Bibliography_part7_test

Bibliography
Poona Two 1987 – 1990

Discourses
Compilations & Special Editions

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“This moment you are the most blessed people on the earth. Remembering yourself as a buddha is the most precious experience, because it is your eternity, it is your immortality. It is not you, it is your very existence. You are one with the stars and the trees and the sky and the ocean. You are no longer separate. The last word of Buddha was, sammasati.
Okay, Maneesha?
Yes, Osho.”
Osho’s last words spoken in public. The Zen Manifesto (1989). Chapter 11.

This annotated Bibliography covers all published first editions of Osho’s English discourses during his last phase in Poona Two 1987 – 1990. The bibliographic entries are listed according to the chronological sequence of the discourse series and therefore not always following the year of publishing.

Included are information and endorsements from flaps and covers, as well as quotes from Osho’s discourses at the opening of each series. From the Question/Answer sessions a few excerpts have been selected.

The books’ Introductions are often providing useful insight into the context and events during this phase of Osho’s work. Author’s various names are used in the bibliographic entries during the period of his name changes. In few cases the credentials bestowed upon the editor by Rajneesh Academy and Rajneesh International Meditation University (RIMU) in Oregon are mentioned.

For more information on later editions in English, translations, photos of covers and much more, see also www.sannyas.wiki

Talks in Chuang Tzu Auditorium

Western Mystics

* The Messiah. Commentaries by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh on Kahlil Gibran’s “The Prophet.”. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism. Volume 1 of 2. Editor: Ma Deva Sarito. Introduction: Ma Prem Maneesha. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Typing: Ma Devaprem. Proofreading: Bodhisattvaa Ma Mary Catherine, Ph.D., Arihanta. Production: Sw Prem Ramarshi, M.A. (Cantab), Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: The Rebel Publishing House GmbH, Venloer Strasse 5-7, Cologne 1, West Germany, September 1987. First edition. 496 pages. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 920 g. ISBN 3-89338-002-7. Hardcover. ISBN 3-89338-009-4. Paperback. Period: 08.01 pm – 19.01 pm. 1987. 23 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Western Mystics. Place: Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communities (Including: Khalaas Rajneesh Meditation Center, Museumsstien 8, 9990 Skagen, Denmark).
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
Distributed in the United States by Chidvilas Foundation,Inc., Boulder, Colorado. Distributed in Europe by Neo-Sannyas International, Zürich, Switzerland.
On page facing title page: In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Sw Deva Satyarthi. (Sponsor)
Binding, stitching and acidic paper of fairly poor quality. No Rebel logo on jacket.
Front flap: “Rajneesh is certainly a religious man, an intelligent human and one of those rare humans expressing himself with joy.” Paul Reps. Renowned American Writer.
“Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is the most important and most successful teacher in the domain that lies at the intersection of psychology, psychotherapy, philosophy and religion.” Guy L. Claxton, D.Phil.(Oxford). Lecturer in the Psychology of Education, University of London, U.K.
The talks are with anecdotes from Jabalpur, Rajneeshpuram, Osho’s incarceration and recent days in January 1987, Poona Two. Kahlil Gibran’s book ‘The Prophet’ is included in ‘Books I Have Loved’ (1985). All excerpts from this book are read by Vimal following his ‘Beloved Bhagwan’.

Introduction by Ma Prem Maneesha. Excerpts:
“In the early part of this century, beyond the world of the crass and the commercial, came a book which has touched the hearts of millions of people. ‘The Prophet’ by Kahlil Gibran, is an inspiring expression of one poet’s glimpses beyond the mundane into the marvellous: from his moments of insight was born Gibran’s story of the Prophet, Almustafa. Before taking leave of the world, Almustafa talks to the people of Orphalese on those subjects which have always been most dear to man – joy, sorrow and pain, work, crime and punishment, love, marriage, children, life and death…
‘The Messiah’ – a two volume commentary on ‘The Prophet’ – must find itself as a companion to Gibran’s work on the bookshelf of every lover of truth and beauty. In ‘The Messiah’, the contribution of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is much more than that of simply another poet’s perspective. For Bhagwan is not just a poet; he is not simply a mystic – one who has experienced the stuff poets’ dreams are about – he is an enlightened master. As such, he has perfected the art of communication so that it is closer to communion. And, where the poets gives us glimpses of another dimension far removed from everyday reality, the mystic brings that dimension right to our doorstep. He doesn’t say, “There is another reality that we can dream about together,” but, “You haven’t explored the reality of right here and now that you are surrounded by: that ‘other’ is within you!”…
In Bhagwan’s words, “Kahlil Gibran knows exactly what is needed, but he is absolute unaware of how to transform man. It is easy, very easy to give beautiful words to man’s essential needs. But unless you know how man can manage to fulfil his dreams, your words may be beautiful, but they carry no meaning at all. And it is not only with Kahlil Gibran, it is the case with many great poets, thinkers, philosophers. They talk as if these things are already available in the marketplace; you just go and purchase them… But these are empty words. It is good to read them, but it is nothing but entertainment. And what is needed is not entertainment; what is needed is transformation.”
This, then, is an extraordinary book – the verse of the poet, Kahlil Gibran, and the commentary of the mystic and master, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. It is a veritable mine of diamonds: I wish you the joy of exploration.
Ma Prem Maneesha S.R.N., S.R.M., R.M.N., N.M. D.Phil.M (RIMU), Acharya. Poona, India. June 1987.”

Opening discourse by Osho, ‘A Dawn Unto His Own Day’, in the first evening 08.01.1987. Excerpts:
“Kahlil Gibran… the very name brings so much ecstasy and joy that it is impossible to think of another name comparable to him. Just hearing the name, bells start ringing in the heart which do not belong to this world. Kahlil Gibran is pure music, a mystery such that only poetry can sometimes grasp it, but only sometimes.
You have chosen a man who is the most beloved of this beautiful earth. Centuries have passed; there have been great men but Kahlil Gibran is a category in himself. I cannot conceive that even in the future, there is a possibility of another man of such deep insight into the human heart, into the unknown that surrounds us.
He has done something impossible. He has been able to bring at least a few fragments of the unknown into human language. He has raised human language and human consciousness as no other man has ever done. Through Kahlil Gibran, it seems all the mystics, all the poets, all creative souls have joined hands and poured themselves.
Although he has been immensely successful in reaching people, still he feels it is not the whole truth, but just a glimpse. But to see the glimpse of truth is a beginning of a pilgrimage that leads you to the ultimate, to the absolute, to the universal.” Chapter 1, page 15.

“In one of the very important statements of Friedrich Nietzsche… and it is well to remember Friedrich Nietzsche at this moment because Kahlil Gibran was impressed by Friedrich Nietzsche more than by anybody else. In fact he wrote the book, ‘The Prophet’, under the influence of Friedrich Nietzsche’s book, ‘Thus Spake Zarathustra’.” (Chapter 15, p. 282)

* The Messiah. Commentaries by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh on Kahlil Gibran’s “The Prophet.”. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism. Volume 2 of 2. Editors: Ma Puja Melissa. Ma Prem Taranga. Introduction: Ma Prem Maneesha. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Typing: Ma Prem Arya. Ma Anand Shahida. Production: Sw Prem Pablo. Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: The Rebel Publishing House GmbH, Cologne, September 1987. First edition. 540 pages. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 990 g. ISBN 3-89338-005-5. Period: 20.01 am – 10.02 am. 1987. 24 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Western Mystics. Place: Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communities.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
Distributed in the United States by Chidvilas Foundation,Inc., Boulder, Colorado. Distributed in Europe by Neo-Sannyas International, Zürich, Switzerland.
On page facing title page: In loving gratitude to Bhagwan.
On end page: For further information contact: Neo-Sannyas International. Rennweg 34. CH-8001 Zürich. Switzerland.
Binding, stitching and acidic paper of fairly poor quality. No Rebel logo on jacket.
Front flap: “He offers the most complete, the most important and the most satisfying perspective on human life, compared to all contemporary teachers in philosophy, psychology and religion.” Dr. Lars A. Hendrikson, Professor of Psychology and Communication, Aalborg University, Denmark. (Errata: The source of this quotation was a student of philosophy at said institution)
“It is Bhagwan’s special talent that he helps one to a deeper awareness of all religious experience. I believe him to be a major force for religious consciousness in our time.” James Boughton.
With anecdotes from Jabalpur and Osho’s incarceration in the U.S.

Introduction by Ma Prem Maneesha. Excerpts:
“During the early part of 1987, in his ashram in Poona, India, Bhagwan spoke on Kahlil Gibran’s famous book, ‘The Prophet.’ This is the second of two volumes of his commentary, entitled ‘The Messiah.’
Essentially Bhagwan “uses” writings that are well known and much loved as a medium to express his own understanding of man and his relationship to life. When his experience affirms the expression of other mystics and poets, Bhagwan endorses them; and where he feels they fall short or misrepresents the truth, he does not hesitate to say so. But whether he is supporting or criticizing those of the past, Bhagwan’s love for those who have devoted their life energies to the search of truth and the expression of their findings, is evident…
The difference between Gibran and Bhagwan is the difference between the poet, with rare glimpses of insight, and the mystic, for whom such insights are simply facts of mystical life. Gibran could write: “Your daily life is your temple and your religion.” And who of us would not wish that that were so? Yet Gibran’s own life was not transformed by his vision; his reflections were not his understanding, not the realization of his own irrefutable experience, not an integral part of his being…
Bear in mind that these words are spoken extemporaneously, and that the gestures of the speaker – his movements, his voice, his eyes – all reflect the very essence of what his words attempt to convey. He is that “in-tuneness” with existence. For the mystic there are no hours spent late into the night, toiling over a typewriter in the throes of creative angst. The evening before he spoke this discourse from where this particular piece was extracted, Bhagwan had retired early to bed, as his habit, risen early the following morning, bathed, joined his disciples in the discourse auditorium – and for one and a half hours spoke on Gibran’s poetry with about as much ado as he breathed in and out the air around him.
Certainly the world needs dreamers – the artists, the poets, the sculptors, dancers and musicians. Without them, we would be spiritually impoverished. They are good – as Bhagwan might say – as far as they go, but they don’t go far enough. The mystic begins where the poet must leave off. If Gibran was the rainbow, Bhagwan is the gold at the rainbow’s end. If Gibran’s vision was a beautiful mirage, Bhagwan is an oasis. If Gibran was the call, Bhagwan is the answer.
Ma Prem Maneesha S.R.N., S.R.M., R.M.N., N.M. D.Phil.M (RIMU), Acharya. Poona, India. June 1987.”

First discourse by Osho, ‘In This Silence’, 20.01.1987 am. Opening words:
“Freedom has nothing to do with the outside world.
The true freedom is not political, is not economic; it is spiritual. Political freedom can be taken away at any moment; economic freedom can disappear just like a dewdrop in the early morning sun. They are not in your hands. And that which is not in your hands cannot be called true freedom.
True freedom is always spiritual. It has something to do with your innermost being, which cannot be chained, which cannot be handcuffed, which cannot be put into a jail.
Yes, your body can suffer all these things, but your soul is intrinsically free. You don’t have to ask for it, and you don’t have to struggle for it. It is already there, this very moment. If you turn inwards, all chains, all prisons, all kinds of slaveries disappear – and there are many. Freedom is only one; slaveries are many – just as truth is one, lies can be thousands.” (Chapter 1, p. 15)

Excerpts:
“This book, ‘The Prophet’, was written by Kahlil Gibran under the impact of Friedrich Nietzsche’s book ‘Thus Spake Zarathustra’. He was so impressed by the book that he himself tried to write a book on similar lines. Zarathhustra is not a historical figure to Nietzsche, because he knew nothing about Zarathustra, except the name, but he had chosen the right spokesman for his own philosophy.
In the same way, Kahlil Gibran has chosen Almustafa – a fictitious name – and is speaking through him. Almustafa is just a mask. The mask was needed because he is saying things which go against Christianity; but because it is only a fiction, nobody is offended. Even the popes have not listed his book on their black list, saying that no Catholic should read it. My books are on the black list – no Catholic should read them; even reading them is committing a great sin.” (Chapter 14, p. 309)
“This small book of Kahlil Gibran is far more valuable than any scripture of any religion, so don’t just read it as poetry. Read it as if it is opening doors of mysteries for you – and particularly for you, who are here, in search of something unattainable, who are here because of a dream, who are here, not out of curiosity, but with a sincere longing, an authentic desire, to become what you are supposed by nature to become…
Only then is there blissfulness; the moment you have become that which was hankering in your seed, longing in your seed to sprout and become a tree and blossom and be full of flowers and fragrance… Otherwise you cannot find blissfulness. And a man who has not found blissfulness, has not lived at all. He was born, and he died, but he never lived in between.
Unless, between your birth and your death you reach to the peak of enlightenment, you have not given respect to your own potentiality; you remained playing with toys and forgetting the real treasure.
At least my people have to be continuously alert. This is a mystery school, it is not for all and sundry, it is only for those who are ready to sacrifice everything for finding the truth of their life – because the truth of their life is higher than their life itself.
So, whatever you are doing here, just like an undercurrent there should always remain the alertness “Am I growing or not?” “Am I coming closer to my dream or not?”
It is enough that you go on coming closer and closer to the dream, it is not needed that you reach to the dream.
Just by coming closer and closer to the dream, you go on becoming your real self. The dream is only an excuse. Okay, Vimal? Yes, Bhagwan.” (Chapter 23, p. 500)

* The Rebellious Spirit. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism. Editors: Ma Prem Pankaja. Ma Puja Melissa. Sw Krishna Prabhu. Introduction: Sw Devageet. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Typing: Ma Anand Shanti. Proofreading: Boddhisattvaa Ma Mary Catherine. Production: Sw Prem Ramarshi. Sw Antar Sarlok. Typesetting: Photon Graphics Pvt. Ltd., Poona, India. Printing: Mohn-Druck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rajneesh Foundation Europe, July 1987. First edition. 325 pages. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 810 g. ISBN 3-907757-07-6. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 87-42814. 5,000 copies. Period: 10.02 pm – 25.02 am 1987. 30 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona.

In Appendix: Biography 1931 – May 21 1987. Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communities.
In colophon: Copyright: Rajneesh Foundation Europe.
Distributed in the United States by Chidvilas Foundation,Inc., Boulder, Colorado. Distributed in Europe by Neo-Sannyas International, Zürich, Switzerland.
On page facing title page: In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Sw Anand Vibhavan.
On end page: For further information contact: Neo-Sannyas International. Rennweg 34. CH-8001 Zürich. Switzerland.
No Rebel logo on jacket. Poor acidic paper quality.
The volume was the first one to be published with talks from Poona Two.
Discourses are here named sessions. The format is that each session is introduced by an excerpt from Osho’s answer to a question in the appropriate session, followed by date and time of the session. Then the question itself read by Vimal and Osho answers. Questioner’s name is mentioned by Osho.
At end of the session: “Okay, Vimal? Yes, Bhagwan.”
Front flap: “Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is an extraordinary learned, profound and widely recognized religious philosopher, teacher and spiritual leader.” Dr. Anthony J. Wiener. Professor of Management and Public Policy Polytechnic Institute of New York. Former Chairman, White House Urban Affairs Committee. Washington, D.C. U.S.A.
Back flap: “His incredible taped discourse lectures and books have inspired me (and millions of others) on the path of self evolution… His presence here is like a great bell tolling… awaken, awaken, awaken.” James Coburn. Actor.
“Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is the foremost philosopher and spiritual leader alive today.” Dr. O.A. Bushnell. Professor of Medicine. University of Hawaii, U.S.A.
The publishing house in Cologne has been named Rebel. Its logo, the letter R (for Rajneesh and Rebel) under a six-pointed star on a background of fire, was drawn by Osho and printed on the jacket of his books except the first few volumes from Poona Two. Osho’s drawing of the logo is in: Part Seven: Poona Two. Fig. 9.

Introduction by Sw Devageet. Excerpt:
“This book is compiled from questions put to Bhagwan by his disciples, and the mysterious electricity that crackles between master and disciple provides the current underlying each word. Some of the questions in this book are from me. I cannot, in truth, call them mine, because they both echo and emphasize what is happening here in Poona for many people at this time. It does mean, however, that I can speak about how the process of interaction with Bhagwan has affected me.
It needs to be understood that this temple of meditation in Poona is a mystery school; and a mystery school is not a place where one comes for information but for transformation.
Bhagwan chooses to answer authentic questions, and that means the questions are an attempt to express an existential situation which is confusing the questioner. As the words emerge from their hiding place they often come to the surface wrapped in tears and accompanied by pain, sometimes they are accompanied by laughter and relief, but always they come not from the head but the heart – more of a birth process than a thought process.
Finding expression for a deeply subjective state, private and hidden, is hazardous, and for me to expose my inner workings took a mixture of courage and simplicity. An authentic question can only find expression in an atmosphere of loving trust.
In this mysterious inner world, language is a clumsy stranger, often too insensitive to carry its fragile burden. But the master is here to help. He knows the inner world – your wounds, your tears, your fears, your terror, your hidden springs of love, of joy – and his responsiveness to your deepest needs enables the most delicate subjects to reach him intact.
Once the question goes to Bhagwan, he responds; perhaps by throwing it away, perhaps by keeping it on ice for a time, perhaps by answering it in discourse. Whatever his response, it triggers some kind of change in the questioner…
Bhagwan’s method is definitely accurate, and the gentleness of his words laid bare the path taken by the question on its journey from my depths to the light of day. As he spoke he brought clarity and healing. His surgery is of rare and wonderful kind, and though its instruments are visible, the surging sense of joy and wholeness it brings in its wake is unmistakeable proof of its effect.
The questions are only a part of Bhagwan’s multidimensional attack on our sleepiness; there is much, much more.
The Chuang Tzu Auditorium, where the discourses take place, has a circular, open design, and no walls, just pillars, so that even the birds and the trees can join in the celebration around Bhagwan. There is a new vibrancy in the air this time. We can all feel it. Life around Bhagwan has always been intense, but right now there is a new quality. I can see it shining in eyes newly soft and brimming; I can hear it in the music that we play and sing at each discourse as our hearts take flight; I can taste it in the delicious silence which dissolves five hundred people into itself twice every day as we all sit at Bhagwan’s feet.
Is it the incredible energy Bhagwan is pouring out as he dances with us, his robes shimmering, his great beard flying madly as his arms become a blur of pure rhythm? Is this his new game? He brings the whole auditorium full of people to a peak of melody and dance; then suddenly his arms lift to the sky, and everything stops! One moment there is a roaring torrent of almost blistering ecstasy; the next, a silence beyond anything.
He is giving us a glimpse of eternity, and we are getting it.
Yes, that’s the difference – right now we are actually getting it.
Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is undoubtedly an enlightened master, and the pure, smokeless flame arising from his rebellious spirit is lighting up many souls and guiding them to his table for a taste of eternity. He is serving it up in immoderate quantities.
All you need is the appetite and the thirst – the rest you can safely leave to him. Sw Devageet. Poona, India. April, 1987.” (No page number)

Excerpts:
“Beloved Bhagwan, What is Your notion of rebellion and of a rebel?
Giulia, my notion about the rebel and the rebellion is very simple: a man who does not live like a robot conditioned by the past.
Religion, society, culture… anything that is of yesterday does not in any way interfere in his way of life, in his style of life. He lives individually – not as a cog in the wheel, but as an organic unity. His life is not decided by anybody else, but by his own intelligence. The very fragrance of his life is that of freedom – not only that he lives in freedom, he allows anybody else also to live in freedom. He does not allow anybody to interfere in his life, neither does he interfere in anybody’s else’s life. To him, life is so sacred – and freedom is the ultimate value – that he can sacrifice everything for it: respectability, status, even life itself.
Freedom, to him, is what God used to be to the so-called religious people in the past. Freedom is his God.
Men have lived down the ages like sheep, as part of a crowd, following its tradition, conventions – following the old scriptures and old disciplines. But that way of life was anti-individual; if you are a Christian you cannot be an individual; if you are a Hindu, you cannot be an individual.
A rebel is one who lives totally according to his own light, and risks everything for his ultimate value of freedom. The rebel is the contemporary person. The mobs are not contemporary.” (Session 11, Question 1, p. 100)
One question is asked by Sohan and Manikbabu, who have been with Osho since 1962 in Bombay, and concerns Ajit Saraswati, a close disciple to him in Jabalpur. Ajit Saraswati and photo are to be found in Part Two: Jabalpur. (Session 9, Question 1, p. 80)
Another question is from one of those Indian sannyasin who did not have an opportunity to be with Osho during his years in Oregon. (Session 9, Question 2, p. 82)

* The Razor’s Edge. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism. Editors: Bodhisattvaa Ma Deva Barkha. Ma Shivam Suvarna. Ma Prem Gitika. Introduction: Ma Deva Aneesha. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Typing: Ma Anand Shahida. Sw Prem Atirup. Production: Sw Satyadharma. Sw Deva Anugito. Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1987 (no year). First edition. 373 pages. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 800 g. ISBN 3-89338-015-9. Period: 25.02 pm – 12.03 pm 1987. 30 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh (West Germany: Rajneesh Verlags GmbH, Cologne. Nation wide book-shop distributor VVA Vereinigte Verlagsauslieferung, Gütersloh). Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communities.
Same title as ‘The Razor’s Edge’ / Somerset Maugham (1944).
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
Distributed in the United States by Chidvilas Foundation,Inc., Boulder, Colorado. Distributed in Europe by Neo-Sannyas International, Zürich, Switzerland.
On end page: For further information contact: Neo-Sannyas International. Rennweg 34. CH-8001 Zürich. Switzerland.
Now with Rebel logo on jacket. Poor acidic paper quality.
Discourses are here named sessions. The format has each session introduced by an excerpt from Osho’s answer to a question in the appropriate session, followed by date and time of the session. Then the question read by Vimal and Osho answers. Questioner’s name is mentioned by Osho.
At the end of each session: “Okay, Vimal? Yes, Bhagwan.”
On back jacket: “Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is a man who laughs about death, delights in telling jokes, speaks on every conceivable topic, has read every major book in print, and imparts profound insights into issues at the very core of human existence. With great wit and an awesome ability to synthesize, he entertains and enlightens simultaneously. No wonder then that his words convey so much of value to us all – from philosopher to scientist, from spiritual seeker to businessman. Read and enjoy – and feel the impact of what you find in your own life.” Cari Shay, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Political Science. Western Oregon State College. Monmouth, Oregon, U.S.A.
“The unique approach and message which Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh makes available to us today is that individuality and personal growth are not a matter of ideologies – not an intellectual question – but of the courage to take one’s own responsibility, day by day. Bhagwan shows clear ways to come out of man’s misery by seeing the truth directly; by being life-affirmative, responsible, creative and joyful.” Dr. Uli Bracher, Ph.D. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe University. Frankfurt a.M. West Germany.

