What can I do? It is so. I can only state the fact. If the fact is absurd, it is absurd.”
Kabir will perfectly agree with the Christian mystic, Tertullian.
Somebody asked him, “Why do you believe in God?” And Tertullian said, “I believe in God because God is absurd – credo qua absurdum.”
Kabir would have danced listening to this. Yes, God is not a logical hypothesis, it is supra-logical. No reasoning can prove it or disprove it. You will have to learn the art of love.
Be a lover, and you will find the Guest. Be a singer, and you will find the Guest. Be a dancer, and you will find the Guest. Turn in, tune in – He is waiting there for you.” (p. 481)

* The Book of the Books. Discourses on The Dhammapada of Gautam the Buddha. Volume 1 of 4. Introduction: Sw Anand Veetmoha. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International, Antelope, Oregon, July 1982. First Edition. 343 pages. No illustrations. Quality paperback. Size: 21,5×14 cm. Weight: 460 g. ISBN 0-99050-513-3. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 82-50462. 5000 copies. $15.95. Period: 21.06am – 30.06am 1979. 10 discourses. Subject: Buddha. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix on yellow pages: Books Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. The Discourses of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Intimate Dialogues between the Master and His disciples. Books from other Publishers. Editions in English. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centres, Ashrams and Communes.
No mentioning of the crew behind this production.
In colophon: “Extracts from ‘The Dhammapada: The Sayings of the Buddha’, translated by Thomas Byron, are reprinted with kind permission of the publishers, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, and Wildwood House Ltd., London. Text copyright 1976 Thomas Byron.”
On back cover: “Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh offers what the Masters before him offered. The potent difference is that he is alive, so rather than a dependence on commandment, dogma, or method, we are able to have a personal experience, a communion, a love interconnection, and in so doing, directly touch the transcendent space within.” Robert M. Birnbaum, Ph.D. Journal of Humanistic Psychology. Winter, 1982. U.S.A.
“What he says is couched in language of great power and fluency; he is one of the most remarkable orators I have ever heard, though there is no hint of demagogy in his style, and no oratory or pedagogic feeling about the content of what he says.” Bernard Levin. The Times. April 9, 1980. United Kingdom.
The Dhammapada was later published in an enlarged edition, a 12-volume boxed set (1991).

Introduction by Sw Anand Veetmoha:
“In the years before He entered silence in May 1981, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh spoke on hundreds of Masters and their teachings. But from the start there was something unique about The Book of the Books – the series on “The Dhammapada” of Gautam Buddha.
I was never particularly drawn to the rather dry and intellectual scriptures of Buddha, but I had always understood that “The Dhammapada” was “it”: the essence of Buddha’s teachings, no extras, no commentary, the spiritual guidebook par excellence, from the lips of one whom everyone agrees was a very, very special human being – in short, all you need to understand and become a Buddha yourself.
In December 1978 we heard that Bhagwan was going to speak on “The Dhammapada” – six series of discourses continuing for almost a year. I was awestruck. I had a profound sense of déjà vu, of history repeating itself, of the turning of the wheel of dhamma. This was Buddha on Buddha. For I had no doubt that in some sense Bhagwan Himself had spoken these words and was back twenty-five centuries later to scrape off the tarnish, polish them up a bit, update them here and there, and generally give us a new edition for a new age and put His signature on the title page.
But we were in for a shock.
June 11 1979 arrived, and the ashram was packed for the first day of the English series in the cool monsoon month of June. But there was no 8 a.m. crunch of gravel on the driveway to Buddha Hall announcing Bhagwan’s arrival to a hushed audience of three thousand. Bhagwan’s health was poor.
It was a long absence – the longest for five years. Bhagwan had spoken daily since June 1974 with only a day or two’s absence here and there. A number of times He had told us that one day He would stop speaking and sit with us in silence. Was this it? Would we never hear His voice again? Would He never even start “The Dhammapada”? Had He already spun the wheel of dhamma? – and we had all missed it.
Ten days we waited. It was a time of soul-searching, of looking inside at the nature of our love for our Master.
Then, on June 21, He came out to us, pale and frail. It was a stunning discourse. Read it. It forms the first chapter of this book. He told us that for ten days the future of our relationship with Him hung in the balance, that we may never have heard His voice again. As it happened, we had two more years to accept Bhagwan’s repeated invitation to come and listen and to prepare ourselves for the silence which could come at any moment. We were to continue to hear Him until May 1981, when He entered the ultimate phase of His work with us, of silent communion. I, for one, was happy for the reprieve, for I loved His words dearly.
As “The Dhammapada” series continued, there was a deepening sense of a circle completed, of the paying of a debt to Buddha, and finally, of the beginning of a new circle, of the burning of old scriptures and the birth of a new dispensation – the living word of Bhagwan.
How incredible that we have Bhagwan to put even Buddha in perspective, to bridge the centuries of Buddhist mumbo-jumbo and show us the real Buddha – lovingly, compassionately, to knock Buddha off his pedestal!” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘We are What We Think’, on the first morning 21.06.1979.
“My beloved bodhisattvas…. yes that’s how I look at you. That’s how you have to start looking at yourselves. ‘Bodhisattva’ means a Buddha in essence, a Buddha in seed, a Buddha asleep, but with all the potential to be awake. In that sense everybody is a bodhisattva, but not everybody can be called a bodhisattva – only those who have started groping for the light, who have started longing for the dawn, in those hearts the seed is no more a seed but has become a sprout, has started growing.
You are bodhisattvas because of your longing to be conscious, to be alert, because of your quest for the truth. The truth is not far away, but there are very few fortunate ones in the world who long for it. It is not far away but it is arduous, it is hard to achieve. It is hard to achieve, not because of its nature, but because of our investment in lies.
We have invested for lives and lives in lies. Our investment is so much that the very idea of truth makes us frightened. We want to avoid it, we want to escape from the truth. Lies are beautiful escapes – convenient, comfortable dreams. But dreams are dreams. They can enchant you for the moment, they can enslave you for the moment, but only for the moment. And each dream is followed by tremendous frustration, and each desire is followed by deep failure…
I have waited long… now the time is ripe, you are ready. The seeds can be sown. These tremendously important words can be uttered again. For twenty-five centuries, such a gathering has not existed at all. Yes, there have been a few enlightened Masters with a few disciples – half a dozen, a dozen at the most – and in small gatherings the Dhammapada has been taught. But those small gatherings cannot transform such a huge humanity. It is like throwing sugar in the ocean with spoons: it cannot make it sweet – your sugar is simply wasted…
I am immensely glad, because after these ten days of silence I can say to you that many of you are now ready to commune with me in silence. That is the ultimate in communication. Words are inadequate, words say but only partially. Silence communes totally.
And to use words is a dangerous game too, because my meaning will remain with me, only the word will reach you; and you will give it your own meaning, your own colour. It will not contain the same truth that it was meant to contain. It will contain something else, something far poorer. It will contain your meaning, not my meaning. You can distort language – in fact it is almost impossible to avoid distortion – but you cannot distort silence. Either you understand or you don’t understand.
And for these ten days there were only two categories of people here: those who understood and those who did not. But there was not a single person who misunderstood. You cannot misunderstand silence – that’s the beauty of silence. The demarcation is absolute: either you understand or, simply, you don’t understand – there is nothing to misunderstand.
With words the case is just the opposite: it is very difficult to understand, it is very difficult to understand that you don’t understand… these two are almost impossibilities. And the third is the only possibility: misunderstanding.
These ten days have been of strange beauty, and of a mysterious majesty too. I no longer really belong to this shore. My ship has been waiting for me for a long time – I should have gone. It is a miracle that I am still in the body. The whole credit goes to you: to your love, to your prayers, to your longing. You would like me to linger a little while longer on this shore, hence the impossible has become possible.
These ten days, I was not feeling together with my body. I was feeling very uprooted, dislocated. It is strange to be in the body when you don’t feel that you are in the body. And it is also strange to go on living in a place which no more belongs to you – my home is on the other shore. And the call comes persistently. But because you need me, it is the compassion of the universe – you call it God’s compassion – that is allowing me to be in the body a little more.
It was strange, it was beautiful, it was mysterious, it was majestic, it was magical. And many of you have felt it. Many of you have felt it in different ways. A few have felt it as a very frightening phenomenon, as if death is knocking on the door. A few have felt it as a great confusion. A few have felt shocked, utterly shocked. But everybody has been touched in some way or other.
Only the newcomers were a little at a loss – they could not comprehend what was going on. But I feel thankful to them too. Although they could not understand what was going on, they waited – they were waiting for me to speak, they were waiting for me to say something, they were hoping. Many were afraid that I might not speak ever again… that was also a possibility. I was not certain myself.
Words are becoming more and more difficult for me. They are becoming more and more of an effort. I have to say something so I go on saying something to you. But I would like you to get ready as soon as possible so that we can simply sit in silence… listening to the birds and their songs… or listening just to our own heartbeat… just being there, doing nothing…
Get ready as soon as possible, because I may stop speaking any day. And let the news be spread to all nooks and corners of the world: those who want to understand me only through the words, they should come soon, because I may stop speaking any day. Unpredictably, any day, it may happen – it may happen even in the middle of a sentence. Then I am not going to complete the sentence! Then it will hang forever and forever… incomplete.
But this time you have pulled me back.
These sayings of Buddha are called ‘Dhammapada’. This name has to be understood. ‘Dhamma’ means many things. It means the ultimate law, logos. By ‘ultimate law’ is meant that which keeps the whole universe together. Invisible it is, intangible it is – but it is certainly! Otherwise the universe would fall apart. Such a vast, infinite universe, running so smoothly, so harmoniously, is enough proof that there must be an undercurrent that connects everything, that joins everything, that bridges everything – that we are not islands, that the smallest grass leaf is joined to the greatest star. Destroy a small grass leaf and you have destroyed something of immense value to the existence itself.” (pp. 4-10)

The last discourse in the series, ‘The Beginning Of A New Phase’, on 29.06.1979, (the last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 30.06.1979), finishes with the words:
“And when the mind is no more, where do you go? Suddenly, when the mind is no more, you enter into the heart. You slip out of the mind, out of the grip of the head. And then the heart, the cave of the heart, is your palace. The mind is a by-product of the society: the heart is an extension of God.
This is possible only if you work single-mindedly to still the mind, to be aware of the mind, to be utterly watchful, without any judgement and without any identification.
The master quells his thoughts.
He ends their wandering.
Seated in the cave of the heart,
He finds freedom.
The head is a slavery, the heart the freedom. The head is a misery, the heart the ultimate bliss. Ais dhammo sanantano.” (p. 300)

* The Book of the Books. Discourses on The Dhammapada of Gautam the Buddha. Volume 2 of 4. Editor: Ma Prem Asha. Introduction: Sw Krishna Prem. Design: Ma Prem Tushita. Direction: Ma Yoga Pratima. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela, Rajneesh Foundation International, Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, December 1983. Printed in U.S.A. First Edition. 344 pages. Paperback. Size: 18×11 cm. Weight: 250 g. ISBN 0-88050-514-1. Library of Congress Catalog Number 82-50462. 10.000 copies. $4.95. Period: 01.07am. – 10.07am 1979. 10 discourses. Subject: Buddha. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. Discourses. Initiation Talks. Other Titles (Including: Rajneeshism, an introduction to Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and His religion. Sound of Running Water. The Orange Book, the meditation techniques of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh). Books from other Publishers. Editions in English. Books on Bhagwan (Including: The Awakened One: The Life and Work of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh by Sw Satya Vedant (Harper & Row). Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centres, Ashrams and Communes.
In colophon: “Extracts from ‘The Dhammapada: The Sayings of the Buddha’, translated by Thomas Byron, are reprinted with kind permission of the publishers, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, and Wildwood House Ltd., London. Text copyright 1976 Thomas Byron.”
On back cover: “…Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is an especially outstanding personality in cultural and spiritual realms of the present time. I even dare say that He is the most important living exponent of a process of harmonization of East and West, of spirituality and intellect who will be mentioned in the history of mankind, having already during His lifetime realized a humanistic and religious synthesis of historical significance.” Fritz Tanner, Ph.D. Marriage Counsellor, Psychological Practitioner. Zürich, Switzerland.