Introduction by Ma Deva Aneesha. Excerpt:
“For many longtime disciples the return to Poona was like returning to a childhood home – so familiar and yet somehow utterly different: different perhaps because we had grown, changed, matured. In the first Poona phase many of us had totally left our lives in the West and had come to Poona to be here ‘forever’. Suddenly, overnight, our cozy home had dissolved and with it many childhood dreams. Then in Rajneeshpuram, the new commune, we began again with a new strength and in five years set down roots which might have lasted a lifetime; but they did not. Within a tumultuous few months, five thousand disciples were thrust from their nest, young wings flapping madly – a quick lesson in life’s insistence upon change.
Bhagwan has said that life is a caravanserai – just an overnight stay, and in the morning we move on. This understanding He has given us through first-hand experience. To live as a disciple with a Master such as Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is to live on the razor’s edge; one simply never knows where the path will lead. In these pages He says: “The world of love, the world of meditation is pure insecurity; it is moving into the unknown with no maps in your hand, with no guidebook to lead you – not knowing where you are going, not knowing where you are going to land finally…”
“To be in love with a living master is always risky, dangerous… The living master is a changing phenomenon; you never knows what turn he is going to take tomorrow.”
But whereever we land with Bhagwan, we are participating in a living process, a true mystery school. Many of the discourses in this book are a window to that mysterious process that happens between master and disciple. He says, “If you can experience me, my presence, if you can open your heart with a silent welcome, it is more than one can expect – because it is not a school where you are taught philosophy, religion, psychology; it is an alchemist’s workshop where you are transformed into new beings.” With such love, such encouragement, Bhagwan urges us on into the unknown, towards that which cannot be known.
“And the time is ripe. For so many of my sannyasins, the first flowers of spring have started showing. More and more flowers will be blossoming… Words, I have given you many – that was a preparation. Seeds, I have sown many, and now that the spring is very close, you have to be courageous…” This book contains a true story, a story of the great love and immense trust between disciples and their Master as they move together along a path which is both hazardous and ecstatic – that path is the razor’s edge. With love, Ma Deva Aneesha, Poona, India, November 1987.” (No page number)

Excerpt from Session 20:
Maneesha is asking about Ouspensky’s book, ‘The Fourth Way’
“Ouspensky is a disciple of George Gudjieff and he speaks a different language than I speak. He approaches the same truth, but the concepts and the philosophy and the direction is totally different from mine. So I cannot say that he will agree with what I am saying about his statement. But whether he agrees or not, one thing is certain, that I am making his statement more significant that he himself would have been able to make it.
In Gurdjieff’s groups you will be surprised, it was really paying for everything in a very materialistic way. Gurdjieff himself has written one book, ‘All and Everything’. It is a one thousand page book and absolutely unreadable. And he himself gives the recognition to the fact that it is unreadable. Only one hundred pages are cut and open, nine hundred pages are still joined and uncut.
The book begins with a statement. The statement is, “you read first one hundred pages – it is the introduction. If you feel you can manage to understand what is being said, you can open the other pages. If you feel it is beyond you, you can return the book and take your money back.”
And how much money was he charging for that book in those days? One thousand dollars – because Gurdjieff and Ouspensky both believed that unless a person pays for something, he is not going to be deeply involved in it. When a person pays one thousand dollars, he has to read the book. And because there were nine hundred uncut pages, even people who could not understand the introduction were curious about what was inside the book; and they had already paid one thousand dollars, so it was better to cut it and see.
But the book goes on becoming more and more difficult – difficult in the sense that Gurdjieff used to make words of his own. So first you cannot find their meaning in any dictionary. These words have never existed in any language. He would mix three languages and make one word. And his words are so long that sometimes the whole sentence is one word. You cannot even pronounce it. His paragraphs are so long that one paragraph may take the whole page. By the time you come to the end of the paragraph, you have forgotten with what it had begun. Sometimes even lines run into whole pages…
I am not here to teach you the philosophy of Ouspensky or Gurdjieff, my path is totally different. Their path never crosses my path. Still, I love those people, because they created a tremendous desire for a spiritual search in the West.
Many of you might not have come here if Gurdjieff and Ouspensky had not existed. You may not have heard their names, but they created the climate for spiritual search, and I have tremendous respect for them both.
But I do not agree with them as far as the path is concerned. I have my own understanding, how you have to become awakened, enlightened.” (Session 20, p. 239)

* The Hidden Splendor. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism. Editors: Ma Deva Sarito. Ma Prem Lisa. Introduction: Ma Deva Sarito. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Typing: Ma Devaprem. Ma Dharma Pratito. Production: Sw Satyadharmaha. Sw Prem Pablo. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1987 (no year). First edition. 332 pages. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 755 g. ISBN 3-89338-019-1. Period: 12.03 pm – 26.03 am. 27 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communities.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
Distributed in the United States by Chidvilas Foundation,Inc., Boulder, Colorado. Distributed in Europe by Neo-Sannyas International, Zürich, Switzerland.
On end page: For further information contact: Neo-Sannyas International. Rennweg 34. CH-8001 Zürich. Switzerland.
Poor acidic paper quality.
Discourses are here named sessions. The format has each session introduced by an excerpt from Osho’s answer to a question in the appropriate session, followed by date and time of the session. Then the question is read by Vimal and Osho answers. Questioner’s name is mentioned by Osho-.
At the end of the session: “Okay, Vimal? Yes, Bhagwan.”

Introduction by Ma Deva Sarito. Excerpts.
“This book is not just a book, it is a journey – call it a pilgrimage if you will, a pilgrimage in search of that indefinable something that all of us, at some time or another in our lives, feel as missing. Whether we choose to pursue this missing “something” or not is another question – but all of us have felt it…
Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, who spoke these words to an audience of disciples and friends in India, is an extraordinary human being, difficult to introduce in words that the world, and particularly the Western world, understands. The East at least has a language for the phenomenon of one who is no longer “missing something,” of one who has really grown up and not just got older, of one for whom all search and questioning has disappeared into discovery. But this language of the East does not translate very well into the language of the West, which is based on science and anti-science, the material world and the world of superstition, Karl Marx and the Virgin Mary. Neither Christianity nor science has a real concept of meditation, of enlightenment. So even though you can find these words in the dictionary, you will not find their meanings there. And you will certainly not find out about Bhagwan. But the language of the East, its tradition of a spirituality which renounces the world as maya, illusion, doesn’t encompass Bhagwan either. He is a category unto himself, and you have to go to the source to be introduced. His discourses have been published in hundreds of books, each of which speaks in its own unique way to the seeker in each of us… Ma Deva Sarito. Poona, India. September, 1987.” (No page number)

Discourse excerpt:
“Nature is following a fixed routine. Consciousness is, intrinsically, freedom. So in the world of consciousness there is no regularity.
Sometimes it happens at one point of history that there are a dozen enlightened people. For example, it happened at the time of Gautam Buddha. Just at the same time there was Lao Tzu in China, and Chuang Tzu and Lieh Tzu; in Greece, there were Socrates, Pythagoras, Heraclitus, Plotinus; in India, Mahavira and eight other teachers of the same status. And perhaps in other countries… in Iran there was Zarathustra.
That was twenty-five centuries ago. Suddenly a tremendous spring came – so many enlightened people, such a cool breeze, such calmness, such consciousness. The earth was so fragrant that in India we called that age “the golden age.” Never before or after has man reached to such a peak of consciousness. And then for centuries it was just a dark night.
Then in the middle ages, again there was an explosion: Kabir, Dadu, Nanak, Farid, Mansoor, Jalaluddin Rumi, and many others in China and Japan of the same quality of enlightenment. And then again the spring did not come. There seems to be no regularity.
On the contrary, there seems to be one thing: that whenever there is one enlightened person, then many people’s consciousness is triggered. One person’s enlightenment becomes an evidence and a proof of your hidden splendor, of which you are not aware.” (Session 3, p. 34)

* Zarathustra. A God That Can Dance. Talks on Friedrich Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism. Editor: Sw Prem Agama. Sw Prabodh. Introduction: Sw Prem Nirvano. Design: The Master’s Press. Sw Deva Anugito. Typing: Ma Devaprem. Ma Dharma Pranito. Proofreading: Ma Prem Lisa. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Ma Deva Nutan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: The Rebel Publishing House GmbH, Cologne, 1987 (no year). First edition. 569 pages. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 1090 g. ISBN 3-89338-007-8. Hardcover. ISBN 3-89338-012-4. Paperback. Period: 26.03 pm – 07.04 pm. 1987. 23 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Western Mystics. Place: Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
Distributed in the United States by Chidvilas Foundation,Inc., Boulder, Colorado. Distributed in Europe by Neo-Sannyas International, Zürich, Switzerland.
Quotations from “THUS SPOKE ZARATHUSTRA” by Friedrich Niezsche translated by R.J. Hollingdale (Penguin Classics, 1961, 1969), Copyright R.L. Hollingdale 1961, 1969. Reproduced by permission of Penguin Books Ltd.
On page facing title page: In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Zorba the Buddha Rajneesh Discoteques. Cologne Stuttgart Hanover. (Sponsor)
On end page: For further information contact: Rajneeshdham. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411001. India.
Binding and stitching of rather poor quality. No Rebel logo on jacket.
On front flap: “What a joy, what a delight! to discover ‘Thus Spoke Zarathustra’ coming alive in the discourses of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. With refreshing wit and clarity this Master takes Nietzsche out of the dusty covers of academic analysis, extracting the essence of his work, illuminating the relevance of Zarathustra for anyone seeking the god within now – a god that can truly dance.” Count Christoph Keyserlingk.
The date of discourses are not mentioned.

Introduction by Sw Prem Nirvano. Excerpt:
“But suddenly in our midst appeared this latest of latecomers, this upstart Zarathustra, this anthem/new mystic whom nobody knew much of nor quite understood. It wasn’t even sure that such a man had existed, so little of him was known.
He had made an European appearance as “Zoroaster” in the secret rites of the Lodges of the Freemasons and as “Zarastro” in Mozart’s opera, The Magic Flute; and the followers of Zarathustra – the Parsees – who survive still, in Bombay, look to their holy scripture, the ‘Avesta’, for inspiration from their Zarathustra. But he bears little resemblance to the mystic introduced to us through Bhagwan.
Bhagwan finally solved the riddle one evening when he said in discourse: “It is a very complicated affair. I was not speaking directly on Zarathustra, I was speaking on the Zarathustra who is an invention of Friedrich Nietzsche. All the great insights are given by Nietzsche to Zarathustra. Zarathustra – many times his original books have been brought to me, and they are so ordinary that I have never spoken on them. Nietzsche has used Zarathustra only as a symbolic figure, just as Khalil Gibran was using Almustafa – who was completely fictitious. Nietzsche had used a historical name but in a very fictitious way.
So first, it is Nietzsche’s Zarathustra, you should remember; it has nothing to do with the original Zarathustra.
And secondly, when I am speaking on it, I don’t care what Nietzsche means – and I don’t even have any way to know what he means. The way he used Zarathustra, I am using him! So it is a very complicated story. It is my Nietzsche, and Nietzsche is my Zarathustra. So what heights you are flying in has nothing to do with Zarathustra.” (The Golden Future).
Zarathustra, through Bhagwan’s eyes, is first and foremost a human being himself: one who can laugh and shed tears just as the rest of us, one who can experience terror and exuberance, pride and sharing, weakness and strength. He speaks to us man-to-man, leaving it utterly up to us whether we agree or disagree, whether we want to befriend him or go our own way. And what he teaches, he teaches as a friend, sorting through the ins and outs of the path of truth, giving each step and aspect thorough and single-pointed attention.
Each of Bhagwan’s discourses thus becomes a lesson on a very specific theme, and each theme is a step deeper into the journey. So “a god that can dance” is born – a man that becomes a god, a man who dares to shed all bondages of false virtues and values, who dares to dance in earthly innocence and overflowing joy, singing his “sacred yes” to life itself. Sw Prem Nirvano. Poona, India. April 1987.” (No page number)

First discourse by Osho, Prologue Part 1, 26.03.1987 pm. Opening words:
“Friedrich Nietzsche is perhaps the greatest philosopher the world has known. He is also great in another dimension which many philosophers are simply unaware of: he is a born mystic.
His philosophy is not only of the mind but is rooted deep in the heart, and some roots even reach to his very being. The only thing unfortunate about him is, that he was born in the West; hence, he could never come across any mystery school. He contemplated deeply, but he was absolutely unaware about meditation. His thoughts sometimes have the depth of a meditator, sometimes the flight of a Gautam Buddha; but these things seem to have happened spontaneously to him.
He knew nothing about the ways of enlightenment, about the path that reaches to one’s own being. This created a tremendous turmoil in his being. His dreams go as high as the stars but his life remained very ordinary – it does not have the aura that meditation creates. His thoughts are not his blood, his bones, his marrow. They are beautiful, immensely beautiful, but something is missing; and what is missing is life itself. They are dead words; they don’t breathe – there is no heartbeat.
But I have chosen to speak on him for a special reason; he is the only philosopher, from East or West, who has at least thought of the heights of the human consciousness. He may not have experienced them; he certainly has not experienced them. He also thought of becoming a man again. That idea, of descending from your heights into the marketplace, descending from the stars to the earth, has never happened to anybody else.” (p. 4)

* Zarathustra. The Laughing Prophet. Talks on Friedrich Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism. Editor: Ma Shivam Suvarna. Ma Anand Shanti. Introduction: Sw Devageet B.D.S., M.M., D.Phil.M (RIMU), Acharya. Design: The Master’s Press. Sw Deva Anugito. Typing: Ma Prem Arya. Ma Anand Shahida. Proofreading: Ma Prem Lisa. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Ma Deva Nutan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: The Rebel Publishing House GmbH, Cologne, 1987 (no year). First edition. 570 pages. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 1070 g. ISBN 3-89338-008-6. Hardcover. ISBN 3-89338-013-2. Paperback. Period: 08.04 am – 19.04 am 1987. 23 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Western Mystics. Place: Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona.

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
Distributed in the United States by Chidvilas Foundation,Inc., Boulder, Colorado. Distributed in Europe by Neo-Sannyas International, Zürich, Switzerland.
Quotations from “THUS SPOKE ZARATHUSTRA” by Friedrich Niezsche translated by R.J. Hollingdale (Penguin Classics, 1961, 1969), Copyright R.L. Hollingdale 1961, 1969. Reproduced by permission of Penguin Books Ltd.
On page facing title page: In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Zorba the Buddha Rajneesh Discoteques. Cologne Stuttgart Hanover. (Sponsor)
On end page: For further information contact: Rajneeshdham. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411001. India.
Binding and stitching of rather poor quality. No Rebel logo on jacket.
On front flap: “Ever since the second world war the name of Friedrich Nietzsche has been anathema, particularly to Germans, who blame him for Hitler’s horrific program. Since then no one has dared to look closely and see how Hitler consciously warped his words and perverted his intentions.
Now in this book, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh takes Nietzsche’s book “Thus Spoke Zarathustra,” and rescues him from the blight of history, restoring his innocence and turning this great work into a celebration feast that we can all enjoy and appreciate.” Oscar Mann, B.Sc., M.I.A. United Nations Project Officer, Kenya Director Environment Liaison Center, Kenya. Consultant to United Nations, Agency for International Development, World Bank.

Introduction by Sw Devageet. Excerpt:
“Friedrich Nietzsche was a serious and dedicated philosopher – serious about his work, and dedicated to the truth. He was a man of tremendous visionary insight – capable of prodigious jumps, not only beyond the accepted but even beyond the acceptable limits of his day. His courage matched his intellect, and he has changed the shape of man’s conceptual horizons.
Had Nietzsche been born in the East, particularly in India, he might have become enlightened. But the West has never quite understood that consciousness can transcend mind. When mind has delved so deeply, has encountered the known, jumped into the unknown, and finally come face to face with the unknowable, it can go no further. At this point human consciousness can either transcend the mind, or else it can fall below mind, into madness. Nietzsche had the capacity to become enlightened, but he lacked the vital ingredient to make it possible – a living, enlightened master to guide him into the beyond.
In his creative genius, Nietzsche sought out a great master from the past, Zarathustra, and wrote of him in a way which enabled him to project all his longing, his vision, all his yearning to break out of what had become an intolerable prison. Nietzsche gave new life to long-dead and dusty Zarathustra… or was it that Zarathustra reached across the eons of time and gave new hope to Nietzsche? Be that as it may, the story now has taken a new and unexpected quantum leap. Although Nietzsche is dead, and died without having found a master himself, his creation called Zarathustra did find a living enlightened master – Bhagwan.
Now the circle is complete: in this book Bhagwan, a living master, is commenting on the fictional “Zarathustra,” using the clarity of his own enlightened vision to indicate where Nietzsche’s vision came close to the truth and where it fell short.
A deep belly-laughter must be echoing through existence at the magnificent completion of a vast circle which has transcended both time and space. Zarathustra danced and showered his love on people thousand of years ago. Today Bhagwan is doing the same, only more. We have no record of Zarathustra’s jokes, his bubbling humor, his living presence. But in Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, existence is at its most vibrant, its most exquisite, its most graceful. Yes, all this is true – and there is also a quality of delicious mischief which makes me think that even Zarathustra could learn a thing or two from Bhagwan. Perhaps it is for this very reason that Zarathustra has taken so much trouble to bring himself to Bhagwan’s attention.
Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, an enlightened master from the East, meets Nietzsche, the serious, mystical visionary from Germany. In these pages Bhagwan dissolves Nietzsche’s seriousness into his own inexhaustible joy, transforming Zarathustra into a laughing prophet. Perhaps this could have been Nietzsche’s own destiny had he had the good fortune to meet Bhagwan himself. Sw Devageet B.D.S., M.M., D.Phil.M.(RIMU), Acharya. July, 1987 Poona India.” (No page number)

First discourse by Osho, ‘Of the Famous Philosophers’, 08.04.1987 am. Opening words:
“Zarathustra is not a philosopher. Philosophy to him is sheer wastage of time – not only of yours but of other’s too – because philosophy is nothing but a mind game. It is not the way to find the truth, it is not the way to find love, it is not the way to find beauty; it only goes on making systems of empty words.
But they have deceived millions. And they have prevented millions from going in search to find the key to the mysteries of life. Philosophy has never transformed anyone. It gives people swollen heads, but it does not bring a revolution in their life; no metamorphosis happens through it. It is the greatest deception that man has been giving to himself and to others. It has given beautiful words for people to play with. It has treated people like children; and those who have remained playing with those words have remained children, retarded.” (p. 5)

* The Golden Future. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism. Editors: Bodhisattvaa Ma Deva Nisango. Siddha Ma Prem Taranga. Introduction: Sw Anand Somen. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Typing: Sw Antar Ansula. Sw Dhyan Sharan. Production: Sw Deva Anugito. Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1988 (no year). First edition. 414 pages. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 900 g. ISBN 3-89338-017-5. Period: 19.04 pm – 31.05 pm 1987. 40 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. (USA: Also available in nationwide bookstores of Walden Books and B. Daltons). Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
Distributed in the United States by Chidvilas Foundation,Inc., Boulder, Colorado. Distributed in Europe by Neo-Sannyas International, Zürich, Switzerland.
In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Sw Anand Vibhavan. (Sponsor)
On end page: For further information contact: Rajneeshdham. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411001. India.
Rather poor paper quality.
The discourses are named sessions. The format has each session introduced by an excerpt from Osho’s answer to a question in the appropriate session, followed by date and time of the session. The questions are now read by Maneesha and Osho answers. Questioner’s name is mentioned by Osho in his answer. In this series ten questions were asked by Maneesha herself, some of them on Osho’s concept for communal living.
At the end of the session: “Okay, Maneesha? Yes, Bhagwan.”
On back jacket: “We live in very anxious and maddening times; nuclear destruction is possible. I see the whole movement Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh symbolizes as a sane and important event of our time.” David Eckroth. Associate Professor of Architecture. Texas A & M University. U.S.A.
“Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh offers both a seer’s vision and a brilliantly constructive blueprint for a new man and a new world. His wisdom is both strikingly individual and wholly universal, and with his inimitable style of humor, Bhagwan shows clearly and uncompromisingly the dangers, challenges, and unique opportunities which face humanity at this crucial time in history.” Margaret R. Heyer. B.Sc., M.A., M.F.C.C.

Introduction by Sw Anand Somen. Excerpts:
“When I first picked up a book by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh it was as though a shaft of sunlight had illuminated my darkness. My life had been at the crossroads and the past seemed to have lost all significance. The potent question “What’s it all about?” had taken possession of me; answers from any normal source no longer satisfied. Suddenly through Bhagwan’s words, meaning flashed into my life and all the hypocrisy, hatred and violence of the surrounding world was put in perspective. All at once I knew that my childhood hope for a better tomorrow, a Golden Future, was possible.
If Bhagwan’s words touch you the way they touched me, then you are in for a treat like you’ve never had before. Bells will ring in your heart; you knew it all before but somehow you just couldn’t say it. Little explosions of some hitherto unknown energy will rip through you and you’ll feel like shouting out in joy – finally you’ve found something real, someone who knows what’s all about, who shares your hope for a shining tomorrow. You are off on a sleigh ride of delight, and it’s too late to stop…
Walking through the gate into Bhagwan’s ashram here in Poona, the very air seems to be of a different quality. This is the subtle energy field of a living buddha surrounded by thousand of seekers pouring their totalities into meditation and their quest for the unknown.
If this rare phenomenon can spread beyond these gates to engulf the world, man will be transformed totally and Bhagwan’s vision, instead of an impossible dream will become a reality. By opening the pages of this book you have embarked on a journey of discovery into the unknown world of the inexpressible. Read on and discover your pathway towards a Golden Future. Sw Anand Somen. September, 1987. Poona.” (No page number)

Session 1, ‘The Language of the Golden Future’, 19.04.1987 pm. First question about silence asked by Maneesha and excerpt from Osho’s answer:
“Anand Somen, silence is usually understood to be something negative, something empty, an absence of sound, of noises. This misunderstanding is prevalent because very few people have ever experienced silence. All that they have experienced in the name of silence is noiselessness. But silence is a totally different phenomenon. It is utterly positive. it is existential, it is not empty. It is overflowing with a music that you have never heard before, with a fragrance that is unfamiliar to you, with a light that can only be seen by the inner eyes. It is not something fictitious; it is a reality; and a reality which is already present in everyone – just we never look in. All our senses are extrovert. Our eyes open outside, our ears open outside, our hands move outside, our legs… all our senses are meant to explore the outside world.
But there is a sixth sense also, which is asleep because we have never used it. And no society, no culture, no educational system helps people to make the sixth sense active. That sixth sense, in the East, is called “the third eye.” It looks inwards. And just as there is a way of looking in, so there is a way of hearing in, so there is a way of smelling in. Just as there are five senses moving outward, there are five counter-senses moving inward. In all, man has ten senses, but the first sense that starts the inner journey is the third eye, and then other senses start opening up.
Your inner world has its own taste, has its own fragrance, has its own light. And it is utterly silent, immensely silent, externally silent. There has never been any noise, and there will never be any noise. No word can reach there, but you can reach. The mind cannot reach there but you can reach because you are not the mind. The function of the mind is again to be a bridge between you and the objective world, and the function of the heart is to be a bridge between you and yourself.
The silence that I have been talking about is the silence of the heart. It is a song in itself, without words and without sounds. It is only out of this silence that the flowers of love grow. It is this silence that becomes the garden of Eden. Meditation, and only meditation, is the key to open the doors of your own being.” (pp. 2-3)

* The Rebel. Talks given to the Osho Commune International in Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona, India. June 1-18, 1987. Editor: Mahasattvaa Sw Geet Govind. Introduction: Sw Prem Indivar. Design: Ma Puja Abhar. Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: The Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1990 (no year). First edition. 349 pages. Front endpaper photography by Sw Premgit. Back endpaper painting by Sw Anutosh Ninad. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19,4 cm. Weight: 689 g. ISBN: 3-89338-021-3. Period: 01.06 am – 18.06 am 1987. 35 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona. [Copy: LC. Acc: 26.09.1997] (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Osho. English Language Editions. Osho Publishers. Other Publishers. Books about Osho. Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho. Osho Meditation Centers and Communes. For further Information contact Osho Commune International. 17, Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
To Osho in loving gratitude Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
Framed information on name change to Osho.
Discourses are here named sessions. The format has each session introduced by an excerpt from Osho’s answer to a question in the appropriate session. Then follows the question read by Maneesha and Osho’s answer. Questioner’s name is mentioned by Osho.
At the end of the session: “Okay, Maneesha? Yes, Beloved Master.”
Introduction by Sw Prem Indivar. Excerpts:
“In intense question-and-answer sessions with His disciples – many of whom have been with Him for years – the Master is ruthless in penetrating to the very core of our so-called problems and dissolving the questions. Over and over again He puts our questions into proper perspective.
Meditation is not just His top priority, it is His only priority; it is the only thing that can help now. He makes it clear that He simply answers our trivial questions about relationships and personal problems, to clear the way for meditation. And He warns us not to even ask Him questions if we are not prepared to hear His answers – which are bound to hurt – because He cannot lie or even tone down the truth to console us…
This rebel is a man who has freed himself from the chains of the past (the old man) and who is in contact with a new way in himself. The new man is courageous enough to put this vision into action now. Osho’s way is the way of the new rebel; He inspires us without telling us what to do – and He points out the way, which is never outside of us, always within. For example, when He speaks of revolution, it is always of the inner – the outer, political revolution is a futile effort:
“The rebel… brings into the world a change of consciousness; and if the consciousness changes, then the structure of the society is bound to follow it. But vice versa is not right – and it has been proved by all the revolutions, because they have all failed.”
Reading ‘The Rebel’ requires a certain nonjudgemental attentiveness. Much of it seems so controversial at first glance that if you don’t drop your mind and just let it in, you’ll find yourself in a continuous argument with it. Reading this books with an open heart and just hearing these amazing simple teachings is bound to change you in ways you never expected. It is a great adventure in consciousness, a safari into the wild unknown. Swami Prem Indivar Poona, India August 1989.” (No page number)

Session 2, ‘Beyond the Capacity of the Mind’, 01.06.1987 pm. Third question asked by Maneesha and excerpts from Osho’s answer:
“Beloved Master, The silences between Your words are becoming more and more nourishing to me. Often when a word comes after a gap of silence, I am surprised and I wonder how it is that, with Your being in such silence, You are able to speak so articulately – it seems like it would require such tremendous effort. Would You please say something about the relationship between enlightenment and language?
Puja Melissa, I am just a storyteller. From my very childhood I have loved to tell stories, real, unreal. I was not at all aware that this telling of stories would give me an articulateness, and that it would be of tremendous help after enlightenment.
Many people become enlightened, but not all of them become masters – for the simple reason that they are not articulate, they cannot convey what they feel, they cannot communicate what they have experienced. Now it was just accidental with me, and I think it must have been accidental with those few people who became masters, because there is no training course for it. And I can say it with certainty only about myself.
When enlightenment came, I could not speak for seven days; the silence was so profound that even the idea of saying anything about it did not arise. But after seven days, slowly, as I became accustomed to the silence, to the beatitude, to the bliss, the desire to share it – a great longing to share it with those whom I lived was very natural…
Just here in this city a few years ago was a man, Meher Baba. He lived more than thirty years in silence. He was announcing every year that he would be speaking. The date would come, his disciples would gather, they would come from faraway lands – and again he would not speak. He could not manage a connection between silence and language…
So most of my time was spent in the libraries, not in the classes. It was just accidental that I became acquainted with the subtle nuances of words, their beauty, their poetry; so when enlightenment overwhelmed me, slowly slowly I was able to at least give some indication of the beyond. But it was purely an accident…
Enlightenment can come to anybody at any age, but you will have to use your mind to communicate it, and that mind will be the old mind. If it is articulate in something, then that will become your expression. Haridas, a great musician and a master, never spoke about his enlightenment but only sang songs – songs of tremendous beauty played on his sitar; and just his music conveyed something of his inner music.
Enlightenment is unrelated with anything, and after enlightenment it is very difficult – almost impossible – to train your mind. Mind becomes such a faraway reality, and you are on the sunlit peaks of a mountain. The distance is so much that unless the mind is already trained in something, there is no way other than to remain silent.
Most of the mystics have not spoken – not a single word – although a few very sensitive souls became aware that something great has happened to them. People started sitting by their side, at their feet, just to be showered by their presence. It has been found to be tremendously blissful, but only for a very few, because the language of silence and the language of presence is not understood by many.
Okay, Maneesha?
Yes, Beloved Master.”

* The New Dawn. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona, India. Editors: Ma Shivam Suvarna. Ma Anand Anupam. Introduction: Ma Shivam Suvarna. Design: Sw Dhyan Suryam. Sw Shivananda. Typing: Ma Paripurna. Ma Veetmana. Typesetting: Ma Premo. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Sw Paritosho. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 422 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 825 g. ISBN 3-89338-023-X. Period: 18.06 pm – 04.07 pm 1987. 33 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes: No listing of locations, but text: “There are many Rajneesh Meditation Centers throughout the world which can be contacted for information about the teachings of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and which have His books available as well as audio and video tapes of His discourses. Centers exist in practically every country.” For further information contact: Rajneeshdham. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
On title page: In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
Change of design with b&w photos of Osho and back cover painting by Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto), B.F.A. (Musashino Art University, Tokyo)
Discourses are here named sessions. The format has each session introduced by an excerpt from Osho’s answer to a question in the appropriate session. Then follows the question read by Maneesha and Osho’s answer. Questioner’s name is mentioned by Osho.
At the end of the session: “Okay, Maneesha? Yes, Bhagwan.”

Introduction by Ma Shivam Suvarna. Excerpts:
“This book is full of the real stories and true-life dilemmas of those who are working towards more consciousness, struggling for an authentic life – and the patient, sparklingly clear responses from one who is awakened. The questions cover an immense range of experiences, from one woman’s “loopy energy” to the “language of enlightenment,” from questions about the role of journalism to the intricacies of relationship. And Bhagwan has said that when He answers one person, He answers everybody; if it is not your question today, it may be tomorrow.
Bhagwan speaks about the New Dawn: a complete break from the past which has led us to our present situation – a world perched on the edge of ecological and nuclear disaster, a population of unhappy, frustrated people – and the beginnings of a New Man who is loving, alive, nonserious, respectful of this earth; who possesses all those qualities that everyone, consciously or unconsciously, desires…
Around this illuminated being of Bhagwan, small flames are tentatively flickering. In these pages you may catch the flame, you may get a glimpse of your own New Dawn. Ma Shivam Suvarna, B.Sc.” (No page number)

Session 1, ‘Life is Such a Puzzling Affair’, 18.06.1987 pm. First question asked by Maneesha and excerpt from Osho’s answer:
“Beloved Bhagwan, I have tried, and cannot find the words that adequately convey the beauty of those moments when You enter the auditorium. I see the heads of my beloved friends bend down: their love and reverence for You is so poignant, and touches me so deeply. And when Your eyes fall on mine, I feel as if I am drinking from a chalice full of golden light. This connection between You and us, Your devotees, this is the real “holy communion,” isn’t it”
“Yes, this is the holy communion, where the egos disappear in a great flood of love, where small minds are left far behind, and you are flying like eagles across the sun, in the infinity of the sky – where you are not bound by your bodies, by your minds; where suddenly, you have become a freedom, a spirit. And if there are many people together in the same space it certainly deepens the mystery, the glory, the magnificence. Yes, Maneesha, this is what I call “holy communion.”
I am not.
I have not been there for a long time.
In certain moments, you join me, and you are also no more. In this silence, in this nothingness, where neither I am nor you are, but only a silence prevails – this is the “holy communion.” This is the greatest beatitude, the highest benediction.
This is the door to the divine. This is the door invisible to the eyes, but perfectly visible to the inner being.
Those who enter this door are no more Hindus, no more Christians, no more Buddhists. They are simply pure spirits, just innocent beings – with a fragrance they have never known, which surrounds them with a light that dispels all darkness… with a music which is without any sound, and a feeling of dance, although there is not any movements. This is the great secret of being religious.” (Session 1, pp. 2,4)

Zen Masters Bodhidharma and Ta Hui

* Bodhidharma. The Greatest Zen Master. Commentaries on the Teachings of the Messenger of Zen from India to China. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona, India. Subtitle on front cover: The Greatest Zen Master. Subtitle on title page: Commentaries on the Teachings of the Messenger of Zen from India to China. Editors: Ma Prem Gitika. Ma Deva Sarito. Introduction: Sw Deva Rashid. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Calligraphy: Ma Deva Satyama. Typing: Ma Prem Praveeta. Production: Ma Prem Arya. Typesetting: Photon Graphics Pvt. Ltd., Poona, India. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1988 (no year). First edition. 392 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 775 g. ISBN 3-89338-025-6. Period: 05.07 am – 14.07 pm 1987. 20 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Zen and Zen masters. Place: Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona.

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh: “Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh are available AT COST PRICE in many languages throughout the world. Bhagwan’s discourses have been recorded live on audiotape and videotape. There are many recordings of Rajneesh meditation music and celebration music played in His presence, as well as beautiful photographs of Bhagwan. For further information contact one of the distribution centers listed on the next page.”
Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers. No listing of locations, but text: “There are many Rajneesh Meditation Centers throughout the world which can be contacted for information about the teachings of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and which have His books available as well as audio and video tapes of His discourses. Centers exist in practically every country.”
For further information about Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
Quotations from ‘The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma’ (complete version available in a bilingual, Chinese-English, edition from Empty Bowl. P.O. Box 646, Port Townsend, WA 98368, USA). Translation by Red Pine. Copyright: Red Pine 1987. Reproduced by permission.
Distributed in the U.S.A. by Chidvilas, Boulder, Colorado. Distributed in Europe by The Rebel Publishing House GmbH, Cologne, West Germany.
In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Sw Anand Vibhavan. (Sponsor)
Designed with calligraphy vignettes. Table of Contents and Appendix (ix-xxii) run transversely across pages.
On back flap: “Why use a Rajneesh book to study Zen Buddhism in comparative religion courses? Because students have found them the most helpful to understand the religious life of Zen people. Textbooks on Zen history often seem to lack ‘Zen-spirit’. And, while books full of unexplained Zen stories may have Zen-spirit, they leave students bemused and mystified, not to say baffled.
“Rajneesh books on Zen avoid both these pitfalls. They definitely have Zen-spirit and they explain the stories line-by-line so that you feel you understand much of what is happening in dialogues between Zen masters and disciples. You can feel Zen’s flavor, sense its significance and glimpse its intentionality. That Zen masters use Rajneesh’s books to teach Zen in Japan says much about their ability to tap into the heart of this tradition.” Dr. Robert Erwin Gussner. Assistant Professor of Comparative Religion, University of Vermont, U.S.A.

Introduction by Sw Deva Rashid. Excerpts:
“Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is talking to his disciples explaining and expanding into twentieth century language the insights that Bodhidharma communicated in the sixth century to his disciples.
Bodhidharma is one of the giants of the Buddha’s inheritance. Bhagwan is a seer who spans all traditions and all times. A book of two such men, in dialogue as it were, is a survival handbook of a new dimension…
As the discourses unfold we begin to glimpse Bhagwan’s penetrating insights into the normal aberrations of human behavior…
In the splendor of these totally unscripted discourses Bhagwan goes on to unravel the thread that leads to the natural man, the true man, the new man for this age.
“The greatest delusion, according to those who have reached the highest peak of awareness, is searching and seeking outside of yourself.”
“In meditation, dhyan, mind simply disappears. Dhyan is a silence beyond mind.”
In that silence is the source of all true action and all true non-action: the spider’s weaving of her web and the spider’s stillness.” (p. vii)

First discourse in this series, ‘To Seek Nothing is Bliss’, on Bodhidharma’s Outline of Practice, 05.07.1987 am. Opening words:
“I have a very soft corner in my heart for Bodhidharma. That makes it a very special occasion to speak about him. Perhaps he is the only man whom I have loved so deeply that speaking on him will be almost speaking on myself. That also creates a great complexity, because he never wrote anything in his life. No enlightened being has ever written. Bodhidharma is not an exception, but by tradition these three books that we are going to discuss are attributed to Bodhidharma.
The scholars reason that because there is no contrary evidence – and for almost one thousand years these books have been attributed to Bodhidharma – there is no reason why we should not accept them. I am not a scholar, and there are certainly fragments which must have been spoken by Bodhidharma, but these are not books written by him. These are notes by his disciples. It was an ancient tradition that when a disciple takes notes from the master he does not put his own name on those notes, because nothing of it belongs to him; it has come from the master.
But knowing Bodhidharma as intimately as I know him… There are so many fallacies which are possible only if somebody else was taking notes and his own mind entered into it; he has interpreted Bodhidharma – and with not much understanding.
Before we enter into these sutras, a few things about Bodhidharma will be good to know. That will give you the flavor of the man and a way to understand what belongs to him in these books and what does not belong to him. It is going to be a very strange commentary.
Bodhidharma was born fourteen centuries ago as a son of a king in the south of India. There was a big empire, the empire of Pallavas. He was the third son of his father, but seeing everything – he was a man of tremendous intelligence – he renounced the kingdom.
He was not against the world, but he was not ready to waste his time in mundane affairs, in trivia. His whole concern was to know his self-nature, because without knowing it you have to accept death as the end.” (p. 5)

* Ta Hui. The Great Zen Master. Reflections on the Transformation of an Intellectual to Enlightenment. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona, India. Editors: Ma Anand Shanti. Sw Krishna Prabhu. Ma Deva Amalin. Introduction: Ma Prem Taranga. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Calligraphy: Ma Dhyan Anusati. Sw Bhaven. Typing: Ma Anand Anupam. Sw Prem Arpan. Production: Ma Prem Arya. Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1988 (no year). First edition. 529 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 990 g. ISBN 3-89338-027-2. Period: 15.07 am – 20.08 pm 1987. 38 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Zen and Zen masters. Place: Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh: “Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh are available AT COST PRICE in many languages throughout the world. Bhagwan’s discourses have been recorded live on audiotape and videotape. There are many recordings of Rajneesh meditation music and celebration music played in His presence, as well as beautiful photographs of Bhagwan. For further information contact one of the distribution centers listed below.”
Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers. No listing of locations, but text: “There are many Rajneesh Meditation Centers throughout the world which can be contacted for information about the teachings of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and which have His books available as well as audio and video tapes of His discourses. Centers exist in practically every country.”
For further information about Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
Dedicated to Sw Anand Maitreya, another intellectual, who became enlightened on June 11, 1984 and moved into eternal sleep on July 17, 1987.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
Quotations from ‘Swamplan Flowers. The Letters and Lectures of Zen Master Ta Hui’. Translation by Christopher Cleary. Copyright Grove Press and Christopher Cleary. Reproduced by permission.
Distributed in the U.S.A. by Chidvilas, Boulder, Colorado. Distributed in Europe by The Rebel Publishing House GmbH, Cologne, West Germany.
In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Sw Anand Vibhavan. (Sponsor)
No numbering of chapters in Contents.
Designed with calligraphy vignettes. On pp. 163-165 are six b&w photos of Osho tearing apart his note paper with the sutra because Ta Hui has called Buddha ‘the old barbarian’.
On back jacket: “A time-honored goal of comparative religion studies since the time of Joachim Wach has been ‘Verstehen’ – to understand a religious item in another culture, and the larger culture of which it is a part, so fully that insiders see themselves reflected in what you say about them. To give such an emphathetic account of another religion, a book must make the central concerns of insiders central and their more marginal concerns peripheral. The central concerns of Asian mystical traditions stem from meditation and spiritual experience. To present these accurately requires the touch of one at home in such experience. I find students feel they understand more of Asian religious life if I supplement scholarly books with one of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh’s commentaries on some text. He connects faraway times and places with present existential concerns and the universal themes of suffering, the inner life and human fulfilment.” Dr. Robert Erwin Gussner. Assistant Professor of Comparative Religion, University of Vermont, U.S.A.