Introduction by Sw Krishna Prem. Excerpt:
What I am saying here,” He said one morning, “you can read in the Bhagavad Gita, in the Bible, in the Koran, in the Dhammapada, what I am saying you can find easily in the Upanishads, in he Tao Te Ching – but you will not find the fragrance. Those are flowers – old, dead, dried up. You can keep a roseflower in your Bible; soon it will be dry, the fragrance will be gone, it will be only a corpse, a remembrance of the real flower. So are the scriptures. They have to be made alive again by another Buddha, otherwise they cannot breathe.
“That’s why I am speaking on the Dhammapada, on the Gita, on the Bible – to let them breathe again. I can breathe life into them. I can share my fragrance with them, I can pour my fragrance into them. Hence, the Christian who is really a Christian, not just by social conditioning but because of a great love for Christ, he will find Christ alive in my words again. Or if somebody is a Buddhist he will find in my words Buddha speaking again – in twentieth-century language, with twentieth-century people…
“And then all the scriptures become alive for you. Then reading the Bible, you are not just reading a book – then Moses speaks to you, Abraham speaks to you, Jesus speaks to you, face to face!”
Here, then, is the rich and incomparable fragrance of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, breathing new life and love and laughter into words twenty-five centuries old.
And here, too, is Gautam the Buddha. Speaking to you. Face to face!” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘The Wisdom of Innocence’, on the first morning 1.07.1979.
“Once I was asked: “What is philosophy?” I said, “Philosophy is the art of asking the wrong questions.” The blind man asking, “What is light?” – this is philosophy. The deaf asking “What is music? What is sound?” – this is philosophy.
If the blind man asks, “How can I get my eyes back?” this is no more philosophy, this is religion. If the deaf goes to the physician to be treated so that he can hear, then he is moving in the direction of religion and not in the direction of philosophy…
Philosophy is guesswork, it is speculation; knowing nothing, one tries to invent the truth. And the truth cannot be invented, and anything invented cannot be true. The truth has to be discovered. It is already there… all that we need is to open eyes – eyes to see it, a heart to feel it, a being to be present to it. The truth is always present but we are absent, and because we are absent we cannot see the truth. And we go on asking about the truth, and we don’t ask the right question: How to be present? How to become a presence?…
Religion simply means creating a space in your mind which is capable of being one without any split, which is capable of integrity, clarity, perceptiveness. A mind which is full of thoughts cannot perceive; those thoughts go on interfering. Those thoughts are there, layer upon layer. By the time something reaches your innermost core, if it ever reaches, it is no more the same as it was delivered by someone who had known. It is a totally different phenomenon.” (p. 4)

The last discourse in the series, ‘Sowing Seeds Of Bliss’, on 09.07.1979, (the last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 10.07.1979), finishes with the words:
“Meditation is freedom. Awareness is freedom. And those who live mechanically, unconsciously, unintelligently, they live in prison. And to live in prison is to suffer.
Freedom is the ultimate value of life.
… follow the awakened
And set yourself free.
Ais dhammo sanantano….”
(p. 285)

* The Book of the Books. Discourses on The Dhammapada of Gautam the Buddha. Volume 3 of 4. Editor: Ma Prem Karima. Introduction: Sw Veet Santap. Design: Ma Prem Pujan. Direction: Ma Yoga Pratima. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International, Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, December 1984. Printed in U.S.A. First edition. 344 pages. Paperback. Size: 18×11 cm. Weight: 245 g. ISBN 0-88050-515. Library of Congress Catalog Number 82-50462. 10.000 copies. $4.95. Period: 11.08am & 13.08am. – 21.08am 1979. 10 discourses. Subject: Buddha. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. Academy of Rajneeshism Titles (Including Rajneeshism and The Book,
an introduction to the teachings of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh). Discourses. Initiation Talks. Photobiographies (Including Sound of Running Water and This Very Place The Lotus Paradise, a photobiography of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and His Work, 1978-1984). Responses to Questions: Be Still and Know. The Goose is Out. My Way: The Way of the White Clouds. Walking in Zen, Sitting in Zen. Walk Without Feet, Fly Without Wings and Think Without Mind. Zen: Zest, Zip, Zap and Zing. Books from other Publishers. English Editions. Foreign Language Editions (Including in Italian: Rajneeshismo, una introduzione a Bhagwan Shagwan Shree Rajneesh a sua religione. Also in Japanese). Rajneesh Meditation Centres, Ashrams and Communes.
In colophon: “The sutras used in this book are from The Dhammapada: The Sayings of the Buddha, translated by Thomas Byron. Text copyright 1976 Thomas Byron.”
List of Contents is with chapter headings followed by a few lines indicating the topic of the discourse.
From back cover: “In this modern day the very existence of such a religious teacher as Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh proves to be invaluable not only for the future of established religions but more importantly for the well being of all mankind.
“Personally I feel Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh points the direction in which to look in probing the reason for life, why we are here, alive on this planet.” Shinichi Yoshifuka. President C & F Communications Inc., Tokyo.

Introduction by Sw Veet Santap. Excerpt:
“‘Find friends who love the truth’. In the opening sutra of this third volume of THE BOOK OF THE BOOKS, these words of Gautam Buddha appear: Find friends who love the truth. Truth is what this book is all about. It is, through Buddha’ Dhammapada, the living enlightened Master Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh sharing the truth He has experienced, the truth He is – sharing it with His sannyasins, with those who have gathered around Him, with a company of friends who love the truth.
And Bhagwan’s invitation to truth, extended over and over again in these pages, is that friends who love the truth, seek the truth, are already buddhas – sleeping perhaps, but buddhas nonetheless, And His message is clear. “My teaching,” He says on the book’s closing page, “is for self-awareness, self-transformation. I would like you to become as vast as the sky – because that’s what really you are.”
With this volume of THE BOOK OF THE BOOKS, join the company of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and Gautam Buddha. Join the company of friends who love the truth.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Knowledge Is Not Knowledge’, on the first morning 11.08.1979.
“Knowledge is not knowledge. It has the appearance of knowledge, hence it deceives many. Knowledge is only information. It does not transform you, you remain the same. Your accumulation of information goes on growing. Rather than liberating you, it burdens you, it goes on creating new bondages for you.
The so-called man of knowledge is far more foolish than the so-called fool, because the fool at least is innocent. He is ignorant, but he has no pretensions of knowing – that much truth is his. But the man of knowledge, is in a far more mess: he knows nothing but he thinks he knows. Without knowing, to believe that one knows is to remain forever rooted in ignorance.
Knowledge is a way of ignorance to protect itself – and it protects itself very cunningly, very efficiently, very cleverly. Knowledge is the enemy although it appears as the friend.
This is the first step towards wisdom: to know that you don’t know, to know that all knowledge is borrowed, to know that it has not happened to you, it has come from others, that it is not your own insight, your own realization. The moment knowledge is your own realization, it is wisdom.
Wisdom means that you are not a parrot, that you are a man, that you are not repeating others but expressing yourself, that you are not a carbon copy, that you have an original face of your own.” (p. 3)

The last discourse in the series, ‘A Small Candle’, on 20.08.1979, (last discourse on 21.08.1979 is with Questions and Answers), finishes with the words:
“By revering a Buddha, by respecting a Buddha, by trusting a Buddha, you are conquering life itself. And you will attain to beauty, strength and happiness. In that surrender you will become beautiful, because the ego is gone and the ego is ugly. And you will become strong, because the ego is gone – the ego is always weak and impotent. And you will become happy for the first time, because for the first time you have seen a glimpse of truth, for the first time you have seen a glimpse of your own being. The Buddha is a mirror: when you bow down you see your original face reflected in the Buddha.
Let your heart be full of the prayer: Buddham sharanam gachchhami, sangham sharanam gachchhami, dhammam sharanam gachchhami.” (p. 280)

* The Book of the Books. Discourses on The Dhammapada of Gautam the Buddha. Volume 4 of 4. Editor: Sw Krishna Prabhu. Introduction: Sw Anand Sugeet. Design: Ma Prem Bhava. Direction: Ma Yoga Pratima. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International, Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, July 1985. Printed in U.S.A. First Edition. 376 pages. Paperback. Size: 18×11 cm. Weight: 270 g. ISBN 0-88050-516-8. Library of Congress Catalog Number 82-50462. 10.000 copies. $4.95. Period: 22.08am – 31.08am 1979. 10 discourses. Subject: Buddha. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. Academy of Rajneeshism Titles (Including The Rajneesh Bible. Volume 1-3). Discourses. Initiation Talks. Photobiographies. Books from other Publishers. English Editions. Foreign Language Editions (Including: Rajneeshismus – Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh und seine Religion. (Eine Einführung. Rajneesh Foundation International. USA). Overseas Distributors. Rajneesh Meditation Centres, Ashrams and Communes.
In colophon: “The sutras used in this book are from The Dhammapada: The Sayings of the Buddha, translated by Thomas Byron. Text copyright 1976 Thomas Byron.”

Introduction by Sw Krishna Prem. Excerpt:
“Don’t expect a scholarly dissertation. And don’t expect this volume to be limited to the sutras. Bhagwan doesn’t offer an erudite commentary for the edification of great intellectuals, nor does He aim to please the modern pundits of religion. Instead, Bhagwan uses Buddha as a launching pad for a journey into the farthest reaches of ourselves. It is the only journey ultimately worth taking.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Better than a Hundred Years’, on the first morning 22.08.1979.
“Gautam the Buddha has raised the most important question for all those who are capable of enquiring into truth, into life, into existence. The most important question of all questions is: What is true happiness? And is there a possibility to achieve it? Is true happiness possible at all, or is all momentary? Is life only a dream, or is there something substantial in it too? Does life begin with birth and end with death, or is there something that transcends birth and death? – because without the eternal there is no possibility of true happiness. With the momentary, happiness will remain fleeting: one moment it is there, the other moment gone, and you are left in great despair and darkness.” (p. 3)

The last discourse in the series, ‘Awake to the Law’, on 30.08.1979, (last discourse on 31.08.1979 is with Questions and Answers), finishes with the words:
“Become aware, trust, start seeing – drop all beliefs and all doubts, and the goal is not far away. You need not go anywhere. If you can trust, meditate, see, if you can awake to the eternal law, you are the master – not master of anybody else but master of yourself. And that is true mastery; Jesus calls it the kingdom of God.
But you will have to be reborn, you will have to learn a new way of life – a new way, let me remind you, not a new philosophy. And Buddha is giving you hints. These hints can be used if you listen attentively, intelligently, meditatively.” (p. 316)

* Be Still and Know. Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Answering Disciples’ Questions. On front cover: ‘Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Responding to Disciples’ and Visitors’ Questions’. Editor: Ma Yoga Anurag. Compilation: Ma Ananda Vandana. Ma Deva Bhadra. Introduction: Ma Anand Nirala. Design: Sw Anand Subhadra. Jacket Design: Sw Govinddas. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Typesetting: Graphic Systems Poona. Printing: New Thaker’s Fine Press Pvt. Ltd. Bombay. Binding: Rajneesh Foundation and New Thacker’s Fine Art Press Pvt. Ltd. Production: Ma Viran. Ma Anand Nirala. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi, Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, March 1981. First Edition. 369 pages. Illustrated with hand drawings and colour photos. Unbound. Size: 22×14 cm. Weight: 485 g. No ISBN. 1.000 Hardback copies. 4.000 Paperback copies. Period: 01.09am – 10.09am 1979. 10 discourses. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Publications From Rajneesh Foundation. Discourses. Responses to Questions (My Way: The Way of the White Clouds (deluxe edition with colour photographs). Walk Without Feet, Fly Without Wings and Think Without Mind. Be Still and Know. Zen: Zest, Zip, Zap and Zing). Darshan Diaries. Books by Other Publishers. Books on Bhagwan. Editions in English. Translations. (In Danish: Hemmelighedernes Bog 1. Borgens Forlag, Denmark). Major Book Distributors and Suppliers. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
Quotations from Osho on both flaps.
Foreword on Sw Devateertha Bharti’s, Osho’s father born in Timarni in 1908, death celebration on 08.09.1979. now Mahaparinirvana Day. “For a fuller account of Dadaji’s life and death and for translations of what Bhagwan said in Hindi about him, see the darshan diary entitled ‘Don’t Let Yourself Be Upset by the Sutra, Rather Upset the Sutra Yourself’ – chapters nine, ten and eleven – and Sannyas magazine number 6, 1979.”
From page 275 to 279 a colour insert on 31 pages of Dadaji’s celebration is included in this volume.