Introduction by Ma Prem Taranga. Excerpts:
“To return to this book: it is a small miracle. Each discourse is in itself a gem, but as a collection it becomes priceless, for it shows Ta Hui’s journey from knowledge to knowing, from mind to no-mind, and indeed from teacher to master – a journey which will encourage any seeker.
The story has a happy ending in Ta Hui’s enlightenment, but along the way he falls into many traps. An outstanding bright young monk, he is hailed as a great teacher for his apparent understanding and articulate rendering of the words of past masters. Thus seduced by the praise of others, Ta Hui falls into the deep pit of self-deception, and the dishonesty that is the inevitable companion of the effort to maintain a false image.
Bhagwan shows clearly how Ta Hui misunderstands and misinterprets the sutras of Buddha and other masters, because he speaks merely from his acquaintance with their words and not from his own experience…
A highlight of these talks for me were the Zen stories. By giving us the context of Zen, its focus on emptiness, its methods of meditating on an insoluble koan, and then vividly setting the scene of each episode, each dialogue, Bhagwan brought to life the whole amazing feeling of master and disciple and set in stark simplicity the focus on enlightenment, on the experience happening, be it through a finger-snap, a shout, or being thrown out of the window! The stories became so vital, so poignant, the compassionate perceptivity of the master and the response of the disciple so moving – the exquisite subtlety of Zen coming to us HERENOW…
Come taste this presence, this oceanic consciousness, this supreme silence. If the words touch a longing in your heart, do not doubt… the master who uttered them is here for you too. If you are thirsty, don’t hesitate: come and share.” Ma Prem Taranga. Poona, India. December, 1987. (pp. x-xi)

Prologue from the ‘Blue Cliff Record’ of Ta Hui’s teacher, Yuan Wu. Excerpt:
“It was eleven sixty-three, on the ninth day of the eight month, after showing signs of illness, when Ta Hui told the congregation of monks, nuns, and lay-people, “Tomorrow I’m going.” Towards the pre-dawn hours, his attendant asked Ta Hui for a verse. In a serious voice Ta Hui said, “Without a verse, I couldn’t die.” He took up the brush and wrote: Birth is thus / Death is thus / Verse or no verse / What’s the fuss? Then he let go of the writing brush and passed on.” (p. xiii)

First discourse in this series, ‘Clear the Mind (To Li Hsien-Ch’en) and Mindlessness (To Hung Po-Ch’ang)’, 15.07.1987 am. Opening words:
“The great Zen teacher Ta Hui comes from the same lineage as Bodhidharma. He was born four hundred years after Bodhidharma had left for the Himalayas, to disappear into the eternal ice, the eternal silence there.
I have called Ta Hui the great Zen teacher – not a master… it has to be explained to you clearly. The master is one who is enlightened. But sometimes it happens that the master may be enlightened, but is not articulate enough to give expression to what he has known. That is a totally different art.
The teacher is not enlightened, but he is very articulate. He can say things which the master, although he knows, cannot bring to words.
The teacher can say them, although he does not know.
The teacher he has heard… he has lived with enlightened people, he has imbibed their energy, he has been showered by their flowers. He has tasted something transpiring from the enlightened ones, so he has a certainty that something like enlightenment happens, but he has no authority of his own; his authority is borrowed. And if the teacher is a genius, he can almost manage to express things over which masters have faltered, or they have remained silent.
The teacher has his own utility. He is more available to the people – he belongs to the people. The master is on a high sunlit peak. Even if he shouts from there, only echoes reach to the people’s ears. But the teacher lives amongst the people, knows their life, knows their language, knows how things should be expressed so they can understand. The master remains committed to his experience, while the teacher is more committed to the people, to spread the message.
Once in a while it happens that the master cannot express at all. For example, Ramakrishna was an enlightened man, but utterly uneducated, uncultured, knowing nothing of great literature, knowing nothing of what other enlightened people have said. He experienced the beauty of his inner being, but he was absolutely handicapped as far as conveying it to others. He had to take the support of a man, Vivekananda, who was not enlightened but was a great genius – very intelligent, rational, logical, intellectual, well-versed, well-educated. He became the mouthpiece of Ramakrishna. He went around the world spreading his message.
Whatever exists today as Ramakrishna Mission, is completely the work of Vivekananda, but he himself died in utter agony. The agony was more intense because he had been spreading the good news of ecstasy, but inside he was empty. His whole message was only verbal, but he managed it so cleverly that many started thinking of him as enlightened.
The same thing happened with Ta Hui. When he was just sixteen years old he was so intelligent… he left the world, and after one year of preparation he was initiated as a monk, when he was just seventeen. Then he went from master to master, seeking the right enlightened man who could show him the way.
He found his master in Yuan Wu. It seems almost the same situation: Yuan Wu knows, but cannot say it. Ta Hui does not know, but can say it. Just living with the master, imbibing his energy, watching his grace – the way he walks, the way he sits, the way he remains silent…
Rarely, once in a while, Yuan Wu speaks a word or sentence. His statements are collected in a small book, ‘Blue Cliff Record’, but they are almost impossible to understand. They don’t seem to be related to each other, relevant to each other, they look fragmentary. They don’t create a system.
Even though his words were recorded in ‘Blue Cliff Record’, Yuan Wu never addressed the people. On the contrary, he simply asked Ta Hui just to look into the ‘Blue Cliff Record’ and express his opinion, say what he wanted to say, and whether what he had said conveyed anything or was just a futile exercise. In every case Ta Hui completely comprehended the subtle meaning…
The discourses that are going to follow were given when he was not enlightened, but he was very clear in explaining everything to the ordinary people. He moved amongst laymen, he talked to the ordinary people, and he talked in a way that they could understand. His whole approach was that the great masters are not available to the people; they are available only to very intimate disciples, or perhaps, only to the devotees – who will take care of the millions? So he started moving amongst the people, and the people were rejoicing; that’s why the emperor honored him as a great master, as a sun of awareness.
Masters don’t move, they don’t go to the people; they know the gap between them and the ordinary people is too big, almost unbridgeable. Unless somebody comes close to the master on his own accord, there is no way for the master to penetrate his being…
I have chosen Ta Hui to help you understand the difference between the teacher and the master, because many religions have lost their masters. For example, Jainism in India has had no masters, no enlightened persons at all, for centuries – only teachers.
Without an enlightened being, the religion loses its soul. It is only the small stream of enlightened people that keeps the religion breathing and its heart beating, that keeps it alive, flowering.
And one enlightened person is not just a singular phenomenon; he spreads his illumination all around. Whereever he is, he carries a certain energy field, and whoever is receptive will be pulled into the energy field. The teacher has no energy field. He is just repeating mechanically like a parrot.” (pp. 3,4,6,12)

Talks in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium

* The Invitation. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona, India. Editors: Ma Dhyan Sagar. Sw Anand Robin. Introduction: Ma Anand Shanti. Design: Sw Anand Naropa. Paintings on beginning and end pages: Kasue Hashimoto (Masahino Art University, Tokyo). Typing: Ma Deva Radhika. Production: Sw Anand Rupen. Sw Veet Santap. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1988 (no year). First edition. 374 pages. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 750 g. ISBN 3-89338-035-3. Period: 21.08 am – 05.09 pm 1987. 30 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Chuang Tzu Auditorium and Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers. For further information about Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
Distributed in the U.S.A. by Chidvilas, Boulder, Colorado. Distributed in Europe by The Rebel Publishing House GmbH, Cologne, West Germany.
In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
On back flap: “He has provided us a rare insight into our lives and times. He had ridiculed us, pushed us… hurt us and, thereby, made richer human beings out of us. He made us think for ourselves; forced us to reject him, and by that act of rejection brought us closer to him – and in a strange kind of way, closer to ourselves.” Pritish Nandy. Editor, Publisher. The Illustrated Weekly of India.

Introduction by Ma Anand Shanti. Excerpts:
“BEWARE… accepting an Invitation from Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is dangerous! Your life may never be the same.
The discourses which made up this book were given to disciples and other visitors to the ashram in Poona, India, during August 1987. At the beginning of this series Bhagwan was asked, “Can you say who you are?…
One of the things that have consistently amazed me about Bhagwan is the extent to which he studied all aspects of Western knowledge – not because he needed the knowledge but so that he understood in detail which particular prisons we were inhabiting! Bhagwan’s insight goes far beyond the dualistic concepts of Western philosophy and morality: the dichotomies of right/wrong, good/evil, either/or. In fact he calls our obsession with either/or the disease of Aristoteles…
Now sitting with Bhagwan in discourse every day I am filled with the wonder that I knew as a child. Here, I am sitting in the presence of a being whose silence is so full that we are awed. The words pale in significance to the moments of silent communion. Bhagwan has often said, “Don’t listen to my words, listen to my silences.” So if while reading Bhagwan’s words you are able to glimpse the magnificence of his silence, then this book is an invitation to you to go on a journey into the silence of your own heart.” Ma Anand Shanti. Poona, India. May 1988. (No page number)

First discourse in this series, ‘Throw the Bucket and Draw the Water’, 21.08.1987 am. Opening words:
“Beloved Bhagwan, Can You say who you are?
Maneesha, I am an invitation for all those who are seeking, searching, and have a deep longing in their hearts to find their home.
I am an answer to the question that everybody is, but cannot formulate – a question that is more a quest than a question, more a thirst than a verbal, mental inquiry; a thirst that one feels in every cell and fiber of his being, but has no way to bring to words and ask.
I am an answer for that question which you cannot ask and you cannot expect that it could be answered.
When I say I am the answer, I don’t mean that I can give you the answer… yes, if you are ready, you can take it. I am just like a well, ready for you to throw your bucket and draw the water for yourself. I have it but I cannot reach to you without your efforts.
Only you can reach to me.
It is a strange invitation.
It will take you on a long pilgrimage and it will end only where you already are. You will have to move many steps and on many paths just to come to yourself, because you have gone far away from yourself. You have completely forgotten the way back.
I am a reminder, a remembrance, of the lost home.
As a person I do not exist.
As a person I only appear.
I exist as a presence.
Since the day I came to know myself, the person disappeared. There is only a presence, a very living presence that can quench your thirst, that can fulfill your longing. Hence, in one word I can say I am an invitation, of course just for those who have a deep longing in their hearts that they are missing themselves – a deep urge, that unless they find themselves, everything else is meaningless. Unless it is your a priori concern, your ultimate concern, such that if it is needed you are even ready to lose everything for it, but you cannot drop it…
There are thousands of desires, but as far as longing is concerned there is only one: to come back home, to find your reality. And in that very finding, you have found all that is of any value – blissfulness, truth, ecstasy.” (p. 2)

* The Great Pilgrimage. From Here to Here. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona, India. Editors: Sw Krishna Prabhu. Ma Prem Taranga. Introduction: Sw Devageet. Design: Ma Anand Peggy. Typing: Ma Deva Anupo. Ma Prem Arya. Production: Ma Prem Amoha. Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1988 (no year). First edition. 345 pages. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 700 g. ISBN 3-89338-165-7. Period: 06.09 am – 03.10 pm 1987. 28 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona.

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers. For further information about Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
Distributed in the U.S.A. by Chidvilas, Boulder, Colorado. Distributed in Europe by The Rebel Publishing House GmbH, Cologne, West Germany.
In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
Questions are asked by Vimal. In a new format where seven joke sutras are strewn throughout the discourses.
On back cover: “He is the rarest and most talented religionist to appear in this century.” Kazuyoshi Kino. Professor of Buddhist Studies. Hosen Gakuen College. Tokyo, Japan.

Introduction by Sw Devageet. Excerpt:
“Bhagwan is at His sharpest in this volume. His words are surgical instruments carving our dis-ease to shreds, laughing all the while, telling jokes while the bits fall all around. He dismembers you and all you feel is love and profound gratitude.
I would thank God there is someone in this madhouse of a world who is sane, and who can infect me with the same sanity. But there ain’t no God, so all I am left with is a great puddle of gratitude for the man who makes my life so juicy and fulfilling.
The Great Pilgrimage is a collection of discourses where, among many other subjects, Bhagwan shows sex in its true colors, just old biological hormones wreaking havoc with our serenity: “Sex is out of date, let love happen. Meditation is nothing but the radiation of love.”
He answers all manner of questions ranging from swordsmanship to music, from enlightenment to conditioning, from sex to age, from women’s rights to psychology. Some get confused, and ask questions out of their confusion. “Your confusion is just thoughts. If you had meditated there would have been no mix up.”
No matter what the subject, the questioner is always the subject under discussion. Straight to the heart of the matter, Bhagwan’s insight flies true to its target, often surprising the questioner. The subtle accuracy of His words is a continuous marvel. Flying on the wings of love, they zero in unerringly true, using the most reliable guidance system in existence – enlightened consciousness. It never misses.
Woven throughout the jokes, the wisdom, the shattering clarity of all these pieces, is meditation. Everything here is straight from the innocence of existence itself, fresh, unpolluted, and entirely original. What a guy is this fellow Bhagwan! How does He keep it up? It goes on and on, but… not really.
Time is running out for Bhagwan’s body. He is the last one to get serious or long-faced about such a small thing, nor should we. But the facts are there. He has been ill for much of this year, and these latest discourses have the special quality of laughter in the face of illness. Biology has no hold over this man. His pilgrimage has long finished. His laughter rings out among the stars, and heaven help the saints when He comes marching in.” Sw Devageet B.D.S. Poona, February 1988. (No page number)

Osho speaking on the Koran:
“Mohammed went to heaven sitting on his horse; the horse also went – without wings. Neither Mohammed had wings nor the horse, but they flew to heaven. This was happening for the first time. Jesus left his donkey here, Francis left his donkey here, only Mohammedans think it was because he was the real prophet…
Now everybody is claiming – Mohammedans claim that the Koran, their holy book, is the only authentic, God-written book, all other books are man-written. And the Koran is not even worth being considered as literature; it is just third class. Because Mohammed was uneducated, he did not write it; whatever he was saying has been colleted by people, but every sentence shows his uneducatedness, his unculturedness.
But Mohammed claims to be the last prophet of God, after him there will be no prophet because God has sent his final message through him, and that is the Koran. All old messages are canceled – The Bible, the Vedas, are all cancelled, because when the new message has arrived it cancells all the old. It is the most developed, the most evolved message; it is so perfect that there is no need of anybody else to bring a message to the world. Now, all these religions are claiming such things.
Mohammedans say that when Mohammed used to move in Arabia – which is a desert and really becomes burning hot when the sun comes to the middle of the sky – God used to send a beautiful white cloud which used to move just over Mohammed’s head, keeping him under shadow… a divine umbrella!
If meditation becomes more prevalent, then you will get free from all these prejudices; hence no religion wants meditation, although they may talk about it.
To me, neither God is important nor heaven nor angels – all those are just hypothetical. To me, meditation is the very soul of religion. But it can be attained only if you move rightly. Just a single step in a wrong direction… And you are always moving on a razor’s edge!
Begin with love of the body, which is your outermost part. Start loving your mind – and if you love your mind you will decorate it, just the way you decorate your body. You keep it clean, you keep it fresh; you don’t want your body to smell horrible to people, you want your body to be loved and respected by others. Your presence should not be simply tolerated but welcomed.” (Session 13, p. 158)

* Jesus Crucified Again. This Time in Ronald Reagan’s America. The Rebel Publishing House Gmbh, Cologne, West Germany, 1988. Period: Oregon, World Tour and Poona Two (06.11.1987 pm). Subject: Quotes from Discourses on Events in America. Places: Rajneesh Mandir, Oregon, World Tour locations and Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. See: Bibliography / Oregon / Compilations and Special Editions.

Mantra Series. Continued from Chuang Tzu auditorium

* Satyam Shivam Sundram. Truth Godliness Beauty. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona, India. Editors: Sw Krishna Prabhu. Ma Veet Shabda. Introduction: Sw Chetan. Design: Sw Veet Ateet (Graphic design). Paintings: Ma Anand Meera Kasué. Typing: Ma Antar Anudiksha. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Ma Prem Amoha. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1988 (no year). First edition. (The Mantra Series). 373 pages. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 750 g. ISBN 3-89338-031-0. Period: 07.11 am – 21.11 pm 1987. 30 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place Gautam the Buddha Auditorium and Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona.

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers. For further information about Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
Distributed in the U.S.A. by Chidvilas, Boulder, Colorado. Distributed in Europe by The Rebel Publishing House GmbH, Cologne, West Germany.
In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
On back jacket: “[Rajneesh] has provided us a rare insight into our lives and times. He has ridiculed us, hurt us and, thereby, made richer human beings out of us. Made us think for ourselves. Forces us to reject him – and, by that act of rejection, brought us closer to him. And, in a strange kind of way, closer to ourselves.” Pritish Nandy. Editor, Publisher, The Illustrated Weekly of India.
First discourse series to be given in the reconstructed Gautama the Buddha Auditorium (07-09.11.1987) and then back to Chuang Tzu Auditorium.

Introduction by Sw Chetan. Excerpt:
“Bhagwan is one of the rarest individuals in the history of mankind, in that His is the experience of Satyam, Shivam, Sundram. Bhagwan is utterly unique, because He can clearly see a way through for mankind into an age where man can live at peace with himself. Where he can be free to seek and find the experience of truth.
It looks as if Bhagwan is harassed from all sides of society, even to the extent of being “legally” barred from almost all the countries of the earth. And so, the seekers, who, by the grace of existence, want to be with Him, to share His experience, have gathered, here, at His feet in the Chuang Tzu Auditorium in Rajneeshdham, Poona, India.
This small oasis is a nest for the hatching of the greatest possible experience for every person on this earth. A small, marble-floored hall, with green walls of masonry on one side, and green plants and trees on the other. The seeker waits, the chair sits empty, and the Master comes…
“This is a mystery school.
“All my effort is not to give you knowledge, but to take all knowledge away from you, to make you so innocent, just like a newborn child who is fully conscious, sensitive, alert, but knows nothing. His not knowing makes every child experience something which is available only to the greatest sages of the world.” Sw Chetan. Poona, March 1988. (No page number)

First discourse in this series, ‘Satyam, Shivam, Sundram’, 07.11.1987 am. Opening words:
“Beloved Bhagwan, What is the mystic conception of ultimate reality?
Maneesha, the mystic’s conception of the ultimate reality is the only authentic, real experience. It is not a thought or a concept, but an existential experience.
But the mystic does not deal with the mind. His whole effort is to get rid of the prison of the mind. The mystic is not a philosopher; his world is beyond all philosophies. Philosophies are simply by-products of mental processes. They do not reflect the reality they only reflect you. That’s why there are so many philosophers in the world, contradicting each other. The reality is one. How can there be so many philosophies? – there are not so many mystical experiences. There is only one experience; neither time changes it, nor space. Since millennia, the mystic in every country, in every race, in every age has experienced the same reality. The philosopher thinks about reality; the mystic simply drops all thinking. In his silence, utter silence and serenity, he becomes a mirror, and the reality reflects itself.
The mystic is the greatest flowering of human consciousness. His ultimate vision can be described in three beautiful words which have been used for thousands of years and there has not been any improvement on them. They are three words from the ancientmost sources: Satyam, Shivam, Sundram.” (Session 1, p. 2)

* Sat Chit Anand. Truth Consciousness Bliss. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona, India. Editor: Sw Anand Robin. Introduction: Sw Anand Robin. Design: Sw Shivananda. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Typing: Ma Satyam Ektara. Sw Prem Bhaskar. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Ma Jivan Mada. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1988 (no year). First edition. (The Mantra Series). 404 pages. Illustrated with b&w graphics and color paintings. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 790 g. ISBN 3-89338-042-6. Period: 22.11 am – 06.12 pm 1987. 30 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers. For further information about Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
Distributed in the U.S.A. by Chidvilas, Boulder, Colorado. Distributed in Europe by The Rebel Publishing House GmbH, Cologne, West Germany.
In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)

Introduction by Sw Anand Robin. Excerpt:
“These discourses given by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh in Poona in November and December, 1987, are the second in a series on the five ‘most significant, most deep-going mystic sounds… These five I can say to you belong to the universal religious consciousness, not to any organized religion, because they have come from individual mystics. They have poured their enlightenment, they have poured their awareness into these five mantras.”
Bhagwan, the twentieth century enlightened master, pours his heart, his awareness, his enlightenment every day onto those disciples fortunate enough to be sitting with him and then, using every modern media device, reaches out to anyone who can hear him.
This book is an opportunity to see Bhagwan’s vast wisdom and compassionate, earthly humor explain with magical simplicity the wisdom of these ancient truths. As man’s madness accelerates towards destruction, Bhagwan insists that the only hope is for intelligence to see that truth is beyond the mind. “You have come to the limit of your mind, but you are more than your mind.” (No page number)

First discourse, ‘Everybody Can Be a Mystic’, 22.11.1987 am. Opening words:
“Beloved Bhagwan, Is there any definition of the ultimate experience other than Satyam-Shivam-Sundram – “Truth, Godliness and Beauty”?
The experience of the ultimate, Maneesha, is always the same. But the expression can be different. The expression depends on the mystic; the experience does not depend on him.
The first definition I gave you is the definition by the poetic, aesthetic, sensitive individual, for whom Satya can come – the truth can come – only as beauty. And truth and beauty create the ultimate peak of godliness. The poet cannot imagine that beauty will not be part of the ultimate unity. His eyes are receptive to beauty. Truth comes to him and is transformed, in his expression, as beauty. Beauty is the god of the poet, of the painter, of all creative artists.
So the first definition was the definition from the artistic soul. Most of the mystics have been poets – not ordinary poets, concerned with the mundane, but poets of the sacred. This sensitivity of the poet is essential to arrive at the definition of the ultimate experience as “Truth, Godliness and Beauty.”
But there are other mystics too, who are not poetic… because to be a poet takes a certain talent. Everybody can be a mystic, because the mystic is our very being, the unfolding of the mystic rose within us. But not everybody can be a poet. Poetry is a talent, though it comes very close to mysticism. So either the poet becomes the mystic – then comes the definition Satyam-Shivam-Sundram – or the mystic suddenly finds himself filled with tremendous beauty and starts singing and dancing out of his spontaneity. He may not be linguistically right; that is not his concern…
In Sanskrit, unlike English, words can be joined together. Sanskrit has an approach… and perhaps the approach has come from the enlightened ones. So many people have become enlightened in this land. They have left their impact on Sanskrit, the language. They will not say Sat-Chit-Anand the way I have explained it to you. I have cut one word into three, just to explain it to you, because in English there cannot be one word for all three. You cannot join truth, consciousness, blissfulness into a single word. The Sanskrit word is sachchidanand. All three words are joined. Sat is there, chit is there, anand is there – but they are not separate, and there is no gap: sachchidanand.” (Session 1, pp. 2,3)

* Om Mani Padme Hum. The Sound of Silence. The Diamond in the Lotus. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Editor: Ma Deva Sarito. Introduction: Ma Deva Sarito. Design: Sw Satyamurti. Photography: Sw Samarpan Avikal. Sw Shastro. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Sw Deva Prashant. Sw Prem Ali. Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Sw Prem Prabodh. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. (The Mantra Series). 342 pages. Illustrated with b&w photographics and color paintings on inner cover. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 735 g. ISBN 3-89338-050-7. Period: 07.12 am 1987 – 17.01 am 1988. 30 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium and Chuang Tzu Auditorium (07.12 pm,1987), Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Books by Osho Rajneesh (New entry in Photobiographies: Shree Rajneesh. A Man of Many Climates, Seasons and Rainbows. Through the Eye of the Camera). Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers. For further information about Osho Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
This is the first discourse series published after name change, now with Osho Rajneesh as author. On back flap:
“On Febuary 27, 1989,
the disciples of
Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh
decided to call Him:
OSHO RAJNEESH.
“OSHO” is a term derived
from ancient Japanese,
and was first used by Eka,
to address his master,
Bodhidharma.
‘O’ means “with great
respect, love and gratitude”
as well as “synchronicity”
and “harmony.”
‘SHO’ means “multidimensional
expansion of consciousness”
and “existence showering from
all directions.”
On back jacket: “(Osho Rajneesh) is the greatest incarnation since Gautama Buddha in India. He is a living Buddha.” Lama Karmapa. Head of Tibetan Buddhism. Quoted in: Il Giorno, Italy. April, 1988.

Introduction by Ma Deva Sarito. Excerpt:
“The message of Osho Rajneesh is, in a way, very simple – as simple and self-evident as all timeless truths are. And that is, that man’s difficulty lies in the fact that he has divided himself and his world into pieces, and has labelled these pieces opposite and irreconcilable. He calls them by various names: matter and spirit, mundane and sacred, lower and higher, hate and love, selfishness and charity, man and woman, black and white, right and wrong.
Of course these divisions are unnatural, and we know in our hearts that whenever we choose one against the other, whenever we try to wrap up the stuff of our lives and fit it into one of the boxes, it creates a tension, an anxiety, a feeling of something missing. We have created, out of this split, a planet where nation is against nation, race against race, rich against poor, religion against religion. The planet is sick, and we all know that the sickness has reached a critical point. Paradoxically, the crisis has united us at least in the common understanding that if we are not to end by murdering one another and the very earth that sustains us, we must find a way to somehow heal ourselves and become whole.
In this series of talks, the Master returns to this theme again and again, constructing a map of many dimensions, of many colors – a map that reveals a land where nothing is renounced, where you can have your cake and eat it too; where East and West not only meet, but merge into the best of both worlds… where we claim for ourselves both the earth and the sky as our home….” Ma Deva Sarito. Poona, 1989. (No page number)

First discourse, ‘The music of OM’, 07.12.1987 am. Opening words:
“Beloved Maser, would you like to say something about the famous Tibetan mantra, “Om Mani Padme Hum”?
Maneesha, the only country in the world which has devoted all its genius to the inner exploration is Tibet. Its findings are of tremendous value. Om Mani Padme Hum is one of the most beautiful expressions for the ultimate experience. Its meaning is “the sound of silence, the diamond in the lotus.”
Silence also has its sound, its music… although the outer ears cannot hear it, just as the outer eyes cannot see it. We have six outer senses. In the past man knew only that we have five outer senses, the sixth is a new discovery. It is inside your ears; hence people failed to recognize it. It is the sense of balance. When you feel giddy or when you see a drunkard walking, it is the sense of balance that is affected.
Just as these six senses are used to experience the outer, exactly the same six senses exist to experience the inner – to see it, to hear it, to feel its utter balance, its beauty. It is invisible to the outer eyes but not to the inner. You cannot touch it with your outer senses, but the inner senses are absolutely immersed in it.
Om is the sound when everything else disappears from your being – no thought, no dream, no projections, no expectations, not even a single ripple – your whole lake of consciousness is simply silent; it has become just a mirror. In those rare moments you hear the sound of silence. It is the most valuable experience because it not only shows a quality of the inner music – it also shows that the inner is full of harmony, joy, blissfulness. all that is implied in the music of Om.
You are not to say it. If you say it you will miss the real thing. You have to hear it, you have to be utterly calm and quiet and suddenly it is all around you, a very subtle dance. And the moment you are able to hear it, you have entered into the very secrets of existence. You have become so subtle that now you deserve that all the mysteries be exposed to you.
Existence waits till you are ready.
In the East all the religions without exception agree on this point, that the sound which is heard in the final, highest peak of silence is something similar to Om.
The word Om is not written alphabetically in any language of the East because it is not part of language. It is written as a symbol; hence the same symbol is used in Sanskrit, in Pali, in Prakit, in Tibetan – everywhere the same symbol, because all the mystics of all the ages have reached to the same experience, that it is not part of our mundane world; hence it should not be written in letters. It should have its own symbol which is beyond language. It does not mean anything as far as mind is concerned, but it means tremendously much as far as your spiritual growth is concerned.” (Session 1, p. 2)

* Hari Om Tat Sat. The Divine Sound That Is The Truth. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Editor: Ma Shivam Suvarna. Introduction: Sw Prem Islam. Design: Sw Deva Anugito. Photography: Sw Divyananda. Sw Premgit. Sw Shivananda. Ma Prem Diwani. Ma Kamadevi. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Proofreading: Ma Chetan Rupa. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Sw Prem Prabodh. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. (The Mantra Series). 338 pages. Illustrated with b&w photographics and color paintings on inner cover. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 735 g. ISBN 3-89338-046-9. Period: 17.01 pm – 25.02 pm 1988. 30 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK) (+acc)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Books by Osho Rajneesh. (The Mystery School 1986 – present: The World of Zen. Box. 5 volumes; Zen: All the Colors of the Rainbow. Box. 5 volumes; Osho Rajneesh: The present Day Awakened One Speaks on the Ancient Masters of Zen. Box. 7 volumes. Each volume is also available individually). Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers. For further information about Osho Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
On back jacket: “A former university academic, Rajneesh has been recognized… as an important spiritual philosopher… The teachings of Rajneesh in fact encompass many religions, but he is not defined by any of them. He is an illuminating speaker on Zen, Taoism, Tibetan Buddhism, Christianity, and ancient Greek philosophy… and also a prolific author.” Nevill Drury. Dictionary of Mysticism and the Occult.

Introduction by Sw Prem Islam. Excerpts:
“His answers are full of this quality of ordinariness. He demonstrates no psychic powers, He never feeds the part of us which hungers for esoteric secrets… He is very funny – the printed page cannot convey how much laughter there was during these discourses. But He does not intend to be a spiritual entertainment; his words are not exciting New Age wisdom to enrich our lives, to help us forward a little. They are an earthquake to shatter the foundation of our lives, to sweep the flowers of our being to bloom. This man means business. He intends us to realize our enlightenment…
I have found no one else with the depth of insight into the life and the breath of vision of planetary transformation which Osho Rajneesh has, and I believe it is not exaggerated to say the commune of seekers gathered around Him is the most important experiment in the world today. He is making us understand that enlightenment is a reality, that what happened to Gautam Buddha and Lao Tzu and to Him can and will happen to all of us. Human beings desperately need that understanding. We live from instinctual behaviour patterns inherited from our hominid ancestors, and we believe these overwhelming hormonal impulses are all that life consists of. In this delusion we hyperintelligent chimpanzees are turning our planet into a hell of war, starvation, and pollution. Political solutions are a constantly unfulfilled mirage; but we have to pretend to believe in them because there seems to be no alternative, and to live without even the hope of solutions is to invite a despair too deep to be borne.
Osho Rajneesh is saying there is an alternative: enlightenment, the discovery inside ourselves of the original source of life and joy; far beyond our instincts, and yet the most ordinary and natural experience. This book is an invitation from Him, for you to make that discovery inside yourself.” Sw Prem Islam M.A.,M.Sc. (pp. x-xii)

First discourse, The master thief sound, 17.02.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Beloved Master, I have heard You say, Hari Om Tat Sat: the divine sound – that is the truth. When You speak I hear the sound of truth resonating in me, yet I am not enlightened. How is it that I can recognize that which I haven’t realized?
Maneesha, Hari Om Tat Sat: the divine sound – that is the truth… It is one of the mahavakyas, the great sayings which have been embedded in the hearts of the mystics since eternity. It is not something theoretical, not something philosophical, it is something existential.
Those who have gone within themselves have already heard a strange sound, which can only be called the sound of existence itself. It is difficult to reduce that sound into language. Hence for centuries, as far back as we can go, Om, the sound, has been represented not by any alphabetical word but by a symbol.
That symbol is beyond any alphabet. It does not belong to any language. Hence the Tibetans can use it; Mahavira can use it, who was using a language called Prakit; Gautam Buddha can use it, who was speaking in a language called Pali. There is no other symbol in the whole world which does not belong to any particular language, but is simply symbolic of a certain experience that can happen to anyone. And why have they not reduced it to some linguistic form? It is not without reason.
The sound of Om is heard only when your mind is completely silent, when you have gone beyond all language, all thinking, when there is pure silence, not even a ripple. Suddenly you hear a music. There is no instrument playing it. It seems it is simply the very heartbeat of existence. That’s why it doesn’t matter whether someone is a Buddhist or a Hindu or a Jaina. It does not depend on your philosophy, on your religion. It depends on the depth of your reach towards your very inner center. There, suddenly, you are overwhelmed.” (p. 2)

* Om Shantih Shantih Shantih. The Soundless Sound Peace, Peace, Peace. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Editor: Ma Dhyan Sagar. Ma Deva Nirvesha. Introduction: Ma Shantam Avirvhava. Design: Sw Veet Ateet. Photography: Sw Vijayo. Sw Premgit. Sw Veet Ateet. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Darkroom Work: Sw Prem Prabodh. Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. (The Mantra Series). 290 pages. Illustrated with b&w photographics and color paintings on inner cover. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 660 g. ISBN 3-89338-048-5. Period: 26.02 am – 18.03 pm 1988. 27 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh (All books available AT COST PRICE mentioned for Rebel Publishing, Cologne, and Sadhana Foundation, Poona, India. For America is mentioned: Also available in bookstores nationwide at Walden Books). Books by Osho Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers. For further information about Osho Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
On back jacket: “In his religious discourses… [Osho Rajneesh] has shown an insight into the working of the human mind far deeper than most professionals that I have met in my career.” Nigel D.W. Armistead. Ph.D. Author of Reconstructing Social Psychiatry.

Introduction by Ma Shantam Avirbhava. Excerpts:
“In this book Osho Rajneesh clarifies in a new and expanded way His world vision. It is an unsettling reminder of how far we haven’t come as a humanity which continues to declare itself as civilized… The Master gives a rare and unexpected insight into His prolific use of humor as a teaching tool. He explains that there are two ways to get out of the ups and downs of joy and suffering. The easiest way is to develop awareness in times of misery and suffering. So His humor creates an ambience which fosters awareness and helps it to grow…
He clarifies something else in this book, something which has confused seekers throughout history. It is the age-old question of the head versus the heart, logical thought versus the “language of the heart.” Shree Rajneesh says they are both the cause of misunderstanding. Even love, as we commonly know it, is just an emotion, and not real love. Real love, He says, is not a product of emotion. It is an expression of one’s very being. And He indicates how to distinguish the real from the emotional substitute… This funny, simple and practical book is a thoroughly modern handbook of wisdom and love. It measures the genuine pulse of life, the throbbing reality we all live every day.” Ma Shantam Avirbhava. (No page number)

First discourse, ‘Sound is our mind – silence is our being’, 26.02.1988 am. Opening words:
“Beloved Master, I am always intrigued by Eastern scriptures that begin with Om, Shanti Shanti Shanti and end with Om, Shanti Shanti Shanti. Would You please talk about this?
Maneesha, the East has approached reality in an almost diametrically opposite way to the West. First, the simple meaning of the word should be understood, and then all the implications. All Eastern scriptures begin with Om, shanti shanti shanti and they also end with the same.
Om is the symbol of the universal heartbeat; it is not a word. And as you come closer and closer to the universal heartbeat, the byproduct is a deepening silence. Shanti means silence and it is always repeated three times because by the time you reach to the fourth, you are no more – just the silence has remained. You have disappeared as an entity separate from the universe.
The West has not been able to begin even a single scripture with this intention. It is understandable. They never went into the deeper communion between your heart and the bigger heart of the universe. They have taken a wrong route, that of fighting, that of conquering, that of being victorious. They have chosen to be extroverts.
Their world is true, but they don’t know anything about themselves. The outside is true and the inside has not been explored.” (Session 1, p. 2)

* Yaa-Hoo! The Mystic Rose. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Editor: Ma Deva Sarito. Introduction: Sw Anand Vimal. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Photography: Sw Divyananda. Sw Prem Sambuddha. Sw Prem Prabodh. Sw Prem Prabhu. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Sw Shivananda. Typing: Ma Deva Radhika. Ma Anand Ritu. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Sw Anand Rupen. Ma Premo. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1988 (no year). First edition. 374 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos and color paintings on inner cover. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 915 g. ISBN 3-89338-038-8. Period: 19.03 pm – 21.04 pm 1988. 30 discourses; pm and am. Subject: Questions and Answers. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Books by Osho Rajneesh. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions (17 titles translated into Russian). Rajneesh Meditation Centers. For further information about Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
Before title page: “Yaa-Hoo! Known as the Mantra salute, “Yaa-Hoo!” is the new greeting between sanyasins all over the world. Bhagwan has said, “The significance of this Mantra Salute is the raising of the hands to the stars, indicating the longing for higher consciousness. Shouting the mantra ‘Yaa-Hoo!’ is also a very healthy thing. It has very good vibrations. You can do it when you wake up in the morning, in the bathroom, anywhere…” (With photo of Osho standing with both arms raised in salute).
On front flap: “On April 21, 1988 Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh introduced The Mystic Rose Meditation (see chapter 30 of this book). Its three stages are “laughter,” “tears” and “the watcher on the hills.” This meditation is but one example of the magic and mystery to be found in these pages.”
Continued on back flap: “This book will take you step by step on an enchanted journey of words, silence and pictures. It will take you to a world where magic held the stage, night after night, and mystery came to earth and played in our midst. Savor this story, line by line, page by page. Taste the atmosphere created by the beautiful photographs: allow the first-hand reports to penetrate deep inside you… When you have finished, if you just close your eyes and feel… you will be able to hear the laughter, the roar of the mighty Yaa-Hoo! The voice of Truth resounding in an empty hall, full of people. The mystic rose resonating deep inside you.”
Design format has changed from two columns of text on each page to text in one column on better paper quality to present a number of photos in b&w from Gautama the Buddha Auditorium.
Maneesha is reading the questions except for a few days when Vimal is reading while she is having a migraine.

Introduction by Sw Anand Vimal. Excerpts:
“The symbol of the mystic rose vibrates tremendously significant memories… It was one day in the early morning, a gathering of seekers just like you are… but the time goes twenty-five centuries back. Gautama Buddha was expected to deliver a morning sermon. Everybody was surprised…
In a way you really had to be there.
It was twenty-five centuries later, and the greatest piece of “living theater” ever performed. And those who participated are beginning to feel the petals of the rose, slowly opening to the sun.
Center stage, sits the Enlightened Master, mystic, sage, magician and Master of Ceremonies, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh.
Enter, the two lost reporters from Bunte magazine; the two crazy Chinamen… the renunciate in his bamboo hut, the mysterious woman in a sari, the ghost of Jawaharlal Nehru… and Yaa-Hoo! We all fell down! And witness, the birth of the Mystic Rose….
This book will take you step by step on an enchanted journey of words, silence and pictures. It will take you to a world where magic held the stage, night after night, and mystery came to earth and played in our midst.
The stage became more and more full of strange and wonderful characters. The comedy and craziness built up and up; until on a hot and balmy night, the storm broke, and the stage was suddenly empty. All that was left were a few dry leaves, blowing in the wind…
In the beautiful days that followed, there remained only one thing to do: “let go” and celebrate. With the Master’s return, the story continues… with a deeper laughter, a profound silence and a new awareness, that this is no ordinary play.
Savor this story, line by line, page by page. Taste the atmosphere created by the beautiful photographs; allow the first-hand reports to penetrate deep inside you…
When you have finished, if you just close your eyes and feel… you will be able to hear the laughter, the roar of the mighty Yaa-Hoo! The voice of Truth resounding in an empty hall full of people. And, maybe you will find that you didn’t have to be there after all.” Sw Anand Vimal, Poona, May 1988. (No page number)

Session 3, ‘Heart is the soil. Trust is the climate’. First question:
“Beloved Bhagwan, in what soil and in which climate might one find the mystic rose?
Maneesha, the symbol of the mystic rose vibrates tremendously significant memories…
It was one day in the early morning, a gathering of seekers just like you are… but the time goes twenty-five centuries back. Gautama Buddha was expected to deliver his morning sermon.
Everybody was surprised… He came right on time, carrying a rose in his hand. They had listened to him for many years, and he has never carried anything. Everybody wondered: What is this rose, and why is he carrying it? But they sat silently – perhaps he will explain.
And he did explain, but not with words.
He sat silently, looking at the rose. The rose was immensely beautiful. So were those two eyes, so was that silent moment – pregnant, expectant, that he is going to say something very special.
He was – but he was not using words.
There are things which can be shown but cannot be said.
The silence became heavy; people were not accustomed. This behavior of Gautama Buddha was so unexpected, so new. Everybody sat like a marble statue and Buddha was looking at the rose with such blissfulness, showering so much love and so much blessing and so much grace on the rose that nobody dared to interrupt him and ask, What is going on?
At that very moment…
Mahakashyap was a very strange disciple of Gautama Buddha; he is known to be the founder of the long tradition of Zen.
And at this moment when Gautama Buddha was looking at the rose is the moment of a source that is still blossoming. Perhaps it is the only rose that has not faded away. Many others have blossomed and faded away.
Mahakashyapa’s laughing shocked everybody. They were not even courageous enough to ask the question, and this strange fellow – he was strange from the very beginning. Since he had come he had never asked a question. He had monopolized a tree, under which nobody else dared to sit. Whether he was late or early, his place was certain.
People even wondered – does he understand what Gautama Buddha is saying? or does he simply take a good morning sleep? because he always listened with closed eyes. He never made any friends; even if people wanted to talk to him, he would simply make one simple sign.
That’s the sign which Avirbhava makes to me. Whenever I want to say something to her, either she screams to stop me, or she makes this sign…
Slowly, slowly people accepted that Mahakashyap was a little bit crazy… but a very silent and beautiful person. He was a prince, had left his kingdom. He just came to see Gautama Buddha and never went back. He never even asked for initiation. He simply touched Gautama Buddha’s feet, tears rolled down from his eyes and he said to Gautama Buddha, “I am grateful that you initiated me.”
Those who were present said, “This is strange, he has taken everything upon himself. He has touched the feet, he has cried and now he is thanking Gautama Buddha: ‘I am thankful and grateful that you have initiated me.'”
And since then there had been no communication, verbally at least, between Mahakashyap and Gautama Buddha.
But this day – it must have been after ten years – he laughed and people became aware that he was still here. People had started forgetting. A person who remains for ten years without making any noise, naturally, is taken for granted. Just as the tree was taken for granted, he was also taken for granted.
But his sudden burst of laughter…
Gautama Buddha called him close and gave him the rose. And he told the other ten thousand disciples, “What I can give you in words I have given to you. And what I cannot give in words I am transferring to Mahakashyap.”” (Session 3, p. 22)

Epilogue on p. 349: Storms will be coming again and again, but you have to remember…
I wanted you to know that I am not an old-style Zen master, but I also hit – in my own way, more sophisticated. I also destroy your clingings, your egos; I also destroy your taking me for granted, because one day suddenly I will be gone, just like the storm will be gone. Before I am gone, I would like you to blossom into the biggest roses possible.” April 9, 1988.
(In the two weeks following Bhagwan’s “Zen stick” of April 8, we interviewed people about what their experiences had been that evening, and how it had affected them. These are excerpts from those interviews. Ed.)”
More on the incidents in Buddha Hall during the storm in: Part Seven. Section 7.5 Discourses in Buddha Hall Auditorium.

Talks on Zen and Zen Masters

* Live Zen. A New Therapy is Born Therapy through Gibberish. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Volume 1 of 5 in boxed set (The World of Zen). Editor: Ma Dhyan Sagar. Introduction: Ma Anand Ritu. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Sw Shivananda. Typing: Ma Rashmi. Sw Gyan Atol. Production: Ma Prem Sonar. Sw Prem Visarjan. Ma Deva Radhika. Sw Prem Prabhu. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1988 (no year). First edition. 306 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos and color paintings on jacket and inner cover. Hardcover. Size: 19,5×12 cm. Weight: 370 g. ISBN 3-89338-032-9. Period: 22.04 pm – 26.05 pm 1988. 17 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Foreign Language Editions. Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
Before title page: Dedicated to the suchness of everything.
Bhagwan declares the first German Zen Master, Niskriya.
From now on only discourses in the evenings.
Sutras and all questions read by Maneesha are at the beginning of each chapter. In this series the new format for Osho’s discourses included ‘The No-Mind Meditation: Therapy Through Gibberish’.
Zen sutras, anecdotes and masters quoted: Joshu (two chapters), Kyosei (two chapters), Hyakujo, Obaku, Chinso, Chimon, Tozan, Ummon, Kyozen, Seppo, Kasan, Chokei and Hofuku (one chapter), Tanka.