Introduction by Ma Anand Nirala. Excerpt:
“‘Be still and know! / You are here, not to learn more words; / You are here to get deeper into silence. / Use my words as hints towards a wordless existence.’ // He is here destroying our questions / Every day of this series; / Pulling them apart, / Exposing the answers hidden within. / For the penetrating sunlight He is, / Pierces the core of our egoistic minds, / Shrivelling our whats, whys and hows / To the nothings they are – / Bringing us to the ultimate of questions… / ‘Who am I?’ // To have been here for these lectures / has been a gift… / Away from all the faces I wear and the games I play. // Basking each day in Buddha Hall, / I can still ask the what, whys and hows of Him / And, for a moment, sit with the sun showering / or the lightning striking around me. / For a moment, feeling his love nurturing this bud of me / Feeling this, now. // Come, come dive into the emptiness of these waves of love / and swim in His orange ocean… // ‘Working with you / I am worshipping you. / Talking to you / I am loving you – / Not just giving you a doctrine / but my heart. / Handle it with care.'” (No page number)

In some of his answers Osho is commenting upon Dadaji’s death. Chapter 9, He Died In Samadhi. Excerpt:
“Vivek, It was not a death at all. Or it was the total death. And both mean the same thing. I was hoping that he would die in this way. He died a death that everybody should be ambitious for: he died in samadhi, he died utterly detached from the body and the mind.
I went to see him only three times during this whole month he was in the hospital. Whenever I felt that he was just on the verge, I went to see him. The first two times I was a little afraid that if he died he would have to be born again; a little attachment to the body was there. His meditation was deepening every day, but a few chains with the body were still intact, were not broken.
Yesterday I went to see him: I was immensely happy that now he could die a right death. He was no more concerned with the body. Yesterday, early in the morning at three o’clock, he attained his first glimpse of the eternal – and immediately he became aware that now he was going to die. This was the first time he had called me to come; the other two times I had gone on my own. Yesterday he called me to come because he was certain that he was going to die. He wanted to say goodbye, and he said it beautifully – with no tears in the eyes, with no longing for life any more.” (p. 280)

* The White Lotus. Discourses on Fragmentary Notes of Bodhidharma’s Disciples. Editor: Ma Prem Asha. Compilation: Ma Deva Bhadra. Sw Prem Prasad. Introduction: Ma Prem Asha. Design: Ma Prem Tushita. Sw Premdharma. Jacket Design: Sw Govinddas. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Phototypesetting: Spads Phototype Setting Industries (P) Ltd. Bombay. Processing: Rajneesh Foundation. Poona. Binding: Rajneesh Foundation. Poona. Printing: Electrographic Industries (D.B. Taraporevala Sons Co. Pvt. Ltd). Production: Ma Deva Weechee. Sw Das Anudas. Ma Anand Parinita. Ma Deva Magno. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, March 1981. First Edition. 413 pages. Illustrated with blue tinted photographs, drawings and lotus vignettes. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 830 g. ISBN 0-88050-172-3 (label). 1.000 hardbound copies. 4.000 paperback copies. Period: 31.10am – 10.11am 1979. 11 discourses. Subject: Buddhist Masters. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Publications From Rajneesh Foundation. Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Darshan Diaries. Miscellaneous (Including: A Cup of Tea, Letters to Disciples. The Rajneesh Nothing Book, 200 blank pages to play with. The Song Book: Drinking From Your Wine, Bhagwan, Songs from the Ashram music group. The Orange Book, The Meditation Techniques of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh). Books on Bhagwan. Books by Other Publishers. Books on Bhagwan. Editions in English. Translations. Major Book Distributors and Suppliers. Rajneesh Meditation Centres.
In colophon: “The sutras quoted in this book are from ‘BUDDHISM AND ZEN’, compiled, edited and translated by Nyogen Senzaki and Ruth Stroud McCandless, Philosophical Library, New York, 1953.”
From back jacket: “…Just by reading these discourses there is a risk you may be pulverized by their inspiration.” Le Temps de Lire. January 1981. France.
On both flaps quotations by Osho.

Introduction by Ma Prem Asha:
“This is a book which burns my heart. Two Masters – both of whom I love – have finally met, and I am inexorably moved.
I have never met Bodhidharma – I have no memory of past lives nor any facility with astral travel either – yet stories of this impeccable ‘roaring lion of Zen’ ignite the same fierce joy and wild exuberance that overtake me with Bhagwan, my beloved Master.
What it is, why it should be so, I don’t know. This is an affair of the heart not of the head. And yet an integrity which roars and shakes, a love which floods and devastates meet in this man, the lion-lotus, as present silence – ‘vast emptiness’ – into which one is drawn and becomes for a moment a flickering in the eye of God.
‘I am like the dragon singing in the dry wood, whosoever hears it… disappears.'” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Lotus Rain’, on the first morning 31.10.1979.
“I am ecstatic because just the name of Bodhidharma is psychedelic to me. In the long evolution of human consciousness there has never been such an outlandish Budddha as Bodhidharma – very rare, very unique, exotic. Only in some small ways George Gurdjieff comes close to him, but not very close, and only in some ways, not in all ways.
There have been many Buddhas in the world, but Bodhidharma stands out like Everest. His way of being, living, and expressing the truth is simply his; it is incomparable. Even his own Master, Gautam the Buddha, cannot be compared with Bodhidharma. Even Buddha would have found it difficult to digest this man.
This man Bodhdharma travelled from India to China to spread the message of his Master. Although they are separated by one thousand years, for Bodhidharma and for men like them there is no time, no space – for Bodhidharma Buddha was as contemporary as Buddha is contemporary to me.” (p. 1)

The last discourse in the series, Truly Right, on 10.11.1979 finishes with the words:
“When there is no choice, no greed, not even for the right-mindfulness that is Buddha’s basic teaching: sammasati – right-mindfulness… Even for that, in the ultimate state of intelligence, there is no choice. Not even the desire to be a Buddha or to be a bodhisattva. No desire for nirvana, no desire for God – desire as such has disappeared. One lives moment to moment, without any desire. Tremendous is his richness.
There are people who have much but still desire more; their poverty is beyond belief. And there are people who don’t have much and still don’t desire anything more; their richness is beyond measure.
A man who has no desires has come home. He has become a chakravartin. He has conquered the world without conquering anything at all, because the whole kingdom of God is his, all inexhaustible treasures are his.
The only secret is choiceless awareness.
These answers of Bodhidharma can be reduced to this single phrase: choiceless awareness.
But don’t cling to the words, experience it, because it is only experience that liberates.” (p. 388)

1980 Talks in Buddha Hall

* Ah, This! Responses to Disciples’ and Visitors’ Questions and Zen Stories. Introduction: Sw Prem Pramod. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela, Rajneesh Foundation International, Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, December 1982. Printed in USA. First Edition. Illustrated with drawings. Quality Paperback. Size: 19×12,5 cm. Weight: 255 g. ISBN 0-88050-502-8. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 82-24026. 7.000 copies. $8.95. Period: 03.01am – 10.01am 1980. 8 discourses. Subject: Zen. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

No mentioning of editor or crew behind this production.
In Appendix on orange paper: Translations and Books on Bhagwan listed according to language. Rajneesh Meditation Centres, Ashrams and Communes.
“The Zen stories in this book are excerpted from: ‘ZEN AND JAPANESE CULTURE’, Bollingen Series LXIV, Copyright 1959, by Daisetz T. Suzuki, reprinted with the kind permission of the publishers, Princeton University Press, Princeton, N.J. and ‘CH’AN AND ZEN TEACHING’, Series One, edited, translated and explained by Lu K’uan Yu (Charles Luk), Hutchinson Publishing Group Ltd., London.”
On back cover and front flap quotations by Osho.
On back flap: “Rajneesh has combined wisdom from almost all Eastern religions, he has utilized thoughts and methods from some Western philosophies and psychological techniques.
“To many, the appeal of Rajneeshism is the freedom to be here now, to grow in freedom, to move away from guilt, to leave the traps of the ego… to fully celebrate life.” Connections. August 1982.

Introduction by Sw Prem Pramod:
“A raincloud shrouds the valley. / Night rains have filled the air with sage. / Past my window, a tumbleweed spins / and, in the stream, a gray heron stands, poised to / stike. / The morning sun rolls over dark hills. // On and on, whereever I look, beauty, wonder. / I could say, “This is God,” / or try to tell you about Zen / or the Zen master whose book this is. / My head could talk to your head. / But why? / The Master has said it all / better than I, / and now lives in silence, / occasionally murmuring, / “Ah, this!” // To all our questions: / What is enlightenment? / Who am I? / What is the meaning of life? / Does God exist? / What is reality? / He waves his hand and says, “This!” / What is “this?” YOU are. Look, smell, taste, listen, touch – all at once. Feel, laugh, jump, run, shout, breathe. Breathe it in, breathe it out. It’s all you. This, black letters on white paper changing into a word with a meaning in your brain, is you now. You, trying to grasp it, is this. Whatever is, right now, right here, for you is this. This is all there is.
Hence Zen Master Daie says, “All the teachings the sages expounded are no more than commentaries on your sudden cry: “Ah, this!”” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘The Heart Of Knowing Is Now’, on the first morning 03.01.1980.
“Zen is just Zen. There is nothing comparable to it. It is unique – unique in the sense that it is the most ordinary and yet the most extraordinary phenomenon that has happened to human consciousness. It is the most ordinary because it does not believe in knowledge, it does not believe in mind. It is not a philosophy, not a religion either. It is the acceptance of the ordinary existence with a total heart, with one’s total being, not desiring some other world, supra-mundane, supra-mental. It has no interest in any esoteric nonsense, no interest in metaphysics at all. It does not hanker for the other shore; this shore is more than enough. Its acceptance of this shore is so tremendous that through that very acceptance it transforms this shore – and this very shore becomes the other shore:
This very body the Buddha
This very earth the Lotus Paradise.
Hence it is ordinary. It does not want you to create a certain kind of spirituality, a certain kind of holiness. All that it asks is that you live your life with immediacy, spontaneity. And then the mundane becomes the sacred.
The great miracle of Zen is in the transformation of the mundane into the sacred. And it is tremendously extraordinary because this way life has never been approached before, this way life has never been respected before.
Zen goes beyond Buddha and beyond Lao Tzu. It is a culmination, a transcendence, both of the Indian genius and of the Chinese genius. The Indian genius reached its highest peak in Gautam the Buddha and the Chinese genius reached its highest peak in Lao Tzu. And the meeting… the essence of Buddha’s teaching and the essence of Lao Tzu’s teaching merged into one stream so deeply that no separation is possible now. Even to make a distinction between what belongs to Buddha and what to Lao Tzu is impossible, the merger has been so total. It is not only a synthesis, it is an integration. Out of this meeting Zen was born. Zen is neither Buddhist nor Taoist and yet both.
To call Zen “Zen Buddhism” is not right because it is far more. Buddha is not so earthly as Zen is. Lao Tzu is earthly, Buddha is unearthly, Zen is both – and in being both it has become the most extraordinary phenomenon.” (p. 1)

The last discourse in the series, ‘Take No Notice’, on 09.01.1980, (last discourse on 10.01.1980 is with Questions and Answers), finishes with the words:
“My effort is to use all the methods of the past, to make them up-to-date, to make them contemporary, and to create new methods for the future – for the future of humanity. Hence what I am teaching is neither Hinduism nor Buddhism nor Christianity, and yet I am teaching the essence of all the religions.
You are here not to cultivate a certain spiritual ego but to dissolve all the ego, to dissolve all sleep. You are here to wake up. The situation is being created – use this situation as totally as possible.
Remember this woman who was meditating on “Take no notice.” Such totality is needed. The house is on fire and she says: “Take no notice.” Her son falls into the water and she says: “Take no notice.” Her husband calls her mad and she says: “Take no notice.” Then such a simple meditation – of taking no notice – creates the necessary milieu in which she becomes aflame, afire. Her inner being explodes. She is no more the same old person; she is reborn. She is reborn as enlightened. She becomes a Buddha.
You are all Buddhas – sleeping, dreaming, but you are Buddhas all the same. My function is not to make Buddhas out of you, because you are already that, but just to help you remember it, to remind you.” (p. 209)

* Walking in Zen Sitting in Zen. Responses to Disciples’ and Visitors’ Questions and Zen Stories. Introduction: Sw Das Anudas. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International, Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, December 1982. Printed in USA. First Edition. 430 pages. No illustrations. Quality Paperback. Size: 19×12,5 cm. Weight: 430 g. ISBN 0-88050-668-7. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 82-24025. 7,000 copies. $10.95. Period: 05.03am – 10.03am 1980 and 01.05-10.05.1980. 16 discourses. Subject: Zen. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

No mentioning of editor and crew behind this production.
In Appendix on orange paper: Books Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. The Discourses of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Intimate Dialogues Between the Master and His Disciples. Books From Other Publishers. Translations and Books on Bhagwan listed according to language. Rajneesh Meditation Centres, Ashrams and Communes.
No credit in colophon to publisher for quoting a few Zen stories by Yoka.
On back cover and front flap quotations by Osho.
On back flap: “Formerly a professor of philosophy, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is now, without question, the most inspired, the most literate and the most profoundly informed speaker I have ever heard anywhere.
For me personally, as for so many others before me, everything he says in his philosophy of life has the unmistakable ring of truth: a new experience.
Bhagwan is all things to all men and for each individual pilgrim there is a different path to him and beyond him. And throughout his teaching runs a golden thread of sparkling humour.” Jean Lyell. VOGUE, September 15, 1977. England.
All 16 discourses in this series are with Questions and Answers.

Introduction by Sw Das Anudas. Excerpt:
“… Twenty years later, an older and, if not wiser at least luckier man, I had my first taste of Zen: one summer morning, in the late ’70’s, in the meditation hall of an ashram in India, I sat in the presence of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, who, when he walks, walks in Zen, when he sits, sits in Zen, and when he talks, appeals to every level of my being – from that persistent one which hankers to know about Zen to that one which, in those rare and lovely moments, knows!” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘The Breath Of The Soul’, on the first morning 05.03.1980.
“… I love the statement [by Yoka] that the “man of Zen walks in Zen and sits in Zen” for the simple reason that meditation cannot be just a part of your life. You cannot make a fragment of your life meditative; it is not possible to be meditative for one hour and then non-meditative for twenty-three hours. It is absolutely impossible. If you are doing that, that means your meditation is false.
Meditation can either be a twenty-four-hour affair or it cannot be at all. It is like breathing: you cannot breathe for one hour and then put it aside for twenty-three hours, otherwise you will be dead. You have to go on breathing. Even while you are asleep you have to go on breathing. Even in a deep coma you have to go on breathing.
Meditation is the breath of your soul. Just as breathing is the life of the body, meditation is the life of the soul.” (p. 1)

* Tao. The Golden Gate. Discourses on Ko Hsuan’s The Classic of Purity. Volume 1 of 2. Editor: Ma Prem Asha. Introduction: Ma Shanti Bhadra. Design: Ma Puja Abhar. Sw Dhyan Abhudaya. Direction: Ma Yoga Pratima. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International, Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, March 1984. Printed in U.S.A. First Edition. 327 pages. No illustrations. Paperback. Size: 18×11 cm. Weight: 245 g. ISBN 0-88050-646-6. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 84-42615. 10.000 copies. $4.95. Period: 11.06am – 20.06am 1980. 10 discourses. Subject: Tao. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. Discourses. Responses to Questions. Initiation Talks Between Master and Disciple. Other Titles. Books From Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Books on Bhagwan (Including: Begegnung mit Niemand. Mascha Rabben (Ma Hari Chetana) Herzschlag Verlag; Wenn das Herz frei wird. Ma Prem Gayan (Silvie Winter) Herbig). Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes.
In colophon: “The sutras of Ko Hsuan’s ‘The Classic of Poetry’ are taken from the ‘Shrine of Wisdom’ Manual No. 14 (1934), published by the Shrine of Wisdom, Fintry, Brook, Nr. Godalming, Surrey, England and are used with kind permission.”
From back cover: “Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is certainly a highly renowned international expert of singular importance in the fields of psychology, philosophy and religion. His work has contributed to my best-selling books and to the medical and psychiatric work that I do.” Harold H. Bloomfield, M.D. Psychiatrist, author.

Introduction by Ma Shanti Bhadra. Excerpt:
“Bhagwan has said “Truth is a gift” and He giftwraps it as only a Master can. Wrapped in love and tied with laughter, the gift is offered, a rare champagne that will transform your life. Enjoy this opportunity of being non-serious, of laughing, of dancing. And if you think there is no fun to have, then Tao is for you.
The magic of the Master is in every word. Sit back, take a sip and allow Bhagwan to warm your heart. He is the Master of Masters. His is the magical touch. “Life consists of small things, but if you learn how to enjoy these small things the ordinary becomes extraordinary, the mundane becomes sacred, the profane becomes profound.” CHEERS!” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Just An Empty Passage’, on the first morning 11.06.1980.
“The Classic of Purity is one of the most profound insights into nature. I call it an insight, not a doctrine, not a philosophy at all; it is existential. The man who is speaking in it is not speaking as a mind, he is not speaking as himself either; he is just an empty passage for existence itself to say something through him.
That’s how the great mystics have always lived and spoken. These are not their own words – they are no more, they have disappeared long before; it is the whole pouring through them. Their expressions may be different, but the source is the same. The words of Jesus, Zarathustra, Buddha, Lao Tzu, Krishna, Mohammed are not ordinary words; they are not coming from their memory, they are coming from their experience. They have touched the divine, and the moment you touch the divine you evaporate, you cannot exist anymore. You have to die for God to be.
This is a Taoist insight.” (p. 1)

The last discourse in the series, ‘Tao Takes Care’, on 19.06.1980, (last discourse is with Questions and Answers on 20.06.1980), finishes with the words:
“If you can meditate, start from within, then look around and then look into things at their deepest core. First mind disappears, then form disappears, then matter disappears. Then what is left? That which is left is Tao, is nature. And to live in that nature is to live in freedom, is to live in eternal bliss.,
“Tao” is the word of Ko Hsuan for God. “Dhamma” is the word of Buddha for Tao. Buddha says: Ais Dhammo sanantano – this is the eternal law. Once you have seen the eternal law you become part of eternity. Time is transcended, space is transcended. You are no more and for the first time you are. You are no more as a separate entity, but for the first time you are the whole.
This is my vision too. My agreement with Tao is absolute. I cannot say that about other religions; with Tao I can say it without any hesitation. Tao is the most profound insight that has ever been achieved on the earth.” (p. 272)

* Tao. The Golden Gate. Discourses on Ko Hsuan’s The Classic of Purity. Volume 2 of 2. Editor: Sw Krishna Prem. Introduction: Sw Krishna Prem. Design: Ma Prem Pujan. Direction: Ma Yoga Pratima. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International, Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, March 1985. Printed in U.S.A. First Edition. 296 pages. No illustrations. Paperback. Size: 18×11 cm. Weight: 220 g. ISBN 0-88050-647-4. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 84-42615. 10.000 copies. $4.95. Period: 21.06am – 30.06am 1980. 10 discourses. Subject: Tao. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. Academy of Rajneeshism Titles (Including: The Rajneesh Bible. Vol.1. $6.95. Paperback). Discourses. Responses to Questions. Initiation Talks Between Master and Disciple. Photobiographies (Including: This Very Place The Lotus Paradise, a photobiography of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and His Work, 1978-1984. $100.00. Clothbound). Books From Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Books on Bhagwan. Rajneesh Meditation Centres, Ashrams and Communes.
In colophon: “The sutras of Ko Hsuan’s ‘The Classic of Poetry’ are taken from the Shrine of Wisdom Manual No. 14 (1934), published by the Shrine of Wisdom, Fintry, Brook, Nr. Godalming, Surrey, England and are used with kind permission.”
From back cover: “Rajneesh is to the philosophy of religion what Einstein was to the philosophy of physics. He is a pivotal historical figure of great practical significance to all of us and to our collective future.” Eugene E. Graziano, Assistent University Librarian. University of California.

Introduction by Sw Krishna Prem. Excerpt:
“In this, the second volume, Bhagwan illumines the final sutras of the Taoist Master Ko Hsuan – and answers our questions. In His replies, He speaks directly to us, just where we are – shining His love and laughter and insight on our dreams and our dilemmas, on our foibles and our failings, on our wonderings and our woes. He shakes us up, wakes us up, and guides us to the gateway where light and understanding begin.
And here, standing on this threshold, your own interiority unfolds. He parts the mist and your heart sings. Suddenly you are in tune.
And to be in tune with the Master, Bhagwan says, “is to be in tune with God, with Tao, with truth. To be in tune with him is to be in tune with bliss, with beauty, with benediction.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Transcending The Transcendental’, on the third morning 23.06.1980, (two first discourses are with Questions and Answers).
“The East has respected the Masters tremendously. The West is absolute unaware of the phenomenon of the Masters. It knows the teachers, it is perfectly aware about the teachers, but not about the Masters. Even people write about Jesus as a great teacher – western scholars write about Buddha as a great teacher – not knowing the difference. The difference is immense; the difference is so immense that it is unbridgeable. The Master is a totally different world.
The teacher is part of the ordinary, day-to-day existence. He knows more than you know: the difference is of quantity, not of quality. You can know more by just a little more effort. The teacher is just a little ahead of you as far as learning, knowledge, information, is concerned, but his being is the same as yours.
The Master may not know more than you, he may not know even that much as you know, but he is more – he has more being. The difference is of quality: he exists on a dimension of which you are completely oblivious. He knows only one thing, that is his own inner being. And that knowing cannot be called knowledge for the simple reason because knowledge needs three things: the knower, the known and between the two exists the knowledge. The relationship between knower and the known: that is knowledge. But when you know yourself, the knower is the known, the knower is the knowledge; there is no distinction at all. There is no subject and no object. There is unity, not division.
The Master is one who has become united in the fundamental sense of ultimate consciousness. He is simply conscious. This consciousness gives him a totally different world view; with this consciousness everything else changes. He sees things in a new light, his eyes are unclouded. He has clarity, he is transparent, he is a pure mirror, crystal clear – not even a thought moves in his consciousness. Hence there is no more any veil, no more any obstruction.” (p. 55)

The last discourse in the series, ‘I Have Heard’, on 27.06.1980, (last three discourses are with Questions and Answers), finishes with the words:
“Worshipping is not going to help, praying is not going to help – only meditation, only understanding, only awareness. And calling Tao sacred means everything is sacred, because Tao fills everything. The whole existence is the manifestation of Tao. There is no other God than the universe. There is no other God than this very life. There is no other God than this moment, this now, this here.” (p. 186)

* Zen. The Special Transmission. Editors: Ma Prem Rajo. Ma Deva Sarito. Introduction: Ma Dhyana Samudra. Design: Ma Prem Pujan. Direction: Ma Yoga Pratima. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International, Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, December 1984. Printed in U.S.A. First Edition. 360 pages. No illustrations. Paperback. Size: 18×11 cm. Weight: 255 g. ISBN 0-88050-691-1. Library of Congress Catalog Number 84-4010. 10,000 copies. $4.95. Period: 01.07am – 10.07am 1980. 10 discourses. Subject: Zen. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. Academy of Rajneeshism Titles. Discourses. Responses to Questions. Initiation Talks Between Master and Disciple. Photobiographies (Including: Sound Of Running Water. $150.00. Clothbound). Books From Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Books on Bhagwan. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. Advertisements (Including: Rajneesh Foundation International presents: Rajneeshism. An Introduction to Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and His Religion. Edited by Academy of Rajneeshism. Revised Second Edition. $3.00. Paperback. 78 pages.
In colophon: “The Zen stories used in this book are from the ‘PRACTICE OF ZEN’ by Chang Chen-Chi, Rider & Co., 1959.”
From back cover: “Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is the best thing happening in the world today. He offers us a practical vision of a rare humanity with a sense of humor. He gives us the opportunity to create the ‘New Man’ – a man who is scientist, mystic and poet all in one – because he comes from, is in contact with, the oneness of his own being. It is this simple gift which Bhagwan offers, a simpe gift which is all anyone needs.” John McLean, actor, director. Ontario, Canada.