Introduction by Ma Anand Ritu:
“In this small book Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh leads us through the mysterious world of the ancient Zen masters. What looks like insoluble riddles becomes a doorway to the unknown.
Out of this series of discourses a new therapy was born – the No-Mind Meditation. To know the no-mind of Zen, Bhagwan says we need to rid ourselves of repressions. The No-Mind Meditation consists of one hour of gibberish followed by one hour of silence. “How long can you go on? – the mind becomes empty. Slowly, slowly a deep nothingness… and in that nothingness a flame of awareness. It is always present, surrounded by your gibberish. The gibberish has to be taken out; that is your poison.”
To enter this book is to have a peek into the world of no-mind.” Ma Anand Ritu. Poona, India 1988. (p. xi)

“Note to the Reader
In April of 1988, Bhagwan introduced a new element into His daily discourses. For the first time in more than thirteen years, disciples and seekers had the opportunity to experience a specific meditation process in Bhagwan’s presence, with His guidance.
In this series of discourses, the meditation consists of two stages. The first is a silent gathering of energy within, sitting absolutely still, without any movement of the body or mind. This is represented by the following symbol: [Square with a black centered dot]
The second stage is let-go, where the participants allow themselves to fall to the floor in total relaxation. This stage of let-go is represented as follows: [Pages in a book unfolding].” (p. xiii)

First discourse, ‘Emptiness, no Holiness’, 22.04.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Beloved Bhagwan, Emperor Wu of Liang asked Bodhidharma, “What is the first principle of the holy teachings?”
Bodhidharma said, “Emptiness, no holiness.” …
Bhagwan, This verse seems to contain the essence of Zen – “No knowing.” Is this why You have called Zen the only living religion?
Maneesha, before you asked the question, the trees have heard it.
It is one of the most fundamental things to be remembered by all of you that a religion is living only when there is no organized doctrine, no system of beliefs, no dogma, no theology. When there is just this silence and the trees enjoying the dance in the breeze, in your heart something grows. It is your own, it does not come from any scripture; nobody can give it to you because it is not knowledge.
That is the greatest difference between all the religions on one side and Zen on the other side. All religions except Zen are dead. They have become fossilized theologies, systems of philosophies, doctrines, but they have forgotten the language of the trees. They have forgotten the silence in which even trees can be heard and understood. They have forgotten the joy that has to be natural and spontaneous to the heart of every living being.
The moment the experience becomes an explanation, an expression, it breathes no more; it is dead – and all over the world people are carrying dead doctrines.
I call Zen the only living religion because it is not a religion, but only a religiousness. It has no dogma, it does not depend on any founder. It has no past; in fact it has nothing to teach you. It is the strangest thing that has happened in the whole history of mankind – strangest because it enjoys in emptiness, it blossoms in nothingness. It is fulfilled in innocence, in not knowing. It does not discriminate between the mundane and the sacred. For it, all that is, is sacred.
Life is sacred whatever form, whatever shape.
Whenever there is something living and alive it is sacred.
Today we are beginning to discuss a few incidents in the long history of Zen – which is unique because no other religion exists on anecdotes. They are not holy scripture; they are simply incidents that have happened.
It is up to you…
If you understand them they can open your eyes and your heart. If you don’t understand them nothing else will ever be able to open your eyes and your heart. And what I am saying is categorical, absolute.
These small anecdotes
in their very smallness
just like dewdrops
contain the whole secret of the ocean.
If you can understand the dewdrop
there is no need to understand the ocean
you have understood it.” (pp. 2-4)

* This. This. A Thousand Times This. The Very Essence of Zen. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Volume 2 of 5 in boxed set (The World of Zen). Editor: Mahasattva Sw Geet Govind. Introduction: Sw Dhyan Yogi. Design: Sw Deva Anugito. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Sw Shivananda. Typing: Ma Anand Nritya. Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Ma Sandipa. Sw Prem Prabhu. Sw Gyan Atol. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1988 (no year). First edition. 262 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos, graphics and color paintings on jacket and inner cover. Hardcover. Size: 19,5×12 cm. Weight: 345 g. ISBN 3-89338-013-2. Period: 27.05 pm – 10.06 pm 1988. 15 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Foreign Language Editions. Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
Following title page: Dedicated to the bamboos for their inner emptiness.
Sutras read by Maneesha are at the beginning of each chapter.
Maneesha’s questions are read by Osho in the discourse.
Zen sutras, anecdotes and masters quoted: Seppo (two chapters), Hyakujo (two chapter), Tozan (three chapters), Sekito, Setcho, Dogo, Tokusan, Kyogen, Ukyu (receiving monk from Joshu Osho’s assembly), Joshu, Kisu,
In Appendix: Experiences of the Meditators. By Ma Prem Maneesha (see Part Seven. Section 7.5), Ma Prem Madhuri and Ma Deva Satito. (pp. 247-255)

Introduction by Sw Dhyan Yogi:
“It was one of those moments that disciples dream of, where years of devotion to the master actually crystallize into a new, unexpected and timeless reality. This series was such a time – so unique, so impossibly beautiful that words seem too frail to describe it. But how else?
Bhagwan is doing something different here. Meditation is not just a space where one hopefully enters, but a spot, a point where one is led. The master is participating, reaching out, entering us as a guide, and walking us backwards – into ourselves.
He allows us in these discourses the direct experience of let-go meditation – not discourses about meditation, discourses in meditation.
And He introduces the now-famous three-step meditation: gibberish, penetrating silence, then let-go – followed by music and celebration. Explosion, implosion, outer, inner, fullness, emptiness. “Pure Zen,” He says, “Here! Now! This!…This!”
Even the weather cooperated with roaring storms, then silence. The bamboos by creaking, then silence. The cuckoos by singing, then silence. The dance of life, and we like tiny flowers prayerfully opening to Bhagwan’s light, to His eyes, behind huge sunglasses, twinkling like doors to the divine.
For the sincere seeker this series is a must. What happened here will revolutionize the very meaning of the word “meditation.” This is a dividing line between the old and the new.” Sw Dhyan Yogi, M.D. (pp. viii-ix)

Following the Introduction is this Note to the Reader:
“In April of 1988, Bhagwan introduced a new element into His daily discourses. For the first time in more than thirteen years, His audience had the opportunity to experience a specific meditation process in Bhagwan’s presence, with His guidance.
Over a period of several weeks, the process evolved into its present form, and the text of each night’s meditation is included in this book.
Each stage of the meditation is preceded by a signal from Bhagwan for a drumbeat, which is represented in the text by the following symbol:
[eight half circles around a center spot]
The first stage is gibberish, which Bhagwan has described as “cleansing your mind of all kinds of dust… speaking any language that you don’t know… throwing all your craziness out.” For several moments, the hall goes completely mad, as thousands of people shout, scream, babble nonsense and wave their arms about.
The gibberish is represented in the text as follows:
[cut up and mixed nonsense text lines]
The second stage is a period of silent sitting, of gathering the energy within. Bhagwan often says a few words during this stage of the meditation, to help this process go deeper.
The third stage is let-go, where each person allows himself to fall to the floor “as if dead” – in Bhagwan’s words, to “die to the world, die to the body, die to the mind, so only the eternal remains in you.”
A final drumbeat signals the participants to “come back to life,” collecting and remembering the experience so that it can remain as an undercurrent, twenty-four hours a day.” (pp. x-xi)

First discourse, ‘Zen – Your Very Essence’, 27.05.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, Before I start a new series of talks on Zen – called ‘This. This. A Thousand Times This’ – I want to devote today to preparation for the coming Zen anecdotes… absurd yet profound, without any rationality but still as truthful as language allows.
I’m wearing sunglasses in the night; it is due to the courtesy of President Ronald Reagan. His poisoning has created many after-effects. One of them is that my eyes have immensely weakened; they cannot face even the daylight. But even through my glasses I am perfectly able to see you.” (Ch. 1, p. 3)
[In this first discourse Osho talks on his time in Oregon and introduces the new meditation mentioned above].

Last discourse in this series, ‘All Arrows Converge on This’, on 10.06.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, this is the last discourse of the series called, ‘This. This. A Thousand Times This’… is the essence of existence, is the essence of your being, is the essence of Zen – THIS.
THIS is vast:
a small word, it contains
total, universal, eternal truth.
There are no boundaries to THIS.
It never begins
and it never ends.
It is always here.
You can wander here and there, but it is just like a fish moving in the ocean; it is the same ocean whereever it goes. You can be a child, you can be young, you can be old, you can be dead, but THIS remains an eternal truth of your being. Alive or dead you cannot get rid of THIS.
This essential point is being discussed again and again by Zen masters. In different ways they have sung their song, in different ways they have signed their signatures; but only the ways differ, all their arrows converge on THIS. We will see how it has been repeated and why it has been repeated – why for thousands of years those who have known, either said THIS, or remained silent in thisness. But whatever the case, whether they say it or not, they are pointing to THIS by words, by silence, by dance, by music, by just being.” (Ch. 15, p. 232)

* Zen: The Quantum Leap From Mind to No-mind. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Volume 3 of 5 in boxed set (The World of Zen). Editor: Sw Anand Robin. Introduction: Ma Deva Niseema. Design: Sw Shivananda. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Typing: Ma Anand Nayana. Ma Rashmi Bharti. Typesetting: Ma Premo. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Sw Paritosho. Sw Prem Prabodh. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1988 (no year). First edition. 266 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos, graphics and color paintings on jacket and inner cover. Hardcover. Size: 19,5×12 cm. Weight: 350 g. ISBN 3-89338-045-0. Period: 11.06 pm – 26.06 pm 1988. 15 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Foreign Language Editions. Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
On title page: Dedicated to the rainbows as a symbol of total acceptance of all colors of life.
Sutras read by Maneesha are at the beginning of each chapter.
Maneesha’s questions are read by Osho in the discourse.
Rupesh, not Nivadano, is beating the drum. In the first discourse mistakenly addressed as ‘Arup’, see p. 28 on this.
Discourses are now finished with the words:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes Bhagwan.
Can we celebrate now?
YES!”
Zen sutras, anecdotes and masters quoted: Baso (two chapters), Hyakujo (three chapters), Ryuge, Dabai, Sekito (two chapters), Baso, Nangaku, Enkei, Hogen, Rinzai (two chapters), Nanto, Yakusan, Kyozan, Seiko, Kokushi, Sanzo, Nan-Sen, Jimyo, Dogo, Hofuku, Sozan, Daiten, Hogen, Haikyu.
Note to the Reader on pp. x-xi. Same text as in ‘This. This. A Thousand Times This’ (1988).

Introduction by Ma Deva Niseema:
“…to dissolve like snow flakes
into the thin air of silence
“Zen is a simple phenomenon – as simple as the taste of tea. But if you want to explain it, it becomes the most difficult thing in the world.”
Bhagwan, as the ultimate 20th century Zen master, explains the inexplicable – delving his way into our understanding, alternating exquisite gentleness with a merciless sword. His own distinctive interplay of devices characterizes these talks: combining puzzles of ancient Zen anecdotes, earthy jokes, contemporary science, esoteric secrets and the Unexpected. He opens the gap from where a quantum leap can be made.
What is this leap and why do we need to make it?
The quantum leap, according to Bhagwan, is from mind to no-mind – from ego-mind to inner consciousness. It is all that is needed for self transformation and it can happen in the twinkling of an eye. No stopping half way: this is 100% realization of our potential as human beings!
Bhagwan speaking on Zen is a must for anyone who senses “there must be more to life than this.” There is more – and Bhagwan is infusing it into our reality, right here in front of our eyes.” Ma Deva Niseema, M.A. (pp. viii-ix)

First discourse, ‘Babysitting is the Basic Business of All Buddhas’, 11.06.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, it is the beginning of a beginningless existential festival. Zen is festive, it is not scholarly. It condemns scholars as deeply as possible, because the scholar represents the defined mind, cultured mind, borrowed knowledge, dead scriptures. The scholar is a grave. Zen is a living rose of flowers. Nothing in it is dead, it is always and always. It goes on from beginningless to endless: characters change, leaves fall from the trees, new leaves start growing, the old ones disappear, the new ones arrive – it is a constant change. But in existence nothing changes – only on the periphery, only on the circumference, but never in the center. And the center is Zen.
I am happy to begin this series of talks with an anecdote about Baso. He is one of my beloved ones.” (p. 4)

* Zen: The Solitary Bird, Cuckoo of the Forest. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Volume 4 of 5 in boxed set (The World of Zen). Editor: Ma Deva Sarito. Introduction: Sw Dharmabodhi (Count Christoph Keyserlingk). Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Typing: Ma Anand Nayana. Ma Anand Vinito. Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Deva Anugito. Ma Prem Sadhana. Sw Prem Prabodh. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1988 (no year). First edition. 276 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos, graphics and color paintings on jacket and inner cover. Hardcover. Size: 19,5×12 cm. Weight: 350 g. ISBN 3-89338-044-2. Period: 27.06 pm – 11.07 pm 1988. 15 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Foreign Language Editions. Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
On title page: Dedicated to a solitary cuckoo, deep in the forest.
Sutras read by Maneesha are at the beginning of each chapter.
Maneesha’s questions are read by Osho in the discourse.
Discourses are now finished with the words:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes Bhagwan.
Can we celebrate now?
YES!”
(And variations thereof)
Zen sutras, anecdotes and masters quoted: Tozan (two discourses), Kassan, Ummon (five discourses), Kyozan, Sekishitsu, Dokin, Dorin, Seppo (two discourses), Massan Ryonen, Sekito (two discourses), Nanyo, Gensha, Joshu (three discourses), Hogen, Tanka, Razan, Kinzan (two discourses), Ganto, Banzan, Baso, Hofuku, Bokushu, Tendo, Mayoku, Ryuge.
Note to the Reader on pp. x-xi. Same text as in ‘This. This. A Thousand Times This’ (1988).

Introduction by Sw Dharmabodhi (Count Christoph Keyserlingk):
“For more then twelve years I have listened to Bhagwan almost every day. When He was in silence, or I could not be with Him, I listened to tapes of His discourses or read his books. For me, it is therefore an extraordinary phenomenon that I sit with Him in Buddha Hall in Poona and I am still thrilled and excited by His words. Of course the words alone are a small part of what is happening; they are only the surface. But the surface is already beautiful; it carries the atmosphere of that incredible presence – or rather no-presence – which is Bhagwan.
Even in His words He expresses a glimpse of what He says is inexpressible: the melting of our inner emptiness with the whole existence. From every possible angle, He shows us that such an experience is there for everybody, that it is nothing special, we only have to go in.
He is such a Master that meditation becomes fun, happens while we laugh, go crazy, move to the music, or listen to Him as He brings understanding into these absurd Zen anecdotes.
And the title of the book becomes reality.
During all these fifteen days we hear the solitary cuckoo, singing as if she is in dialogue with Bhagwan. Her voice can be heard, clear and distinctive, in the gaps between His words. Existence seems to be in tune, in the bird and in Bhagwan… and just when I feel that it is only me who struggles to tune in too, who is caught somewhere in the middle, not a bird anymore but not yet in tune with my innermost being, Bhagwan raises his Zen stick to bring it home to me.
You are it, you are in tune, you have only forgotten it. The loving song of Bhagwan and the bird, and the categorical uniqueness of these anecdotes, touch my heart. And my heart touched, it gives me courage again and again to relax, to go in a little, to allow whatever wants to be there. A trust arises that if the same life-source is everywhere, in Bhagwan, in the cuckoo… why not inside myself too?
To sit in the presence of Bhagwan is to be where Zen is lived again as pure meditation, to hear – and yes, to experience – that: “Zen requires no rituals. Just be as you are – the only experiment is to go in and discover your eternal self.” Sw Dharmabodhi. Count Christoph Keyserlingk. (pp. viii-ix)

First discourse, ‘The Way of the Birds’, 27.06.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, the bird flying across the sky leaves no footprints. This is called the Way of the Birds – simply disappearing into the nothingness of the sky, without a trace behind. Zen wants you to be just like the Birds’ Way – a nobody, a nothingness.
It is strange but true that in your nothingness you are for the first time born. The nothingness is the womb out of which your spiritual heights are revealed.
Just as you cannot follow the bird because he leaves no footprints, the buddha also leaves no footprints. You cannot follow a buddha for the simple reason that you are a buddha; you have just forgotten it. And once you try to follow a buddha, you are going astray.
Those who make footprints behind themselves – create organized religions, give commandments for the coming future, scriptures to be followed by those who have not come yet – are all engaged in nonreligious activity.
Religion is a rebellion – rebellion against following. This is a religious place. You are not my followers. You can love me, I can love you… Following means a subtle spiritual slavery. I don’t have any follower and I don’t want anybody to be a follower of anybody else either. The moment you start following someone, you are going to miss yourself. You will be lost in dark nights and dark clouds and it will become more and more difficult to find the way back home.” (p. 3)

* Zen: The Diamond Thunderbolt. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Volume 5 of 5 in boxed set (The World of Zen). Editor: Sw Deva Ashik. Introduction: Sw Deva Ashik. Design: Sw Shivananda. Photography: Sw Shivananda. Sw Samarpan Avikal. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Typing: Ma Anand Nilima. Sw Ashutosh. Typesetting: Ma Premo. Production: Sw Deva Anugito. Sw Prem Prabodh. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1988 (no year). First edition. 276 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos and color paintings on jacket. Hardcover. Size: 19,5×12 cm. Weight: 345 g. ISBN 3-89338-043-4. Period: 12.07 pm – 24.07 pm 1988. 13 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Foreign Language Editions. Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Bhagwan. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
Before title page: Dedicated to the clouds as the symbol of freedom.
Sutras read by Maneesha are at the beginning of each chapter.
Maneesha’s questions are read by Osho in the discourse.
Discourses are now finished with the words:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes Bhagwan.
Can we celebrate now?
YES!”
(And variations thereof)
Zen sutras, anecdotes and masters quoted: Bokushu (three chapters), Ummon (two chapters), Nan-yin, Yakusan, Tokusan (two chapters), Isan, Nansen, Mayaoku, Joshu (two chapters), Kyogen, Sekiso, Sozan (two chapters), Tozan (three chapters), Wu Tzu, Doyo, Emyo, Jozan, Hakuyo, Kyosei, Dogen, Keizan, Yakusan, Ryuzan,
Note to the Reader on pp. x-xi. Same text as in ‘This. This. A Thousand Times This’ (1988).

Introduction by Sw Deva Ashik:
“…It is the diamond thunderbolt. It is a sudden experience, with no preparation, no rehearsal, no discipline, no path. Suddenly you open your eyes as if a thunderbolt has hit you and the sleep of millions of years is broken. In that awakening you know the mystery of existence.”
A modern man picking up a book of Zen anecdotes may be excused for wondering what this “sudden experience” might be. We read of monks attaining to the culmination of a lifetime’s striving in the most mundane and unexpected ways.
“One day as he stood beside a cowpen, he suddenly had an insight.”
“One day, as he was setting out his bowl, he suddenly attained enlightenment.”
“At these words, Gazan was greatly enlightened.”
Bhagwan gives an example from an earlier time:
“Lao Tzu was sitting under a tree when an old leaf fell, just wavering; and he watched the leaf falling down from the tree, and he became enlightened. Now you can sit under any tree and you can watch thousand of leaves dropping, and you will come back home as much of an idiot as you were before, because the falling of the leaf has nothing to do with enlightenment. Lao Tzu was meditating under that tree, and his meditation was ready – any slight opportunity for opening the inner lotus, and the immense experience will explode.”
Zen means, literally, meditation, and the discourses in this book are Zen brought to life. They each contain a classic story from the early days of Zen, but the telling of the story is just the beginning.
“Zen anecdotes are not something to read. As far as reading is concerned, they are worthless. They are something to be lived, that is the only way to understand them… you have to listen not with your ears but with your heart; not with your mind but with your silent being.”
The sudden experience lies in wait – in the anecdote, in Bhagwan’s effortless exploration of it, and in the exercise which follows the “few laughters” at the end. Instead of the sudden shout of “Kwatz!” or the thwack of Zen staff on shaven head, Bhagwan gives a signal and Nivedano strikes the surdo, a Brazilian drum as big as a winecask. Seven thousand consciousnesses start inwards down the hidden road, first in vocal madness and then in silence, deeper than any on earth, a silence in which buddhas can glimpse themselves.
This book brings a taste of that silence to you.
Words, words, words;
fluttering drizzle and snow.
Silence, silence, silence;
a roaring thunderbolt.”
Sw Deva Ashik, M.A. (Oxon.) (pp. viii-ix)

First discourse, ‘The Whiskers of the Pebble’, 12.07.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, Zen is so strange as far as intellectual understanding is concerned. It looks almost absurd. That is one of the reasons why it has not grown into a vast tree around the world, but has remained a small stream of only those who can see beyond the mind, who can feel it, even though it is illogical, irrational.
Once Picasso was sitting in his garden with a beautiful rosebush; many roses had blossomed on it. A friend asked him, “What is the meaning of the roses?”
Picasso said, “There is no meaning in anything at all, but there is immense significance in even the smallest piece of grass.”
You have to understand these two words, ‘meaning’ and ‘significance’. In the dictionary they have the same meaning, but in existence, in life, in truth, they are from different sources. Meaning is of the mind, and significance is of the no-mind. Meaning is utilitarian, the bicycle has a meaning, but a roseflower? – it is utterly meaningless.
But does the bicycle have any significance? The roseflower has immense significance, a great grandeur, just look at the flower and its beauty and its impossibility. Out of earth comes such a phenomenal, beautiful, fragrant rose for nobody in particular, but it spreads its fragrance to the whole universe. It is for anybody who is receptive.
The concern of philosophy is meaning, and the concern of Zen is significance. Meaning has always to be rational, significance has no such bondage. What is the meaning of love? It has immense beauty, it has great joy, it is a blessing – but don’t ask the meaning.
Since the days of Gautam Buddha, it has been asked again and again by Buddhist monks, “What is the meaning of Buddhism?”
Just by their question they have missed. A wrong question cannot provoke a right answer.
Keeping this in your view, meditate on these small anecdotes.” (p. 3)

* Dogen. The Zen Master. A Search and a Fulfillment. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Volume 1 of 7 in boxed set (Osho Rajneesh The Present Day Awakened One speaks on the Ancient Masters of Zen). Editor: Sw Anand Burt. Introduction: Ma Deva Prashanta. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Photography: Sw Svatantra Sarjano. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Sw Prem Prabodh. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 203 pages. Illustrated with photos, etchings and color paintings. Hardcover. Size: 21×14,5 cm. Weight: 360 g. ISBN 3-89338-063-9. Period: 25.07 pm – 01.08 pm 1988. 8 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Books by Osho Rajneesh. English Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Osho Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
On front flap: “Osho Rajneesh The present Day Awakened One Speaks on the Ancient Masters of Zen.”
On title page: Dedicated to the Full Moons.
About the Author on pp. 182-185. Excerpt:
“His talks to disciples and seekers from all over the world have been published in more than six hundred fifty volumes, and translated into over thirty languages. And he says, “My message is not a doctrine, not a philosophy. My message is a certain alchemy, a science of transformation, so only those who are willing to die as they are and be born again into something so new that they cannot even imagine it right now… only those few courageous people will be ready to listen, because listening is going to be risky. Listening, you have taken the first step towards being reborn. So it is not a philosophy that you can just make an overcoat of and go bragging about. It is not a doctrine where you can find consolation for harassing questions… No, my message is not some verbal communication. It is far more risky. It is nothing less than death and rebirth.” (p. 184)
Before Appendix: Four full page etchings.
Maneesha’s question is read by Osho at start of discourse.
Discourses are now finished with the words:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes Bhagwan.
Can we celebrate the ten thousand buddhas??
Yes, Beloved Master.”
(And variations thereof)

After Introduction follows Note to the Reader:
“The end of each discourse in this series follows a certain format which might be puzzling to the reader who has not been present at the event itself.
First is the time of Sardar Gurudayal Singh. “Sardarji” is a longtime disciple whose hearty and infectious laughter has resulted in the joke-telling time being named in his honor.
The jokes are followed by a meditation consisting of four parts. Each stage of the meditation is preceded by a signal from Osho to the drummer, Nivedano. This drumbeat is represented in the text as follows:
[etched picture]
The first stage is gibberish, which Osho has described as “cleansing your mind of all kinds of dust… speaking any language that you don’t know… throwing all your craziness out.” For several moments, the hall goes completely mad, as thousands of people shout, scream, babble nonsense and wave their arms about. The gibberish is represented in the text as follows:
[another etched picture]
The second stage is a period of silent sitting, of focusing the consciousness on the center, the point of witnessing.
The third stage is let-go – each person falls effortlessly to the ground, allowing themselves to dissolve the boundaries that keep them separate.
A final drumbeat signals the assembly to return to a sitting position, as they are guided in making their experience of meditation more and more a part of everyday life. The participants are guided through each stage of the meditation by the words of the Master, and the entire text of each evening meditation is reproduced here.” (pp. x-xi)

Introduction by Ma Deva Prashanta:
“There is only one ultimate experience, but there are thousands of expressions of it – there is only one moon, but thousands of reflections of it: in every dewdrop sliding across a lotus leaf, in every pool. Ripples and waves may break the reflections, but when stillness returns the reflections is seen again.
Osho Rajneesh uses this beautiful and evocative metaphor to help explain enlightenment the Zen way, in this series of discourses about the unique Zen master Dogen. Dogen was a child of genius, never satisfied with borrowed knowledge. His journey from child to man, from scholar to enlightened master is traced through these sutras by Osho Rajneesh.
In his search for the truth, Dogen soared high and eventually reached the ultimate peaks that have no beginning and no end. Like a breeze disappearing in the air, or a dewdrop merging with the ocean, Dogen merged with the formless, with the changeless.
Illuminating this tremendous journey with stories and incredibly beautiful haikus, Osho Rajneesh reminds us that the ultimate experience can be ours. Neither age nor birth, nor country nor race is of any importance – only awareness matters. The ultimate experience is so subtle that we have to be utterly silent to catch it. No special discipline is needed, no special situation, just the silence of being settled at the very center of our being.
We are all part of a tremendous mystery, and must catch hold of it today. Tomorrow may be too late.” Ma Deva Prashanta. (No page number)

First discourse, ‘To Study the Way… To Forget the Self…’, 25.07.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, this is the first day of a new series of talks, devoted to the full moons. The moon is an ancient symbol of transforming the hot rays of the sun into cool, peaceful, beautiful rays. It has nothing of its own. When you see the moon, you are seeing only a mirror which is reflecting the rays of the sun. Those reflected rays are just like the ones you can see when the sun is reflected in a river.
The moon is a mirror but not only a mirror, it is also a transforming agent. It changes the heat into cool, peaceful rays. That is the reason why the moon has become the most significant symbol in the East.
This series is dedicated to the full moons. In the series itself we are going to discuss one of the most unique masters, Dogen.
Before I enter into the sutras, it will be good for you to know something about Dogen. That background will help you to understand his very condensed sutras. Apparently they look contradictory. Without the background of Dogen’s life pattern they are like trees without roots, they cannot bring flowers. So first I will talk about Dogen’s life structure.” (p. 2)

* The Miracle. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Volume 1 of 5 in boxed set (Zen. All the Colors of the Rainbow). Editor: Sw Anand Burt. Introduction: Sw Satyam Anando. Design: Sw Shivananda. Photography: Sw Navajata. Ma Kamadevi. Ma Prem Diwani. Sw Veet Ateet. Sw Samarpan Avikal. Sw Anand Satyam. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Calligraphy: Sw Bhaven. Typesetting: Ma Premo. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Sw Prem Prabodh. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 273 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos and color painting on jacket. Hardcover. Size: 19,5×12 cm. Weight: 335 g. ISBN 3-89338-053-1. Period: 02.08 pm – 11.08 pm 1988. 10 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Osho Rajneesh. English Language Editions. Foreign Language Editions. Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Osho Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
In this series ‘Zen. All the Colors of the Rainbow’ no dedications are mentioned in the volumes.
On spine and jacket: Talks on Zen.
Zen sutras, anecdotes and masters quoted: Otsu, Rinzai (three discourses), Dogen (three discourses), Seigen, Yun-Men; Ejaku, Eno.
‘Note to the Reader’ (pp. xii-xiii) is identical to text in ‘This. This’ (1988).

On back flap in a frame is Osho’s name change as first mentioned in ‘Om Mani Padme Hum’ (1989), now in this version:
“On January 7, 1989
Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh announced
that He was dropping the prefix
BHAGWAN SHREE
because to many people
it means ‘God.’
On Febuary 27, 1989,
sannyasins collectively
decided to call Him:
OSHO RAJNEESH.
“OSHO” is a term derived
from ancient Japanese,
and was first used by Eka,
to address his master, Bodhidharma.
‘O’ means “with great respect, love
and gratitude” as well as
“synchronicity” and “harmony.”
‘SHO’ means “multidimensional
expansion of consciousness”
and “existence showering from
all directions.”
Ma Prem Hasya
President
Rajneesh Foundation International.

Introduction by Sw Satyam Anando:
“Moving deeper into meditation, we discover that what we thought was the fresh air of the real world is just the endless exhaust of our obsessions.
We walk through life in a hall of mirrors and everything we see is a reflection of our fears, rages and madness.
Every night in Poona, India, Osho Rajneesh takes thousands of people through the mirrors into the miracles.
With words and silences, and without the slightest shatter, he dissolves glass walls and transports those ready for the journey into an original realm which feels like a perpetual first time.
You can call this spacious, tasty and pure world, where Osho Rajneesh lives 24 hours a day, the center of existence. You can call it home.
Gathered on these pages are snapshots of those voyages – Osho Rajneesh discoursing on live Zen. Masters with strange sounding names and even stranger sounding behavior ask disciples weird questions and then bash them for wrong and even right answers. Lions roar, single hands are heard clapping, frogs go plop in ancient ponds, and the original face is seen shimmering in the void of No-Mind, No-Buddha, No-Knowing.
Innocence.
Inner sense.
Yes, Zen is the sixth sense which takes us in. The great game that Zen masters play with each other and their disciples would be as indecipherable as cricket were it not for Osho Rajneesh’s wisdom and wizardry. He explains the rules and we get a disciple’s-eye view of Bodhidharma’s ferocious face.
Be careful. Don’t get too far away from the Zen stick.” Sw Satyam Anando. Poona, 1989. (No page number)

First discourse, ‘How Full, Emptiness!’, 02.08.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, there are four possible ways to explain the unexplainable. Unconsciously, man has made philosophies out of those four ways.
Man is a crossroads, where four ways meet. The first way is that of matter. The atheist takes that road, the scientist takes that road: “Man is nothing but matter.” From the days of the Charvakas to the days of Bertrand Russell, there have been great, eminent thinkers who have chosen that path. and almost half of the world today is on that path, because communism does not believe in anything else but matter – mind is only a epiphenomenon. Epiphenomenon means just a shadow: when the man disappears, the shadow disappears. There is nothing beyond death, and there is nothing before birth. You are complete between birth and death; that’s all you have.
The second road defines man as a duality between matter and mind. Most of the philosophers of the world have chosen that definition because it seems completely rational. All that we know about man is that his body consists of matter, and we know that he has thoughts which are not material. These things can be observed from outside. Hence, man is basically matter with an addition of a shadow that is his mind. As the body dies, mind also dies. On this path also, life extends only between birth and death.
The third possibility, which has been accepted by all religions, is that man is not just matter or just mind; he is also a soul. Matter is his outer expression, soul is his inner expression, and mind functions as a bridge between the two. On the third path there is a possibility of a life beyond death. The people who have accepted it have created on this foundation the idea of reincarnation: birth after birth, one changes houses but the essential soul remains.
Zen has a fourth standpoint. Man is not matter, although he is covered with matter. He is not mind, although he is covered with mind. Nor is he an individual soul. He is a pure nothingness. Man, from this fourth standpoint, which is the standpoint of Zen, is almost like an onion. You go on peeling it, one layer after another layer, hoping that you are going to find something. Finally, when you have peeled all the layers off, your hands are full of emptiness; nothing is left. The onion was only layers and layers and layers. Behind those layers was emptiness, nothingness, which will not be visible to the eyes, which will not be tangible to the hands.
Zen has taken the ultimate standpoint about man, you cannot go beyond that. Here ends the whole journey, the pilgrimage of the seeker.” (p. 3)

* Turning In. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Volume 2 of 5 in boxed set (Zen. All the Colors of the Rainbow). Editor: Ma Yogi Sudha. Introduction: Sw Prem Sushil. Design: Sw Deva Anugito. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Typesetting: Ma Premo. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Sw Prem Prabodh. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 241 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos and color painting on jacket. Hardcover. Size: 19,5×12 cm. Weight: 305 g. ISBN 3-89338-059-0. Period: 12.08 pm – 28.08 pm 1988. 8 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Osho Rajneesh. English Language Editions. Foreign Language Editions. Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Osho Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
On back flap in a frame is Osho’s name change as mentioned in ‘The Miracle’ (1989).
On spine and jacket: Talks on Zen.
Zen sutras, anecdotes and masters quoted: Ryusui, Eno, Rinzai, Daikaku (three discourses), Hakuin.
‘Note to the Reader’ (pp. xii-xiii) is identical to text in ‘This. This’ (1988).

Introduction by Sw Prem Sushil:
“Outrageous (adj 1 a: exceeding the limits of what is usual)
This book is a journey into the world of Zen, but be forewarned this world fits the above definition. His outrageousness makes it difficult to describe; it’s easier to say what it is not than to say what it is. It’s not a philosophy nor a school of thought, neither a belief system nor a religion. The precocious child born from the meeting of Buddhism and Taoism, it stands alone, a snow-capped peak, towering above the dogmas and doctrines of the world’s many isms.
The same can be said of Osho Rajneesh. He also stands alone, his vision unique, his expression clear and powerful and yet also outlandish (adj 2: strikingly out of the ordinary). He does not in any way conform to the norms of society. A being so rare, an enlightened man, can not be compared to the common man, but what makes Osho Rajneesh most precious is his ability to share with his listeners a taste of his experience.
For this transmission, Zen is the perfect vehicle. These Zen sutras and haikus come alive in the hands and the words of a living master. Behind the gestures, between the lines, something is communicated from master to disciple; something transpires, something outstanding (adj 3 b: marked by eminence and distinction). Something wonderful.
What these words are pointing to, what all the masters past and present are indicating, is what Zen calls the source, from where you have come, your original face. The master can give a few hints, clues, perhaps a glimpse, but we alone have to experience it for ourselves. And it cannot be felt or found by reaching or looking outwards (adj 1 a: moving… away from a center). It has nothing to do with anything out – only by turning in…” February, 1989. Sw Prem Sushil. (No page number)

First discourse, ‘Emptiness: The Absolute Host’, 12.08.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, Ryusui is pointing to a very fundamental question which Gautam Buddha raised for the first time in human history.
The question is, is enlightenment something to be achieved, desired, longed for? If so, then there must be practices, disciplines, rituals, and the whole paraphernalia. And millions of people have gone astray in search of enlightenment. Buddha is the first human being who has said that everything is absolutely arbitrary because you need not go anywhere. Enlightenment is your very nature.
It is consciousness that you are built with; this house, this body is not you. And this mind also is not you. And there is not much problem to stand aside and watch the mind and its functioning, to stand aside and watch the gestures of the body. This watcher is your reality, your truth. It is already here, so don’t go in search somewhere else. Whenever, whereever you find it, you will always find it here and now. Now is the time and here is the space. If you can be now here, you are a Gautama Buddha.” (p. 3)

* The Original Man. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Volume 3 of 5 in boxed set (Zen. All the Colors of the Rainbow). Editor: Ma Dhyan Sagar. Introduction: Ma Dhyan Sagar. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Typesetting: Ma Rashmi Bharti. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Sw Prem Prabodh. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 241 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos and color painting on jacket. Hardcover. Size: 19,5×12 cm. Weight: 320 g. ISBN 3-89338-056-6. Period: 16.08 pm – 25.08 pm 1988. 9 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Osho Rajneesh. English Language Editions. Foreign Language Editions. Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Osho Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
On back flap in a frame is Osho’s name change as mentioned in ‘The Miracle’ (1989).
On spine and jacket: Talks on Zen.
Anando is reading the sutras in chapters 1-7, Maneesha again in chapters 8-9.
Zen sutras, anecdotes and masters quoted: Basui (three chapters), Rinzai (two chapters), Shoitsu, Dokai, Manzan, Tozan.
‘Note to the Reader’ (pp. xi-xii) is identical to text in ‘This. This’ (1988).

Introduction by Ma Dhyan Sagar:
“To try to describe what it’s like sitting with the enlightened master Osho Rajneesh, is well-nigh impossible! In His presence it seems like the senses become so refined – “indulged” with a quality beyond pleasure, beyond excitement. During the nightly talks He gives in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium in Poona the atmosphere is one in which time is not measured.
This book is an attempt to capture those precious moments during the month of August, 1988 – nine evenings with a blessed one.
As you read and enjoy His mastery of words, their poetry, music and pictures – Zen at its peak – don’t forget to savor the unspoken magic and mystery of what lies between the lines, between each word.
“If you understand those pauses, those moments of silence, those gaps between two words, no dictionary is needed. No dictionary can manage to explain those gaps, those intervals. The wordless is my real message. Catch those wordless moments. I am there, and you will find yourself also there.”
To try to explain such a master of masters to the average person is well-nigh impossible, but somehow Osho Rajneesh attracts those who don’t settle for being “just average.” So take a few hours to enter that place inside where time is not measured, to taste the no-past, no-future eternity, the unknown that you know so well. Take a sip from an abundant lake of enlightenment. This book is a challenge to go beyond the skin deep and let your original man loose.
“If you can find your original man, you have found everything that this existence contains – all the splendor, all the glory, all the ceremony, all the joy.” ‘From the False to the Truth’. 17th July, 1985.” Ma Dhyan Sagar. Poona, March 1989. (No page number)

First discourse, ’You Simply Are’, 16.08.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Anando, Basui is apparently right, but there are possibilities that the enlightened man can create devices for the unenlightened. It is certainly one of the most impossible jobs, to talk to a sleeping man or to enter in somebody’s dreams. But I say that Basui is only relatively true, because I constantly enter into your dreams. There will be many witnesses for it.
He is saying:
Imagine a child sleeping next to its parents and dreaming it is being beaten or is painfully sick. The parents cannot help the child, no matter how much it suffers, for no one can enter the dreaming mind of another.
There is no need to enter anybody’s dreaming mind.
By chance Anando is here to read the sutras instead of serious Maneesha.
(The Master reaches towards Anando, His hands furiously quivering in a “remote-control” tickle. Anando, totally taken by surprise, collapses into uncontrollable laughter. Much taken by the infectious giggling, the Master then decides to tickle everyone, and for a few golden moments, ripples of tickling and laughter fill the auditorium.)
The parents can do at least this much: they can tickle the child. No need to enter into his dreams, just wake him up. Existence manages so beautifully… that Maneesha is absent, by chance, and the right child is sleeping in front of me. And you can see, not only can I tickle her, the tickle spreads all over. Even the children of the neighbourhood will be awakened.!” (p. 3)

* The Language of Existence. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Volume 4 of 5 in boxed set (Zen. All the Colors of the Rainbow). Editor: Ma Shivam Suvarma. Introduction: Ma Dhyan Kavita. Design: Sw Shivananda. Photography: Sw Navajata. Ma Kamadevi. Ma Prem Diwani. Sw Veet Ateet. Sw Samarpan Avikal. Sw Anand Satyam. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Typesetting: Ma Anand Disha. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Sw Prem Prabodh. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 239 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos and color painting on jacket. Hardcover. Size: 19,5×12 cm. Weight: 305 g. ISBN 3-89338-054-X. Period: 29.08 pm – 07.09 pm 1988. 9 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Osho Rajneesh. English Language Editions. Foreign Language Editions. Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Osho Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
On back flap in a frame is Osho’s name change as mentioned in ‘The Miracle’ (1989).
On spine and jacket: Talks on Zen.
Zen sutras, anecdotes and masters quoted: Daio, Hakuin, Rinzai (two chapters), Bukko (two chapters), Torei, Bankei, Tozan.
‘Note to the Reader’ (pp. xiv-xv) is identical to text in ‘This. This’ (1988).

Introduction by Ma Dhyan Kavita:
“Zen – language of existence.
Zen – language of the birds, the trees, the sky, the stars.
Still, cool night: soft, quiet, gentle.
Creak of bamboo, shadow of frog.
Perfect moment.
Incomparable master:
invisible transmission,
mirror reflecting, no judgement.
Simplicity of hearts meeting, invisible,
beyond words.
Overflowing love, spontaneous laughter.
No mind, no ripple stirs, no dust gathers.
Dewdrop in the ocean.
Radiant beings in the presence of eternity.
Delicate, graceful form.
Words.
Being.
Imparted to disciples.”
Ma Dhyan Kavita. Poona, India. March, 1989. (No page number(

First discourse, Remember, ‘Remember’, 29.08.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, before I discuss these very significant statements, I have to inaugurate Avirbhava’s Museum of Gods. She has brought a few great gods, but before she brings her gods before you I have to say something about them [octopus, crocodile and lobster]…
The fact is, you cannot travel on anybody’s road because that road will never lead you to yourself. it will lead you to somebody else, whose road it is. Never be a follower; always be a path finder. And the path in the unknown reality of your inner world is made by walking into the unknown, without any road prepared by others for you.
All the religions are doing that: they are preparing roads for millions of people – highways, super highways. There are six hundred million Catholics walking on one road. They are not going reach anywhere; not a single one of them has reached even to the state of Jesus Christ. And nobody even thinks about it. Six hundred million Catholics for eighteen hundred years following a certain road persistently, and they have not produced a single Jesus worth the name. It is not their fault, it is our whole mental backup. We have been told that we have to walk on paths which are prepared. But this is a different path.
All paths that go outwards are prepared before-hand. You can go to the north, you can go to the south; you can go anywhere, the road is ready. But to go inside, no road is ready, you will have to create it by walking. It will remain always an individual pathway. Nobody else will ever walk on it and nobody else should ever walk on it, because that will lead him into hypocrisy. He will become someone else that he is not. It is a very important message.” (pp. 4,7)

* The Buddha. The Emptiness of the Heart. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Volume 5 of 5 in boxed set (Zen. All the Colors of the Rainbow). Editor: Ma Deva Sarito. Introduction: Ma Prem Prartho. Design: Sw Shivananda. Cover photograph: Sw Samarpan Avikal. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Typesetting: Ma Premo. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Sw Prem Prabodh. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 239 pages. Illustrated with etchings and color painting on jacket. Hardcover. Size: 19,5×12 cm. Weight: 305 g. ISBN 3-89338-055-8. Period: 08.09 pm – 15.09 pm 1988. 8 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Osho Rajneesh. English Language Editions. Foreign Language Editions. Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Osho Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
On back flap in a frame is Osho’s name change as mentioned in ‘The Miracle’ (1989).
On spine and jacket: Talks on Zen.
Zen sutras, anecdotes and masters quoted: Bukko (two chapters), Daikaku, Bankei, Rinzai, Daio, Shoitsu, Engo.
‘Note to the Reader’ (pp. xiv-xv) is identical to text in ‘This. This’ (1988).