Introduction by Ma Dhyana Samudra. Excerpt:
“Enter into this collection of beautiful Zen stories related by the Master Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Walk through these pages as you would walk along craggy ledges cloaked in mist. Each step is a step into the unknown. These stories are Zen paintings, painted by the Master of Masters. Open any page and step into the Master’s garden. Enter silently, meditatively – the special transmission will be possible. Each leaf is as it is – perfect. Each stone and twig is just so. Walk in the garden as if for the first time.
Bhagwan describes the time of Zen as an era when simplicity of life was a cultural reality. Today, humanity is caught in the mad complexity of the mind. As never before, there is an urgent need to rediscover simplicity and innocence. This is not a journey for the mind. Put knowledge aside, and enter these tales with the eyes and ears of a child. Read as if you know nothing. A vast treasure is in your hands.
“This is called the special transmission. Nothing is transmitted and yet something has
transpired. This is the miracle of the relationship between the Master and disciple. This
is the greatest miracle in existence, there is nothing compared to it, it is
incomparable.”” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Transcending The Transcendental’, on the first morning 01.07.1980.
“We enter today into the very special world of Zen. It is very special because it is the most ordinary state of consciousness – that’s its speciality. The ordinary mind always wants to be extraordinary; it is only the extraordinary mind who relaxes into ordinariness. It is only the exceptional who is ready to relax and rest into the ordinary. The ordinary always feels inferior; out of that inferiority complex he tries to be special. The special need not make any effort to be special – he is special. There is no inferiority complex in him. He is not suffering from any emptiness. He is so full, overflowing, that he can be just whatsoever he is.
The world of Zen can be called the most special and also the most ordinary. It is a paradox if you look from the outside; if you look from the inside there is no paradox at all. It is a simple phenomenon. The rose flower, the marigold, the lotus, or just the very ordinary blade of grass, they are not trying to be special at all. From the blade of grass to the greatest star, they are all living in their suchness. There is no effort, no striving, no desire. There is no becoming. They are absolutely blissful in their being. Hence there is no comparison, no competitiveness. And there is no question of any hierarchy – who is lower and who is higher. Nobody is lower, nobody is higher. In fact, the person who is trying to prove himself higher is lower.
The person who accepts whatsoever he is with joy – not with resignation, mind you, not in despair but in deep understanding, and is grateful for it, grateful to the existence, grateful to the whole – he is he highest.” (p. 3)

The last discourse in the series, ‘The Bird Has Flown’, on 09.07.1980, (last discourse on 10.07.1980 is with Questions and Answers), finishes with the words:
“You can read the Diamond Sutra, but you will see only that which you can see, you will understand only that which you can understand. The whole point is not to know more, the whole point is to be more. The more conscious you are, then there are sutras all over the place – in the grass blades, in the rocks. Yes, sermons in the rocks and scriptures in the trees. The question is of your eyes. If you are capable to see, then God is everywhere. You need not go to a church or to a temple or to a mosque. If you have clarity, transparency of vision, then you need not read the Gita, Dhammapada, the Diamond Sutra, the Koran, the Bible. Whatsoever you read will become the Diamond Sutra, will become the Bhagavad Gita, will become the Koran – all depends on you.
Hence my insistence here is to become more meditative, not more informative, to become so meditative that you are capable of seeing through and through, so that nothing hinders your vision, so that there are no more any barriers between you and reality. When reality stands naked before you and you stand naked before reality there is benediction, there is bliss.
That’s why Zen monks, Zen Masters have even said, “Burn the scriptures.” Not that they mean literally…
Meditate over this story:
“How can a blind man read the Sutra?”
Find out your eyes. And there is no other medicine except meditation which can help to open your eyes. The words “medicine” and “meditation” come from the same root; they both mean the same. Medicine cures the body, meditation cures your innermost soul. Medicine cures the outer form, meditation cures the essential being.” (pp. 285,288)

* Theologia Mystica. Discourses on The Treatise of St. Dionysius. Editors: Ma Prem Asha. Ma Yoga Anurag. Introduction: Sw Prartho Subhan. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International, Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, July 1983, Printed in U.S.A. First Edition. 389 pages. No illustrations. Paperback. Size: 18×11 cm. Weight: 290 g. ISBN 0-88050-655-5. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 83-11086. 10,000 copies. $4.95. Period: 11.08am – 25.08am 1980. 15 discourses. Subject: Western Mystics. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. Discourses. Responses to Questions. Initiation Talks Between Master and Disciple. Books From Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Books on Bhagwan. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes.

In colophon: “Acknowledgments: The ‘Theologica Mystica of Saint Dionysius’ by Alan Watts, used by special copyright permission from the Society for Comparative Philosophy, Sausalito, California. Any further reproduction in any other form is expressly prohibited without special permission from the copyright holders.
We gratefully acknowledge the use of quotations from the essay on Edgar Allen Poe, and from the essay on Herman Melville’s “Typee” and “Omoo” used in ‘Studies In Classic American Literature’ by D.H. Lawrence. Copyright 1923, 1951, by Frieda Lawrence. Copyright 1961 by the estate of the late Mrs Frieda Lawrence. Reprinted with kind permission of Viking Penguin Inc.”
From back cover: “St. Dionysius, little known except to specialists and obscure even to them, is rediscovered and revivified in these amazing discourses of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh.
With clarity, profundity and never-ending wit, Rajneesh explicates Dionysius’ maxims, making them accessible to a generation of readers for whom St. Dionysius would otherwise be nothing more than a name in the history of theology.” David j. Burrows, M.A., Ph.D. Prof. Ret., Rutgers University.
In Contents are listed also dates of discourses and questions answered.

Introduction by Sw Prartho Subhan. Excerpts:
“What is a miracle? It happens every time someone reads the words of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and has the eyes to see even a fleeting glimpse of His grace and mystery.
My first contact with Bhagwan came in a book like this one. As He spoke (this book was not “written,” it was spoken and then transcribed) I found myself saying, “Yes! Yes!” I felt as if He touched truths inside me that I had always known, but somehow had forgotten. My appetite for His words became insatiable and I plunged into every book of His that I could find.
This love affair with Bhagwan brought me to a Rajneesh meditation center, where I heard His voice on tape. And soon, like many others before and after me, I found myself packing my bags and heading for Poona, India, to see and hear this living miracle. There I sat and heard and absorbed and laughed and cried and opened and closed and opened again and rejoiced and felt deeply blessed to have been there…
Now, in the comfort of your room or office, or wherever you are, you hold the faint shadow of His richness. And while the life-blood of His live discourses can never be captured on paper, if you let the poetry of His words – and the pauses in between – flow through you as you read, something of the divine that passes though Him will touch you…
So, now that I have hinted at what is to follow, there is one suggestion that I can offer you. Once you have read this book and tasted Bhagwan, if your thirst persists, allow it to happen. Nurture this miracle! Bhagwan has said there are many gates to the divine. If you are one of the fortunate ones, you may have just found yours.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘This Is My Prayer’, on the first morning 11.08.1980.
“Man has up to now lived in a very schizophrenic way. The reason why he has become divided is not very difficult to understand. For centuries he has been told that the world consists not of one world but of two worlds: the world of matter and the world of the spirit. This is absolute nonsense.
The world consists only of one truth. Of course, that truth has two aspects to it, but those aspects are indivisible. The outer aspect appears as matter and the inner as spirit. It is like a center and its circumference. This division has penetrated human mind in a thousand and one ways. It has become the separation between the body and the soul. It has become the separation between the lower and the higher. It has become the separation between the sin and the virtue. It has become the separation between the sinner and the saint. And it has also become the separation between the East and the West…
We are going to discuss Dionysius in this series. Dionysius is one of the greatest Buddhas ever. And whenever the Eastern scholar by any chance, if at all, comes across a person like Dionysius, he starts thinking that he must have borrowed from the East. That seems to be a tacit assumption: that the East has some monopoly over spiritualism. Nobody has any monopoly. East or West cannot make any difference in man’s spiritual growth. Jesus could become a Buddha in Jerusalem, Lao Tzu could become a Buddha in China, Dionysius could become a Buddha in Athens. There is no need to borrow from anybody…
My own experience and understanding is this: that great truths erupt in many places in almost similar ways. Lao Tzu never came to India and nobody from India ever visited Lao Tzu. China and India were divided by the great Himalayan mountains; there was no business going on between India and China, no communication of any kind. Still, what Lao Tzu says is so similar to the Upanishads, is so synonymous with the teachings of Buddha, that there is a great temptation to believe that there must have been some communication – either Buddha has borrowed from Lao Tzu or Lao Tzu has borrowed from Buddha.
But I say to you, nobody has borrowed from anybody else; they have all drunk from the same source. And when you taste the ocean, whether you taste it on an Indian shore or on the Chinese shore, it makes no difference; it always tastes the same, the same salty taste. So is truth: it has the same taste, the same flavour, the same fragrance . Maybe in expressing it there is a possibility of a few differences of language, but that does not matter much. Sometimes even those differences are not there.” (pp. 3,5)

The last discourse in the series, ‘Neither This Nor That’, on 23.08.1980, (last two discourses on 24-25.08.1980 are with Questions and Answers), finishes with these excerpts:
“The religions, particularly the organized religions, have always given three qualities to God. He is omnipotent – absolutely powerful; omniscient – knowing absolutely everything that is, that has been, that will be; and he is omnipresent – he is everywhere present, there is not a place where he is not present. The organized religion depends very much on these qualities. Why? – because people can be enslaved only if God is the suprememost power…
Shankara in India says that God is absolute affirmation: God is and the world is not. To affirm God totally he has to deny the world, all existence, because if the world has even a little bit of existence then that much existence will be less in God. To make God entire, a total, perfect affirmation, he says: Jagat mithya, the world is untrue; Brahma satya, and God is true…
Mahavira calls it moksha – freedom – and that is a far more beautiful word than “God,” because freedom cannot be worshipped – freedom does not need any priests nor does egolessness need any priests. The idea of God as somebody somewhere has created all the temples and the mosques and the churches and the whole business of priesthood, and the great exploitation has continued for centuries…
Beware of his [Dionysius’ maxim] language. He is not trying to say exactly what he feels. He says that, but immediately he camouflages it in the jargon so that he cannot be caught. And he was never caught – he succeeded. In fact, to catch him would have needed another man of the same genius, another Dionysius. Those foolish popes would not have been able to discover it. He creates so much dust of theology around it that you cannot see clearly what his point is.
And there are people all over the world who, when they cannot understand something, they think it must be profound.” [Then follows a joke to finish off the discourse]. (pp. 304,315,317,318,319)

* Guida Spirituale. Discourses on the Desiderata. Introduction by NN. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International, Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, March 1983. Printed in U.S.A. First Edition. 388 pages. No illustrations. Paperback. Size: 18×11 cm. Weight: 215 g. ISBN 0-88050-575-3. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 83-4435. 10,000 copies. $4.95. Period: 26.08am – 10.09am 1980. 16 discourses. Subject: Western Mystics. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

No mentioning of editor or crew behind this production.
In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. Discourses. Responses to Questions. Initiation Talks Between Master and Disciple. Books From Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Books on Bhagwan. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes.
In colophon: “Excerpts from the poem, At Lunchtime, A Story of Love, from the Penguin Modern Poet Series, Vol. 10, The Mersey Poets (original title: The Liverpool Scene, 1967 by Rodger McGough) are reprinted with the kind permission of A.D. Peters & Co. Ltd., London, England.”
From back cover: “Even without words, Rajneesh remains a powerful leader of one of our times’ fastest-growing religious movements.” Books & Authors, Harper & Row, U.S.A. July, 1982.
“Bhagwan’s position as an important mystic and philosopher is supported by an international following and a host of publications. His work is that of all free religious leaders – bringing God to man… Bhagwan’s lively appeal: jokes, limericks, verse, and tales, combined with traditional religious themes to reach out with his message.” Library Journal, U.S.A. April, 1982.
This discourse series is printed on paper of rather poor quality.

Introduction by NN. Excerpt:
“When I became a disciple of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, friends and family were naturally curious about what had led me to choose that path. At first, it was His words – like the words of the Desiderata, they struck some deep chord in me. He was speaking to those like myself who were fed up with the noise and haste of their lives; whose efforts to “go placidly” were nothing but exercises in hypocrisy and frustration; whose glimpses of “what peace there may be in silence” were all too brief and fleeting.
I journeyed to India, took a seat on the marble floor of an auditorium surrounded by a lush garden. The air was filled with the songs of birds, the noise of distant trains and nearby traffic. And in walked the only person I had ever seen in my life who was the very embodiment of placidness, whose silence, even when He spoke, was almost tangible. If it could happen to Him, maybe it could happen to me. I had no choice but to travel in His company…
Bhagwan’s commentary and His answers to questions from disciples and visitors bring a new richness and immediacy to the familiar and much-loved verses of the Desiderata. And its gentle and practical wisdom forms a perfect frame for those who want to see more clearly into what this living Master is all about.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Go Placidly’, on the first morning 26.08.1980.
“We enter today into one of the most beautiful worlds, that of a small document called the Desiderata. It is strange because it has appeared many times and disappeared many times; hence nobody exactly knows who wrote it. Truth has the capacity to appear again and again; because of human stupidity it is lost again and again too.
The Desiderata seems to be one of the most ancient documents available today, but it is copyrighted by a poet, Max Ehrmann. In his book of poems it is also given as a poem authored by him, copyrighted in 1927 in America, although in the first edition he talks about the legend that this small document was discovered on a plaque installed in St. Paul’s Church in Baltimore when built in 1692, but it was lost. There is no proof any more whether it was installed as a plaque in St. Paul’s Church or not. The legend is there; it has persisted. It seems Max Ehrmann again had the vision of it. It came to him as a vision. He is not really its author but only a receptacle, a medium.
This has happened to many other documents too. I happened in the case of Blavatsky’s ‘The Voice of Silence’: she is known as the authoress of the book, but the book is very ancient. She discovered it in her meditations; it appeared to her.
Many parts of Friedrich Nietzsche’s ‘Thus Spake Zarathustra’ are also very ancient, and the same is the case with Omar Khayyam’s ‘Rubaiyat’. Mabel Collin’s ‘Light on the Path’ is of the same category, Kahlil Gibran’s ‘The Prophet’ also.
I have looked into all Max Ehrmann’s poems but no other poem has the same quality, not even a single poem. If the Desiderata was written by him then many more poems of the same quality would have flowed. It has not happened. In fact, the Desiderata seems to be so different from all his poems that it is impossible to believe that it has come from the same person.
The same is true about Mabel Collins’ ‘Light on the Path’. These are strange documents. The possibility is that they have always existed – again and again lost visibly, but truth manifests itself… Whenever there is a vulnerable soul, a receptive person, truth again starts flowing through him. And of course the person will think, “I am writing it.”
It is because of this fact that the Upanishads have no names of authors; nobody knows who wrote them, because the people who received them were very alert and aware. They were mystics, not only poets.
This is the difference between the poet and the mystic: when something happens to the mystic he is perfectly aware that it is from the beyond, it is not from him. He is immensely glad; he rejoices that he has been chosen as a vehicle, as a medium, but his ego cannot claim it. In fact, you become a mystic only when you have dropped the ego. But the poet is full of the ego – not always but almost always. Once in a while, when he forgets his ego, he touches the same world that is the mystic’s world. But the mystic lives there; the poet once in a while gets a glimpse of it. And because his ego is not dead he immediately claims it as his creation. But all the ancient seers were aware of it.
The Vedas, the Bible, the Koran, the three greatest scriptures of the world, are known not to have been written by anyone. The Vedas are known as apaurusheya – not written by any person. Certainly somebody wrote them, but they are from God, from the beyond, from some unknown source. The mystic becomes possessed by it, he dances to its tune. He is no more himself – he is it. The poet once in a while gets a glimpse of it, a faraway glimpse.
In Sanskrit we have two words for the poet; in no other language is it so, because no other part of the world became alert, very alert about this fact. In Sanskrit one word is kavi; kavi exactly means the poet. The other word is rishi; rishi means a mystic poet. The difference is great. The poet has a deep aesthetic sense, he is very sensitive; he can penetrate into the very core of things. He has a way of knowing which is not that of the scientist. He does not analyze, he loves; his love is great, but his ego is alive. So when he looks at a roseflower he comes closer than the scientist, because the scientist immediately starts dissecting the flower, and to dissect something is to kill it. The very effort of knowing is an effort to kill…
Hence the poet reaches closer than the scientist. The poet does not dissect the flower, he falls in love. He is immensely glad, he rejoices in the flower, and out of that rejoicing a song is born. But he is still far away from the mystic, the rishi. The mystic becomes one with the flower. The observer becomes the observed; there is no distinction left.” (p. 1)

The last discourse in the series, ‘Child of the Universe’, on 07.09.1980, (last three discourses on 08-10.10.1980 are with Questions and Answers), finishes with the words:
“Being a sannyasin simply means that you have decided to remain in an unconscious state no longer. And the moment you wake up, all misery disappears. Suddenly you find all is joy, all is bliss, all is benediction. Your very being is the kingdom of God. Jesus says again and again, “The kingdom of God is within you,” and you are seeking it outside; that’s why you are miserable. It is inside and you are seeking outside – you will never find it.
Hence the broken dreams, the drudgery, the boredom, the fed-upness, the tired, exhausted feeling, and the constant complaining, grumbling mood. You are surrounded by nos.
You can live as a yes, and to live as a yes is to be religious. To say “Yes! Yes! Yes! Yes!” to existence is to be religious.” (p. 295)

Excerpts from last discourses:
“The last question.
Bhagwan,
Are you sure that you get the jokes that you are telling us?
Anand Paramo,
I am not as thrunk as you dink!” (p. 343)
“In that silence is the truth. That silence is the shrine of the truth. Enter into it. Take the jump into it. That is the essential thing. If you miss it you miss your whole life and the great opportunity that life has given to you. If you reach this essential core you are blessed, you have arrived home.
That is the message of the Desiderata and that is my message too.” (p. 368)

* I Am That. Discourses On The Isa Upanishad. Editor: Ma Prem Apa. Introduction: Ma Mary Catherine. Design: Ma Prem Tushita. Direction: Ma Yoga Pratima. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International, Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, July 1984. Printed in U.S.A. First Edition. 408 pages. No illustrations. Paperback. Size: 18×11 cm. Weight: 270 g. ISBN 0-88050-580-X. Library of Congress Catalog Number 84-42809. 10,000 copies. $5.95. Period: 11.10am – 26.10am 1980. 16 discourses. Subject: The Upanishads. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. Discourses. Responses to Questions (Be Still and Know. From Sex to Superconsciousness. The Goose is Out. My Way: The Way of the White Clouds. Walking in Zen, Sitting in Zen. Walk Without Feet, Fly Without Wings and Think Without Mind. Zen: Zest, Zip, Zap and Zing). Initiation Talks Between Master and Disciple. Books From Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Books on Bhagwan (Including: Rajneeshpuram – Fest des Foiedeus und der Liebe. Sannyas Verlag). Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes.
Alternate title: Living in Your Own Light.
In colophon: “Acknowledgement: Translations copyright Alistair Shearer and Peter Russell. From “The Upanishads”, published by Wildwood House Ltd., London, 1978.”
From back cover: “Bhagwan was the first person I came across who challenged both the acuity of my intellect and the feeling of my heart… Bhagwan is one of those rare human being who seems to consistently personify freedom for the people who meet him… He simply is himself and the compassion he radiates inspires the sense of authenticity of those who some to him.” Dr. Jim Garrison, Ph.D. Graduate, Harvard Divinity School. Director, East West Reach, London.

Introduction by Ma Mary Catherine. Excerpts:
“Twenty-five centuries before Buddha, the Isa Upanishad was transmitted from the ancient Masters to their disciples. How mystical the verses seem today.
AUM
That is the Whole.
This is the Whole.
From wholeness emerges Wholeness,
Wholeness coming from wholeness,
Wholeness still remains.
These first few lines are the “seed mantra” within which the entire Upanishad is enclosed. Yet they have remained a mystery for centuries.
Now, today, alive, is an enlightened Master, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. He has breathed life back into these ancient verses with radiant metaphors.
Imagine, He says, a lighted candle, from which another candle is lit. The original candle is not diminished. From light, light has emerged, and yet light still remains. With this single metaphor. Bhagwan illuminates the whole sutra…
As this seed mantra encapsulates the whole of the Isa Upanishad, so, from these discourses, the spirit of Bhagwan comes to life. Upanishad means “coming to a Master”, sitting with Him, opening to Him so totally that communion is possible.
Here with these clear metaphors, stories and jokes, we are introduced to the perspective of an enlightened Master – a world view so total that it is more than a world view, it is cosmic, a rebirth of the spirit of the Upanishads.
Beyond the words on these pages, we can perceive a glimpse of His silence too. Watch for the pauses that occur, feel them and experience the depth possible with this Master. Discover meditation, He says – just close your eyes.
Somehow it is the jokes that bring us to experience the wholeness of Bhagwan. Laugh and be one with Him.
Marvel at how easily Bhagwan turns from unfolding the mystical to telling a joke; just as easily, He goes on to relate how a joke works, and how His religiousness is based in a sense of humor.
The ancient seers would love this illumination of their mysteries. With Bhagwan as the guide, fifty centuries are immediately bridged.
We are privileged. We can read and slip into meditativeness, laugh and go beyond with Him. The mysterious truth is within our understanding for He Himself is that, and if we understand it rightly, so it [is] all that lives.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘Beyond The Changing’, on the first morning 11.10.1980.
“We are entering today into one of the most enchanting and mysterious worlds – that of the Upanishads. The days of the Upanishads were the highest as far as the spiritual quest is concerned. Never before and never afterwards has human consciousness achieved such Himalayan heights.
The days of the Upanishads were really golden, for many reasons. The most important of them is contained in this seed mantra:
AUM
Purnamadah
Purnamidam
Purnat purnamudachyate
Purnasya purnamadaya
purnameva vashishyate
The emphasis of the Upanishads is on wholeness. Remember, it is not on perfection but on wholeness. The moment one becomes interested in being perfect, the ego enters in. The ego is a perfectionist – the desire of the ego is to be perfect – and perfection drives humanity towards insanity.
Wholeness is totally different; its flavor is different. Perfection is in the future: it is a desire. Wholeness is herenow: it is a revelation. Perfection has to be achieved, and of course every achievement takes time; it has to be gradual. You have to sacrifice the present for the future, the today for the tomorrow. And the tomorrow never comes; what comes is always today…
Wholeness is of the now. If you can be simply here, then this very moment the revelation! Then it is not gradual, it is sudden, it is an explosion!
The word upanishad is tremendously important. It simply means sitting down close to a Master; it is a communion. The Master is living in wholeness; he is living herenow, he is pulsating herenow. His life has a music, his life has a joy, a silence of immense depth. His life is full of light.
Just to sit silently by the side of a Master is enough, because the presence of a Master is infectious, the presence of the Master is overwhelming. His silence starts reaching to your very heart. His presence becomes a magnetic pull on you: it pulls you out of the mud of the past and the future. It brings you into the present.” (p. 3)

The last discourse in the series, ‘Prayer Simply Happens’, on 23.10.1980, (last three discourses on 24-26.10.1980 are with Questions and Answers), finishes with the words:
“Unless you have found your ultimate being you have not found anything, remember. And go on praying to God that we should not be diverted…
Meditation is effort, prayer is surrender. Meditation is your doing, prayer is becoming available to God; whatsoever he wants to do with you, you are ready. It is submission, it is devotion, but devotion comes only after meditation.” (p. 312)

* Philosophia Ultima. Discourses on the Mandukya Upanishad. Editor: Ma Yoga Anurag. Introduction: Sw Anand Madyapa. Design: Sw Dhyan Abhudaya. Direction: Ma Yoga Pratima. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International, Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, December 1983. Printed in U.S.A. First Edition. 372 pages. No illustrations. Paperback. Size: 18×11 cm. Weight: 285 g. ISBN 0-88050-617-2. Library of Congress Catalog Number 83-043216. 10,000 copies. $4.95. Period: 11.12.am – 26.12am 1980. 16 discourses. Subject: The Mandukya and Isa Upanishads. Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. Discourses. Responses to Questions. Initiation Talks Between Master and Disciple [Error in order of printed pages]. Books From Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Books on Bhagwan. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes.
In colophon: “Translations copyright Alistair Shearer and Peter Russel from THE UPANISHADS published by Wildwood House Ltd., London, 1978.”
“These discourses are based on the sutras of the Mandukya and Isa Upanishads.” (Osho. Books on CD-ROM. 1994)
Sutras are presented in Hindi with transcription in Roman characters. This is the last discourses series from Poona with a theme taken from religious scriptures. The following series until March 1981 are all with Questions and Answers.
From back cover: “…The vast religious and mystical understanding of this man is one of the world’s greatest riches today. And the more widespread His influence becomes, the more will Christian and Buddhist, Moslem, Hindu and Jew come to understand and value what is common in all their religious traditions. I have never heard anyone so beautifully and playfully integrate and then dissolve the philosophical, religious and psychological problems which, for generations, have sapped our human energies.” Reverend Richard Douglas Cain. Chaplain, Churchill College. Cambridge University.

Introduction by Sw Anand Madyapa. Excerpts:
“If you can read this book without experiencing at least one deep belly laugh, there is no hope for you; your doors and windows are not only closed but nailed shut. Within these pages, the uniqueness, beauty, penetrating insight and crystal clarity of the enlightened Master, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, is revealed. His compassion and loving acceptance is demonstrated time after time as He helps us to see the world, reality, ourselves, with the blinders removed. Bhagwan doesn’t apologize or compromise nor does He ask for our acceptance or respect. He simply says what He has to say, pointing out that tomorrow He might contradict Himself completely. Some of His statements are so totally new and unexpected, you may feel your whole perspective shifting…
As you enter into these sutras of the Mandukya Upanishad and read the response to disciples’ questions, don’t be surprised to find your traditional beliefs shaken. If you find tears in your eyes, know that He has touched your heart, for above all, Bhagwan is a Master of the Heart. You may feel hurt, but if you look a little deeper, you may come to see that only one who loves unconditionally cares enough to make you look at the rubbish of life as well as the diamonds. And if you’ll put aside your rational mind and open your heart, just a little, maybe you’ll recognize the gifts Bhagwan is offering – deep communion with the Master, and a glimpse of what is possible.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘This Is The Bridge To That’, on the first morning 11.12.1980.
AUM
That is the Whole.
This is the Whole.
From wholeness emerges Wholeness,
Wholeness coming from wholeness,
Wholeness still remains.
“This is one of the most significant statements ever made anywhere on the earth at any time. It contains the whole secret of the mystic approach towards life. This small sutra contains the essence of the Upanishadic vision. Neither before nor afterwards has the vision been transcended; it still remains the Everest of human consciousness. And there seems to be no possibility of going beyond it.
The Upanishadic vision is that the universe is a totality, indivisible; it is an organic whole. The parts are not separate, we are all existing in a togetherness: the trees, the mountains, the people, the birds, the stars, howsoever far away they may appear – don’t be deceived by the appearance – they are all interlinked, all bridged. Even the smallest blade of grass is connected to the farthest star, and it is as significant as the greatest sun…
That’s what science has been doing with reality – dissecting it, analyzing it. Analysis is destructive. What is needed is a unifying vision, a synthesis. And that is the Upanishadic approach: the part becomes the whole, the whole becomes the part. There is no hierarchy in the Upanishadic vision of life. Nothing is lower, nothing is higher, nothing is mundane and nothing is sacred – all is one.” (p. 1)

The last discourse in the series, ‘Make It Your Only Longing’, on 23.12.1980, (last three discourses, Wholeness on 24-26.12.1980 are with Questions and Answers), finishes with the words:
“My effort here is to prepare the ground or the new man. Sannyas, according to me, is only a preparation to herald the new man. Hence I am teaching you the philosophia ultima. This is the ultimate philosophy: the method, the technique, the device, to reach the fourth. Make it your only longing, your only desire. Become this longing, that you have to reach the fourth. And once you are committed, involved, there is no reason why you cannot reach – it is your potential, it is your birthright.” (p. 287)

1981 Talks in Buddha Hall

* Zen: Zest, Zip, Zap and Zing. Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Responding To Disciples’ And Visitors’ Questions. Editor: Ma Prem Asha. Introduction: Sw Devageet. Design: Sw Anand Neeraj. Cover Design: Sw Govinddas. Photography: Sw Krishna Bharti. Typesetting: Graphic Systems. Poona. Processing: Rajneesh Foundation. Poona. Printing: Army & Navy Press. Bombay. Binding: Rajneesh Foundation. Poona. Production Team: Sw Premabhakta. Sw Deva Anuragi. Sw Prem Deekshant. Ma Prem Namra. Ma Anand Parinita. Sw Sat Samudaya. Ma Anand Suryo. Sw Anand Satprem. Sw Anand Vijayo. Sw Anand Peter. Ma Viren. Sw Samantbhadra. Sw Anand Hartmut. Ma Anand Nirala. Sw Prem Govindo. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Dipika. Publisher: Ma Yoga Laxmi. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, March 1981. First Edition. 452 pages. Lavishly illustrated. Quality paperback/Unbound. Size: 22×14,5 cm. Weight: 645 g. ISBN 0-88050-692-X (label). 1,000 hardbound copies. 4,000 paperback copies. Period: 27.12am 1980 – 10.01am1981. 15 discourses. Subject. Questions and Answers. Vimalkirti’s Death. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Publications From Rajneesh Foundation. Discourses by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Responses to Questions. Darshan Diaries. Books by Other Publishers. Books on Bhagwan. Translations. Major Book Distributors and Suppliers. Rajneesh Meditation Centers.
In colophon: “Grateful acknowledgement is given for the title of this book taken from SEEING THE LIGHT copyright 1977 by James Broughton. Reprinted by permission of City Lights Books.”
Photo section with two pages of biography followed by 69 pages with colour and b/w photos from the former Prince Welf of Hannover, Sw Anand Vimalkirti’s life and his death celebration which took place during this discourse series.
This is the last discourse series to be published in Poona, March 1981. Other yet unpublished discourse series from Poona One were to be published as paperbacks from Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, 1982-1985.
From front inner cover: “Zen is another word for Zest. For zip and zap and zing. If you have no appetite for life as it is, and are not excited by the koan of what this life is about, then Zen is not for you.” James Broughton (See text in colophon).
On back inner cover: “The ashram in Poona actually appears as one of the most audacious and fruitful attempts at mixing thousand-year-old traditions with modern Western therapy techniques… It is, at the same time, a meditation centre, a place for celebration and a vast laboratory where new techniques for the exploration of consciousness are devised.” Chatelaine. January 1981. Canada.
“Shree Rajneesh delivers his theses with humour and rhetorical brilliance, indeed complacent, but with an irony that actually enchants and exhilarates.” Der Spiegel. March 1981. Germany.
“Rajneesh is a.. “Master of the absurd and unknown whose beauty, magnetism and mastery lead you through the mind beyond the mind.”” Avgo. December 1980. Greece.

Introduction by Sw Devageet. Excerpts:
“”Zen is living your life passionately, intensely, ecstatically…. Now… this very moment. Mind lives in the past or the future. Zen is a tremendous blow to the mind – Zap – it stops! Immediately you are beyond. Zen is a device for sudden enlightenment.” These are the words of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, an enlightened Master, living and celebrating in Poona, India. Now… this very moment. A vast energy field is being created by Bhagwan. Its purpose is to awaken those with enough trust, awareness and courage, into their own reality. Bhagwan is bringing about the birth of Buddha-consciousness, and it is happening. Now… this very moment. Zest, Zip, Zap and Zing sums up the process beautifully…
In the last discourse of this book Bhagwan talks about the whole event… the final transcendence of Sw Anand Vimalkirti, the blessed one.” (No page number)

In his last discourse Chapter 15 in this series, ‘The Philousia: Life, Love, Laughter’ on 10.01.1981, Osho speaks on the death of Vimalkirti. Excerpt:
“My whole approach is of celebration. Religion to me is nothing but the whole spectrum of celebration, the whole rainbow, all the colours of celebration. Make it a great opportunity for yourself, because in celebrating his departure many of you can reach to greater heights, to new dimensions of being; it will be possible. These are the moments which should not be missed; these are the moments which should be used to their fullest capacity.
I am happy with him…and many of you are getting ready in the same way. I am happy with my people! I don’t think there has ever been a Master who had so many beautiful disciples. Jesus was very poor in that sense – not a single disciple became enlightened. Buddha was the richest in the past, but I am determined to defeat Gautam the Buddha!…
It is 9.05, and I agreed with Vimalkirti that at 8.30 he would leave the body, so he must have left the body. At 9.30 he will be here, and I will be coming back to give him a send-of. Get ready, rejoice, dance – dance to abandon! Let him go like a prince. He was a prince. Everyone of my sannyasins is a prince.
I don’t believe in beggars, I believe only in emperors.” (pp. 343,350)

* The Wild Geese and The Water. Responses to Questions From Disciples and Visitors. Editor: Sw Krishna Prabhu. Introduction: Ma Krishna Gopa. Design: Ma Anand Sahajo. Direction: Ma Yoga Pratima. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, July 1985. Printed in the U.S.A. First Edition. 408 pages. Drawings of wild geese flying. Paperback. Size: 18×11 cm. Weight: 300 g. ISBN 0-88050-673-3. Library of Congress Catalog Number 85-43053. 10,000 copies. $4.95. Period: 11.02am – 24.02am 1981. 14 discourses. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

In Appendix: Books By Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. Academy of Rajneeshism Titles. (Including Biographies: Books I have Loved. Paperback. Notes of a Madman. $4.50 Quality Paperback. Glimpses of a Golden Childhood. Quality Paperback). Discourses. Responses to Questions. Initiation Talks Between Master and Disciple. Books From Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Books on Bhagwan. U.S. Distributors. Overseas Distributors. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes.

Introduction by Ma Krishna Gopa:
“At this time of year, you can see the wild geese returning North, flying in ragged V-formation against a pale blue sky. The creeks are full and clear; the banks grown thick with reeds and cattails. The water reflects the grasses, the sky, the clouds, the flying birds. It is so simple.
The wild geese do not
intend to cast
their reflections.
The water has no
mind to receive
their image…
Each is simply, and only, itself. It’s only a man who somehow gets confused, and thinks he must cast his reflection somewhere, or if he is the grass, he should be the sky, or if he is the water, he should be the bird, or the wind or anything but what he is. So in the end, he can neither flow, nor fly, nor let the wind carry him.
This book is simply an invitation to yourself. As Bhagwan speaks to disciples and other friends, no matter what their problem and confusion, His invitation is the same. You are what you are, and it is perfect. If only you could see your reflection clearly, you would see…
I can remember a lifetime of feeling that somehow, I had been made just plain wrong, that no matter what I did, it wouldn’t be as good as, as clever as, as something as, someone else. I never would have thought the answer was myself.
Yet listening to Bhagwan, living with Him, sitting in His silence, dancing in His presence, He has shown me myself, though I still don’t know what it is. I only know that I am learning that I, too, am as simple and as perfect as the creeks and the rushes and the earth and the sky. Someday, I guess, I will remember it for good.
But take this invitation.
It is an invitation to find yourself, your truth, your fire, your freedom.
What more could you ask.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, Lecture 1, ‘An Escape To Reality’, on the first morning 11.02.1981.
The first question:
“Bhagwan, Do you have a message for sannyasins and friends gathering at the Café Royal, London, for the “March Event”? Anand Poonam.
… My message, Anand Poonam, for the March Event in London, where thousands of sannyasins are gathering together for the first time to celebrate a new opening: the British Buddhafield… This is my message, tell them: Get rid of the past and the future, and live herenow! It is suicidal to live anywhere else than herenow, because each moment that is passing is precious, so precious that you cannot get it back. Don’t waste it!…

Lecture 13, ‘The Immediate Is The Ultimate’. The first question:
… Do you prepare them [your sannyasins] for the inevitable future? – the future does exist. Most of them have thirty to forty years yet to live. Will they stay in Poona for the rest of their lives? I don’t think so. I would appreciate your comments. Rami Gilboa.
… Thousands of my sannyasins are working around the earth, and everybody is growing. They cannot lose because it is not a question of gain, if you gain something you can lose. Here you lose! You lose everything. I don’t leave anything with you to lose anywhere else. I do my job totally. I finish you completely! So what is there to lose whether you are here or anywhere else?
Yes, somewhere else, you will become more aware what a tremendous transformation has happened to you. So once in a while I send my people. It is a good experience… I have never come across future. So why should I prepare them for something which I never come across? And I know they are not going to come across either… You are talking simply nonsense. Only the present exists… If you can live now, totally, then the next moment will also be now, and next to that will also be now. It is always now, tomorrow never comes.
And why thirty, forty years? My people are going to live for eternity. They have found eternity, but it is not future, it is present. So I prepare them only for the present, not for the future. But the only way to understand me is to become a sannyasin…”

One of my sannyasins, Yoga Suresh, has written:
“Bhagwan, recently J. Krishnamurti was talking at Bombay, and I also attended with a lot of my sannyasin friends. On the very first day, after sitting on the stage, he took one glance at us and then said: “This is not a place of amusement, dance, music, and enjoyment. Therefore, if anybody has come here for joy or something else, he should leave the premises right now.”
He has also mentioned very often in his talks that: “All foreigners who come to India are trapped by the so-called Bhagwan, who gives them colored clothes to wear and a necklace of beads or a mala, and he teaches them, the ignorant western people, to sing and dance to Hollywood music, et cetera, et cetera. And they call it meditation.”
Bhagwan, as you always praise him and his teachings in your lectures, why does he have a grudge against you? He does not even have the courage to say it directly to you by using your name as you use his name. Why is this so?”
So Chris, if you are worried about enlightenment, that what will happen, this is the only place where you need not be worried. But you will have to avoid people like J. Krishnamurti. He is too serious, so deadly serious, as if he has the responsibility to transform the whole world. He is carrying the burden, and he is becoming every day more and more angrier because nothing is happening. People still go on dancing, people still go on enjoying music, he said…”

Lecture 14, The Bird Has Flown. The last question:
“Bhagwan, Why are the Indians so intolerant and so much angry at you? Radhe.
It is very simple. They are very religious people, the only religious people in the world, very spiritual. This is the sign of their spirituality, their religiousness – the so-called religious always become fanatics. They talk about tolerance, but they are very intolerant. In fact, the very idea of becoming tolerant has the seed of intolerance in it…
Pundit Lajjashankara Jha has asked two things:
Why are not the Indians allowed to participate in the therapy groups?
… Indians are not allowed for the simple reason that they cannot open themselves. They have become the most closed people in the world. Even if they cannot understand what I am saying here, how they can go into a really deep therapeutic situation? It will be impossible for them…” (pp. 3,5,320,334,368,376,379)

* The Goose Is Out. Introduction: Sw Anand Subhuti. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela. Rajneesh Foundation International, Antelope, Oregon, July 1982. Printed in USA. First Edition. 299 pages. No illustrations. Quality paperback. Size: 18,5×12,5 cm. Weight: 335 g. ISBN 0-88050-571-0. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 82-60497. 10,000 copies. $10.95. Period: 01.03am – 10.03am 1981. 10 discourses. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Buddha Hall. Poona.

No mentioning of editor and crew behind this production.
In Appendix on orange paper: Books Published by Rajneesh Foundation International. Discourses of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Response to Questions. Intimate Dialogues between the Master and His disciples. Books From Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Books on Bhagwan. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes.
Following the Introduction: “These ten discourses are the last spoken doctrines and testament of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. They were given in response to questions from disciples and visitors from March 1st through 10th, 1981 at the Shree Rajneesh Ashram in Poona, India.”
Photo on front cover from an early photo session on the Ranch, similar to the cover of ‘The Book of the Books’, Volume 1, published same month in Oregon, July 1982.
On back cover: “The last lecture series before Bhagwan stopped speaking forever. This book is a MUST for every sannyasin and lovers of Bhagwan.”
On front flap: “”The Goose Is Out” is a Zen Koan which captures in a most unexpected way the whole absurdity of the human condition. Zen reveals the comi-tragedy of our life-long situation in which we voluntarily remain ignorant of our true nature as enlightened beings. The reason why we do this – why we choose to remain beggars instead of emperors, asleep instead of awake, unconscious instead of conscious, are explained by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, the enlightened Master, in this precious book. With compassion, with humor and with profound understanding, he shows us the investments we all have in not remembering our birthright.
This book will make you laugh, make you cry, make you bewildered and angry. It will, if you allow it, penetrate through all the prejudices and beliefs which you have gathered about you as protection against the truth. It will, with your permission, penetrate to the very core of your being and there gently light a flame. This is Bhagwan’s last book – a record of the last ten discourses he ever uttered. It is a tremendous effort to announce to you the breath-taking beauty of your being. It is nothing less than a declaration of your divinity.”
On back flap: “Bhagwan’s position as an important mystic and philosopher is supported by an international following and a host of publications. His work is that of all great religious leaders – bringing God to man… Bhagwan’s lively appeal: jokes, limericks, verse, and tales combine with traditional religious themes to reach out with his message.” Library Journal. April, 1982. U.S.A.
“It’s not that he’s offering a new spiritual dogma; rather, he stresses that the path to enlightenment, to knowing God, is through knowing oneself.” New Age. January, 1982. U.S.A.

Introduction by Sw Anand Subhuti. Excerpts:
“This is the last series of discourses given in English by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, the enlightened Master, who in the seven years between 1974 and 1981 gave a two-hour discourse every morning to an international audience of disciples and seekers at Shree Rajneesh Ashram in Poona, India.
This final series was delivered in Buddha Hall in March 1981. Shortly afterwards, Bhagwan began the ultimate stage of his work, replacing verbal communication with satsang: a direct, silent heart-to-heart communion between the Master and his disciples.
Many times in his discourses, Bhagwan had said that truth cannot be expressed through words – that it is a special transmission beyond all scriptures. And this is something which all great Masters down through the ages have observed: that the ultimate truth can never be said, has never been said, will never be said…
Bhagwan’s approach to spirituality is also non-serious. His discourses sparkle with paradoxes and humor, anecdotes and outrageous jokes. He is not trying to convey any doctrine, because he knows that the experience of truth cannot be contained in any dogma or system of beliefs.
In fact, he does his best to shatter all our beliefs, and that is one thing which will become very apparent as you read this book. It is a shattering experience. It will provoke you, confront you with your prejudices and beliefs. It will nudge you in the ribs, poke you in the eye, and by the end you will probably feel as if you have been hit hard on the head… in much the same way as, in ancient times, Zen students used to feel when the Master crept up behind them and gave them a good whack with his staff…
For example, take the beautiful Zen story about the goose in the bottle, from which this book takes its title and theme. The story goes like this:
The official, Riko, once asked Nansen to explain to him the old problem of the goose in
the bottle.
“If a man puts a gosling into a bottle,” said Riko, “and feeds him until he is full-grown,
how can the man get the goose out without killing it or breaking the bottle?”
Nansen gave a great clap with his hands and shouted, “Riko!”
“Yes, Master,” said the official with a start.
“See,” said Nansen, “The goose is out!”
The story is symbolic: the goose represents our consciousness – that part of our being which is already enlightened – and the bottle is the mind. Our consciousness is trapped in the bottle of the mind. How to get it out without destroying the mind?
Zen’s whole effort is to show the disciple the absurdity of this situation, in which every spiritual seeker finds himself, or herself. And the absurdity is that our consciousness has never been limited to the mind, nor confined by its ideas. Consciousness is always free, unbounded, and there is not better way of demonstrating this than by a sudden shout, a shock, a good hit on the head from the Master.
So go into this book non-seriously, playfully, and whenever you feel offended by the jokes and statements which Bhagwan makes, remember that there is a hidden purpose in it. He is simply trying to wake us up, hit us on the head, startle us into great awareness.
That awareness brings insight into the foolishness of all our beliefs, all our ideas, all our words and concepts. Truth is beyond thought, beyond expression. It knows only laughter and silence – and the special transmission which happens between the Master and his disciples.” (No page number)

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘The Goose is Out’, on the first morning 01.03.1981.
“The first question
Bhagwan,
Is the goose really out?
Anand Bhavo, the goose has never been in, the goose has always been out. It is a Zen koan. First you have to understand the meaning of Zen and the meaning of a koan.
Zen is not a religion, not a dogma, not a creed. Zen is not even a quest, an inquiry; it is non-philosophical. The fundamental of the Zen approach is that all is as it should be, nothing is missing. This very moment everything is perfect. The goal is not somewhere else, it is here, it is now. Tomorrows don’t exist. This very moment is the only reality. Hence in Zen there is no distinction between methods and goals, means and goals…
Hence the most fundamental thing to understand about Zen is: The goose has never been in. Let me tell you the story how this koan started:
A great philosophical official, Riko, once asked the strange Zen Master, Nansen, to
explain to him the old koan of the goose in the bottle.
“If a man puts a gosling into a bottle,” said Riko, “and feeds him until he is full-grown,
how can the man get the goose out without killing it or breaking the bottle?”
Nansen gave a great clap with his hands and shouted, “Riko!”
“Yes, Master,” said the official with a start.
“See,” said Nansen, “The goose is out!”
It is only a question of seeing, it is only a question of becoming alert, awake, it is only a question of waking up. The goose is in the bottle if you are in a dream; the goose has never been in the bottle if you are awake. And in the dream there is no way to take the goose out of the bottle. Either the goose will die or the bottle will have to be broken, and both alternatives are not allowed: neither has the bottle to be broken nor has the goose to be killed. Now, a fully-grown goose in a small bottle… how can you take it out? This is called a koan.
A koan is not an ordinary puzzle; it is not a puzzle because it cannot be solved. A puzzle is that which has a possibility of being solved; you just have to look for the right answer. You will find it – it only needs intelligence to find the answer to the puzzle; but a puzzle is not really insoluble.
A koan is insoluble; you cannot solve it, you can only dissolve it. And the way to dissolve it is to change the very plane of your being from dreaming to wakefulness.” (p. 2)

In his last discourse in this series,’ Dissolved in My People’, on 10.03.1981, Osho talks on his message, on when he is not here any more and the work in his Buddhafield. Excerpts:
“The moment the Master is gone, you have only the words. Words can be manipulated, words can be interpreted, words can be colored and painted according to your prejudices. But, Binoy Thomas, as far as I am concerned, it will be impossible – for many reasons it will be impossible.
First, I am a man who is consistently inconsistent. It will not be possible to make a dogma out of my words; anybody trying to make a creed or dogma out of my words will go nuts!” You can make a dogma out of Mahavira – he is a very consistent man, very logical. You can make a philosophy out of Buddha – he is very mathematical. You can make a philosophy out of Krishnamurti – for fifty years he has simply been repeating the same thing again and again; you cannot find a single inconsistency in him. On the one hand he says, “I am not your Master, your guru. Don’t depend on me,” but in a subtle way he is creating the whole philosophy – which is so consistent, so utterly consistent, that everybody would like to be imprisoned in it, it is so sane.
It is impossible with me: I live in the moment, and whatsoever I am saying right now is true only for this moment. I have no reference with my past, and I don’t think of the future at all. So my statements are atomic; they are not part of a system. And you can make a dead institution only when a philosophy is very systematic, when there are no more flaws, when no fault can be found, when all doubts are solved, all questions dissolved, and you are given a ready-made answer to everything in life.
I am so inconsistent that it is impossible to create a dead institution around me, because a dead institution will need the infrastructure of a dead philosophy. I am not teaching you any doctrine, I am not giving you any principles; on the contrary, I am trying to take away all the philosophies that you have carried all along. I am destroying your ideologies, creeds, cults, dogmas, and I am not replacing them with anything else. My process is of pure deconditioning. I am not trying to recondition you. I will leave you open.
Hence, you can see it here, all my sannyasins are unique individuals. There is no certain pattern into which they have to fit themselves. There is no “should,” “should not,” there is no rigid structure, but only a liquidity. I am not giving you the Ten Commandments, I am not giving you detailed information on how to live, because I believe in the individual and the individual’s dignity and his freedom. I am sharing my vision – that is my joy – but it is not being shared in order that you should try to live up to it.” (p. 267)

“You [Binoy Thomas] ask me
When you leave your body will the ashram become a dead institution and will you just become deified and forgotten?
I am not leaving anything to anybody. I have declared myself Bhagwan. I am not leaving anything to anybody. Why should I leave it to anybody? I know I am the Blessed One, and only I can know. How can anybody else know it? And I am trying to seduce my people into understanding this immensity: that they are also the blessed ones. It is impossible to deify me – I have already done it! What else is there left for you? I don’t depend on anybody.
Before I leave the world, one thing I am certainly going to do – it is private, so please don’t tell anybody else – before I leave the world, I am going to declare all of my sannyasins blessed ones. Thousands of Bhagwans all over the world! There will be no need to make any special nook and corner for me, I will be dissolved in my people. Just as you can taste the sea from any place and it is salty, you will be able to taste any of my sannyasins and you will find the same taste: the taste of Bhagwan, the taste of the Blessed One.
I am waiting for the right moment.
Once the new commune is established, all my sannyasins will be called Bhagwans. Then it really will be a Bhagwan movement.” (p. 276)

Osho finishes the entire flow of his Poona One discourses in English with these words:
“… This is the most difficult thing for humanity to accept. Hence, so much opposition to me, because I am telling you that you are Gods, that you are Buddhas, that there is no other God than you. That is the most difficult thing to accept. You would like to be a sinner, you would like to be guilty, you would like to be thrown into hell, but you cannot accept that you are a Buddha, an awakened one, because then all problems are solved. And when problems are solved, you start disappearing. And to disappear into the whole is the only thing of any worth, is the only thing of any significance.
What I am telling to you is not a teaching. This place is a device, this is a Buddhafield. I have to take away things which you don’t have, and I have to give you things which you already have. You need not be grateful to me at all, because I am not giving you anything new, I am simply helping you to remember.
You have forgotten the language of your being. I have come to recognize it – I have remembered myself. And since the day I remembered myself I have been in a strange situation: I feel compassion for you, and deep down I also giggle at you, because you are not really in trouble. You don’t need compassion, you need hammering, you need to be hit hard on the head. Your suffering is bogus. Ecstasy is your very nature.
You are truth.
You are love.
You are bliss.
You are freedom.”
(p. 286)
 

Sources Home Contents Vol III