Introduction by Ma Prem Prartho:
“This book describes a forgotten land; its words are of a forgotten language. In order to hear them, the ears need to be turned in a new direction; one needs to open the ears’ back doors.
And then it is though someone inside our very heart is standing on a mountain peak describing the view, the coolness of the air, the fragrance of the flowers, the silence of the moon.
The voice which speaks to us here seems to be the small voice of someone calling from far away. He describes spaces which seem so distant from where we have lived our lives, but often bells sound between the words – those bells which ring in us when a forgotten truth is awakened.
And in truth, the one calling and what is described are hauntingly familiar. Deeper into this book, we begin to suspect that perhaps we even lived here once – we once knew these spaces as home. And perhaps this land is not really so far away after all – we seem to be stumbling upon it in these very moments.
The small voice in this book tells us that a being is waiting inside us, buried in the dust of thought and the heart’s clutter. In every way we are urged to clear the mind, empty the heart, and discover who lives here – who is calling from these cool inner peaks.
Open the ears’ back doors and listen.
Listen to this magical language and listen for the bells which ring so joyously in the gaps. Perhaps it is your very own buddha pulling the bell robes – a bell which tolls for thee:
“Your own being is so pure, so unpolluted, not even a particle of dust has ever reached there – cannot reach. Only your consciousness can reach there, and consciousness arises in you with no-mind. With no-mind you become so wakeful, so watchful – nowhere to go outside, because all thoughts are gone. So you turn inwards, and for the first time face your own original being.” Ma Prem Prartho. March, 1989. Poona, India. (No page number)

First discourse, ‘The Emptiness of the Heart’, 08.09.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, Bukko has come to the ultimate expression of the experience of one’s own being. Very rarely has a master succeeded to such a point as Bukko has in his statements. Listen carefully, because rarely will you meet a Bukko again.
Bukko said:
Taking things easily and without forcing, after some time the rush of thought, outward and inward, subsides naturally, and the true face shows itself.
That’s what I have been telling you. To be a buddha is not a difficult job. It is not some achievement for which you need a Nobel Prize. It is the easiest thing in the world, because it has already happened without your knowing.
The buddha is already breathing in you. Just a little recognition, just a little turning inwards… and that has not to be done forcibly. If you do it forcibly you will miss the point. it is very delicate. You have to look inward playfully, not seriously. That’s what he means by “taking things easily.” Don’t take anything seriously.” (p. 4)

* Ma Tzu. The Empty Mirror. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Volume 2 of 7 in boxed set (Osho Rajneesh The Present Day Awakened One speaks on the Ancient Masters of Zen). Editor: Sw Deva Ashik. Sw Krishna Prabhu. Introduction: Ma Deva Sarito. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Cover design: Sw Dhyan Suryam. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 202 pages. Illustrated with etchings and color paintings. Hardcover. Size: 21×14,5 cm. Weight: 360 g. ISBN 3-89338-065-5. Period: 16.09 pm – 25.09 pm 1988. 10 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Books by Osho Rajneesh. English Language Editions. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Osho Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
Dedicated to Sw Sardar Gurudayal Singh – the only man in the world who laughs before the joke is told. What a trust.
‘Note to the Reader’ (pp. xiii-xiv) is identical to text in ‘Dogen. The Zen Master’ (1989), yet with a different design of symbols to indicate the various phases in meditation at the end of each discourse.
Maneesha’s question is read by Osho in the discourse.
Discourses are now finished:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes Bhagwan.
Can we celebrate the ten thousand buddhas??
Yes, Beloved Master.”
(And variations thereof)

Introduction by Ma Deva Sarito:
“I have called this series Ma Tzu: The Empty Mirror for the simple reason that his whole teaching is, “Don’t react. Just be, and reflect…”
A simple summary of a simple teaching. Of course, in their simplicity the words are vast and full of implications.
“Don’t react.” Is such a thing really possible? From the very beginning we are trained to react. “No” – and we learn to stop. “Hello” – and we learn to smile. And layers upon layers until we are just a jumble of conditioned reactions that we learn to call “myself.”
Which brings us to, “Just be.” Not a very popular idea. Just be what? A doctor, a lawyer, a good citizen? An American, a Japanese, a German? A good worker, a great genius, a famous artist? A Christian, a Buddhist?… No? Well, then what?
“And reflect” – like a mirror, not like the thinking process we have come to associate with the crowd. Clearly, the first two are prerequisite for the third; otherwise the American will continue to react like an American, the doctor will continue to view the world through a doctor’s eyes, the Buddhist will follow his precepts and the Christian will follow Jesus. And we find ourselves back at the beginning of the circle – reacting to everything (yes, everything – even when somebody provokes us and we “don’t react” we are actually most often suppressing a reaction that has already happened inside us) trying to be something, and “reflecting” like mad on what it all means.
And so it goes on. Some of us carry on doing it our whole lives, some of us go crazy, and some of us start searching for a way to jump off the wheel.
Osho Rajneesh is today, like Ma Tzu was in his day, a proof that jumping off the wheel is possible – and a reassurance that it will not, as we fear, bring multiple fractures and death, but rather a new wholeness and life.
Here in these pages you will not find the scholarly commentary which characterizes most books on Zen in the West – books which, in the effort to make Zen comprehensible to the rational mind, destroy its very message and add another layer to the very knowledgeability that Zen aims to strip away. On the contrary, the 6th century Zen master Ma Tzu is not “explained” here – his work is continued and made fresh for the times in which we live. And in talking about Ma Tzu, Osho Rajneesh is talking about himself…
The door cracks open in these pages, a glimpse of the other side – off the wheel, where it is possible not to react but just to be, and reflect.” Ma Deva Sarito. Poona, 1989. (No page number)

First discourse, ‘The Mirror’, 16.09.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, we are starting a new series of talks: ‘Ma Tzu – The Empty Mirror’. Ma Tzu is also known as Baso. I am not using the name Baso, because our second series is going to be on the Japanese Basho – the great mystic poet of Zen. And the name Ma Tzu is itself more meaningful than his popular name, Baso.
Before I discuss the sutras, a biographical note on Ma Tzu is absolutely needed, because he is not known to the world. He is one of those unfortunate geniuses whom the world tries in every way to ignore, to forget that they even exist. Even the idea that they exist hurts the ego of the crowd. It has been doing harm to every genius, because the very existence of a genius reduces you to a retarded being. Every enlightened master is evidence that you are living in darkness, that you have to transform your darkness into life, into light.
It seems to be such a great task – it is not, but it appears to be a great task – to transform your blindness into clear perceptive eyes; to transform your darkness into beautiful morning light. It is a simple thing, the simplest in the world, but just because it is simple, it does not appeal to the mind. Mind is interested in doing great things. The desire behind every ambition of the mind is to be special. And you can be special only with special achievements.
The problem with Zen is that it wants you to be utterly simple, not special. It goes against the very desire of the mind, which is not a small phenomenon – it is a four-million-years-old desire, which everybody is carrying in different lives. Mind cannot understand why you should be simple when you could be special, why you should be humble when you could be powerful. And mind is heavy, it has the great weight of the past. The moment the mind sees anyone humble, simple, natural, a buddha, it immediately condemns him, because such a man goes against the whole makeup of the human mind.
And in a way the mind is right. To be a buddha you will have to drop the mind completely, you will have to become an empty mirror.” (p. 4)

* Hyakujo. The Everest of Zen with Basho’s Haikus. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Volume 3 of 7 in boxed set (Osho Rajneesh The Present Day Awakened One speaks on the Ancient Masters of Zen). Editor: Ma Dhyan Sagar. Introduction: Ma Dhyan Sagar. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Sw Dhyan Suryam. Photography: Sw Anand Prabhar. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 204 pages. Illustrated with etchings and color paintings. Hardcover. Size: 21×14,5 cm. Weight: 360 g. ISBN 3-89338-066-3. Period: 26.09 pm – 04.10 pm 1988. 9 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Books by Osho Rajneesh. English Language Editions. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Osho Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
Dedicated to Anando who has gone astray and come back home.
‘Note to the Reader’ (pp. xi-xii) is identical to text in ‘Dogen. The Zen Master’ (1989), with a different design of symbols to indicate the various phases in meditation at the end of each discourse.
Maneesha’s question is read by Osho in the discourse.
Discourses are now finished:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes Bhagwan.
Can we celebrate the ten thousand buddhas??
Yes, Beloved Master.”
(And variations thereof)

Introduction by Ma Dhyan Sagar:
Reprinted here is the story on a Chinese emperor, his painter and their disappearing on a path into the painting. From: ‘Satyam – Shivam – Sundram’ (1988). November 7, 1987. Also in: ‘Isan. No Footprints in the Blue Sky’ (1989, pp. 44-45). Then follows:
“To read this book is to accept the outstretched hand of the enlightened master, Osho Rajneesh – to set out on “a golden path reaching to your very center.” Ma Dhyan Sagar, B.A. (p. x)

First discourse, ‘The Language of Suddenness’, 26.09.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, before I speak on the sutras of Hyakujo, I have to say a few words as a preface.
‘Hyakujo was the direct heir of Ma Tzu and became most well known for his establishment of the first truly Zen monasteries and his treatise on sudden enlightenment.’
To understand Hyakujo, the first thing is to understand that enlightenment can only be sudden. The preparation can be gradual, but the illumination is going to be sudden. You can prepare the ground for the seeds, but the sprouts will come suddenly one day in the morning; they don’t come gradually. Existence believes in suddenness. Nothing is gradual here, although everything appears to be gradual; that is our illusion…
This appearance is not going to be gradual, not partial. Hyakujo’s great contribution was the sudden enlightenment, because it is so illogical. If you go from here to the market, you have to go – not like the monkey god of Hindus, flying in the sky, carrying a mountain, jumping from one mountain to another mountain… You will have to go step by step. You will have to move gradually. You cannot simply disappear from Buddha Auditorium and find yourself in the M.G. Road marketplace.
In our actual life we never come across anything sudden: you never see the bud of a rose suddenly becoming a flower; it opens gradually. In the morning it was a bud, in the evening it becomes the flower. Because of the continuous experience of gradualness, the major masters of Zen belonged to the gradual school. To them it was absolutely absurd that you can become a buddha instantaneously, just now.
Everything needs time. If you want to prepare a house, a garden, a painting, a poem, it will take time. There is only one thing that does not take time, because it is beyond time, that is your buddhahood. You simply jump out of time and you find yourself as you have been always and will be always – your intrinsic nature.
Hyakujo introduced another thing: Zen monasteries. Before him there were Zen temples – small groups of people living in those temples, meditating, reading scriptures. But he introduced a new thing, the monastery, where people were absolutely devoted to a single-pointed goal: to become the buddha. No scriptures, no rituals… the whole energy had to be poured into a single direction: to discovering your intrinsic nature.
And why monasteries? When there are thousands of people together, going into the unknown, it is easier for you, because you know that although you are going alone into your own space, thousands of others are also going into the same space on their own. You are not absolutely alone. Secondly, a monastery creates a certain atmosphere. That was the greatest contribution of Hyakujo.
A monastery is a climate. Its every fibre, every wave… every leaf of the trees is soaked with only one longing: a great urgency to become the buddha. And when ten thousand people, for years, continuously go on working, it creates an energy field. In that energy field you can be caught, and you can easily slip out of your mind. Alone, it is a little difficult. alone it can happen, it has happened too, but that is not the rule.
Hyakujo’s great insight of introducing monasteries, simply means introducing an energy field which is not visible to you. When ten thousand sannyasins here enter into their inner being, in a way they are alone, but in a way ten thousand people are with them. The experiment is not being done in their cells alone, but in the open, under the sky, with thousands of other people on the same track, creating vibrations, ripples of energy.
Not to become a buddha in such a climate, you would have to struggle against the whole energy field, you would have to swim upstream. But if you want to become a buddha, you simply go with the stream. A deep let-go is possible in that atmosphere. Hyakujo introduced a very scientific concept of monasteries.” (pp. 3-6)

* Nansen. The Point of Departure. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Volume 4 of 7 in boxed set (Osho Rajneesh The Present Day Awakened One speaks on the Ancient Masters of Zen). Editor: Sw Anand Robin. Introduction: Ma Dhyan Sagar. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Sw Anand Robin. Design: Sw Shivananda. Photography: Sw Sat Samudaya. Sw Shivananda. Cover painting: Sw Deva Prashnt. Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 206 pages. Illustrated with photographs and color paintings on cover. Hardcover. Size: 21×14,5 cm. Weight: 360 g. ISBN 3-89338-067-1. Period: 05.10 pm – 14.10 pm 1988. 10 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Books by Osho Rajneesh. English Language Editions. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Osho Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
No dedication.
‘Note to the Reader’ (no pagination) is identical to text in ‘Dogen. The Zen Master’ (1989), with a new graphic design of symbols to indicate the various phases in meditation at the end of each discourse.
Maneesha’s question is read by Osho in the discourse.
Discourses are now finished:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes Bhagwan.
Can we celebrate the ten thousand buddhas??
Yes, Beloved Master.”
(And variations thereof)

Introduction by Sw Anand Robin:
“To read the printed words of Osho Rajneesh’s discourses is to read a manuscript orchestral score, imagining the full experience of public performance. The words are Zen bones, but “if you can penetrate to the very marrow… the whole sky explodes.”
Each talk is part of a full evening of live Zen, which begins with song, dance, and lovers’ greetings, and ends with meditation, prepared for by explosive laughter as the jokes bust our minds before it takes the ‘ten thousand buddhas’ into the ocean deeps of silence.
The discourses are based on anecdotes of the Zen master Nansen, poems of Sekiso, and questions of a disciple. They are the very stuff of Zen. “To anybody it may look like a puzzle, but it is not a puzzle. It is a way of indicating that which is impossible to say… Zen does not complete its sentences; it leaves everything open; it simply gives hints. It is a test of the questioner’s intelligence to complete it.” Osho Rajneesh takes us delicately phrase by phrase through these stories: “although these anecdote seems to be simple it is not so.”
He has called it “The Point of Departure” because He loves the courageous innovator in Nansen, particularly his insistence that the spiritual is not apart from the material. “My love for Nansen is immense because of this understanding… he opened the gate for the first time, making it clear that the sacred and the secular are one, just different ways of seeing. There is no need to torture the body to purify the soul. They both can dance together as sacred a dance as possible… I want the earth and the sky to be together. Only in their togetherness is the wholeness; only in their togetherness is a joy, is a fulfilment.”
But the series is not only penetrated by His love for this radical revolutionary; He takes many opportunities to show the way society, tradition, the past, cripple and enslave us. And how we need again and again to depart from established patterns to feel our true selves in our every action and in the infinite sky. Time and again He laughs at man’s idiot morality, our blind prejudices, hitting us with the Zen stick of His wit and true sight.
The ‘point of departure’ is the thinnest of threads: “Reason is the only thread by which, for the present, you can grasp something of the beyond.” The talks also include further additions to the Museum of Gods – the zoo that man has worshipped – and they include the moment where His poisoned body could no longer dance with us. They are light-hearted and full-hearted, never serious, yet: “Zen masters play… but all this play is always indicative of the eternal and the ultimate.”
These words open doors, but does anybody know to what? Is there anyone there to know? “I have been absent these thirty-five years,” says the soft, strong voice that fills with silence the thousands of seekers. Minds are there – to be teased, provoked, shocked and entertained. Hearts dance with His presence, with the exquisite grace of His every gesture. And inmost beings are nudged, stirred, thrilled like breaking seeds, like green shoots reaching wonderfully for the sun. But here is a mystery school and any mind that wants an explanation has to invent its own.” Sw Anand Robin, M.A. (Cantab.). March 1989. (No page number)

First discourse, ‘The Earth and the Sky are not Separate’, 05.10.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, in the long history of Zen there are milestones. Mahakashyapa is the first, but not much is known about him – in Buddhist scriptures he is mentioned only once. Just one mention and yet he is regarded as the greatest disciple of Gautam Buddha.
For twenty years he has not spoken a single word, no question, just sat by the side of Gautam Buddha. Even Gautam Buddha is concerned: “This is a strange fellow – he has not even said hello; there are thousands of monks, they all come with questions, problems, but this man seems to have no questions.” But in that utter silence, everything happened…
Then the second great departure – there have been many others – but the second great departure from the past is Bodhidharma. He was even more strange than Mahakashyapa. He is the sixth in the line of Zen patriarchs.
After Bodhidharma, Nansen is a new point of departure. He opens Zen to a wider variety, he gives Zen more dimensions. It is no longer a small stream, but becomes an ocean.
Today we are starting a series on Nansen. A little biographical introduction:
‘Nansen, also known as Nan-chuan, was born in North China in 748.
Beginning his study of meditation when a young boy, Nansen became a Buddhist priest at thirty and traveled to various well-known monasteries. On arriving at Chiang-si and meeting with Ma Tzu, Nansen immediately became one of Ma Tzu’s foremost disciples.’
We have discussed Ma Tzu. It is no wonder that a man of the insight of Nansen immediately became… he did not miss a single moment. as he arrived at Ma Tzu’s monastery, as he saw the master, he immediately touched his feet.
And this respect was not one-sided, this love was not one-sided; Ma Tzu showered great love and respect on Nansen. Both saw into each other, something immediately became connected. Ma Tzu understood the urgency and the intensity of the search of Nansen; and Nansen understood, “Here is the man. If I cannot make it with him, I am not going to make it at all.”
This is how disciples and masters meet. It is not a superficial thing; it is something intrinsic, intuitive, and immediate. You have to understand the word ‘immediate’. It is not because of something that Nansen becomes an intimate disciple of Ma Tzu. There is no cause visible. Nothing is mediating him to become the disciple – that is why it is “immediate.” No cause, no visible reason, nothing to be understood by the mind… but heart to heart something has transpired. They have fallen in deep love, the great love.
He realized his enlightenment and later left Ma Tzu’s monastery.
That’s why I have called this series, ‘The Point of Departure’.” (pp. 5, 7)

* Joshu. The Lions’s Roar. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Volume 5 of 7 in boxed set (Osho Rajneesh The Present Day Awakened One speaks on the Ancient Masters of Zen). Editor: Ma Deva Sarito. Introduction: Sw Prem Sushil. Design: Sw Dhyan Jayadip. Cover photograph: Sw Anand Prashanta. Endpaper Photographs: Sw Navajata. Cover painting and drawings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 197 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos and color photos on endpaper. Hardcover. Size: 21×14,5 cm. Weight: 360 g. ISBN 3-89338-068-X. Period: 15.10 pm – 22.10 pm 1988. 8 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Books by Osho Rajneesh. English Language Editions. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Osho Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
No dedication.
“About the author” (pp. 182-185)
‘Note to the Reader’ (no pagination) is identical to text in Dogen. The Zen Master (1989), with a new graphic design format of symbols to indicate the various phases in meditation at the end of each discourse. Including b&w photos from Buddha Hall.
Maneesha’s question is read by Osho in the discourse.
Discourses are now finished:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes, Beloved Master.”

Introduction by Sw Prem Sushil:
“Of all the stories Osho Rajneesh has shared with His disciples through the years this story is surely one of the all time favorites: [Here follows the story about the lion who was brought up together with sheep].
Somewhere deep within us all, the message is heard clearly: we are not living as full a life as we are meant to be. Discontentedly we live on desires, dreams, wanting love and understanding, never reaching. Wondering why a sheep’s life is so empty, boring, unfulfilling.
But then a master comes with soft words or a sudden leap; to shake us up, wake us from our sleep; to take us to his still and silent pool in which we see our true faces reflecting. This has been the work, the play, of all the masters down the ages: to wake us from our dreams. This is the game that Joshu was playing with his disciples eleven hundred years ago. The same game Osho Rajneesh goes on playing with us, today.
In these eight discourses, Osho Rajneessh brings Joshu back to life. Not just by commenting on him or his life, but by being the same kind of man – a master, breathing the essence of Zen. With the ‘whack’ of a Zen stick, the shock of an outrageous joke, or the offer of a cup of tea, Rajneesh and Joshus together are saying, “Wake up, recognize your being.” (pp. ix-xi)

First discourse, ‘Give Him Special Treatment’, 15.10.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, Joshu is one of those exceptional people who become enlightened without any formal initiation. They are nobody’s disciple. It is a very exceptional case. But the story of Joshu is going to be very beautiful. His each statement is so poetic, so pregnant, that unless you listen in utter silence, you will miss its fragrance, its meaning, its penetrating insight into reality.
Joshu is one of the most loved masters in the Zen tradition. There have been great masters, but nobody has been loved so much as Joshu – and he deserved it. His working on people, on disciples, was so soft, so delicate, that only a poet can manage it… a great craftsmanship in carving buddhas out of the stones of humanity.
Every man is just a big rock. . It needs a craftsman, a great artist, a sculptor, who with loving hands removes all that is unessential and leaves only that which is absolutely essential.
That absolutely essential is your buddha.
You will see the working of Joshu and you will fall in love with the man, in this anecdote Maneesha has brought.” (p. 4)

* Rinzai. Master of the Irrational. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Volume 6 of 7 in boxed set (Osho Rajneesh The Present Day Awakened One speaks on the Ancient Masters of Zen). Editor: Sw Krishna Prabhu. Introduction: Ma Shivam Suvarna. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo. Cover photograph: Sw Premgit. Paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Calligraphy: Sw Anand Govind. Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 201 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos and calligraphy on endpaper and chapter headings. Hardcover. Size: 21×14,5 cm. Weight: 360 g. ISBN 3-89338-069-8. Period: 23.10 pm – 31.10 pm 1988. 8 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona.

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Books by Osho Rajneesh. English Language Editions. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Osho Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
No dedication.
Calligraphy explanation on pp. 188-189.
Three b&w photos from Buddha Hall of the ‘Museum of Gods’ on pp. 190-191.
‘Note to the Reader’ (no pagination) is identical to text in ‘Dogen. The Zen Master’ (1989), with calligraphic symbols to indicate the various phases in meditation at the end of each discourse.
Maneesha’s question is read by Osho in the discourse.
Discourses are now finished:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes, Beloved Master.”

Introduction by Ma Shivam Suvarna:
“‘I have heard about a man who died – then he realized that “My God, I was alive!” But now it was too late.’
What a situation we poor human beings are in! Most of us don’t even know that we are alive. We have no conception of the potentials that are buried deep within us. How can we discover all the sources of joy and peace that we have forgotten!
‘Meditation is the only way to make you aware. And once you are fully aware, all around is the ocean of godliness. The very life, the very consciousness is divine.’
Is your life divine, or just mundane? We rarely ask ourselves even the most basic of questions. We are afraid to look ourselves in the face.
‘You are both a circumference and a center. You live on the circumference… As your consciousness becomes deeper, as it becomes an easy thing to go to the center – just as you go in your house and come out – you become a buddha. Then slowly slowly your center starts changing your circumference. Then you cannot be violent, then you cannot be destructive. Then you are love.’
In this book the contemporary Enlightened Master, Osho Rajneesh, speaks on one of the founders of Zen… magical, mysterious anecdotes revealed, with jokes, stories, exquisite haikus, and live meditations. It is a real treat.
Reading this book with an open heart and mind, putting any prejudices aside – you may agree or disagree, it does not matter – you may come to taste the unknown.
‘To be with Rinzai… it has been a beautiful time. To make him our contemporary, just for a few moments, was pure nectar.'” Ma Shivam Suvarna. (No page number)

First discourse, ‘The Master of the Shouts’, 23.10.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, this silent and beautiful evening we are going to start a new series of meditations on the sutras of Rinzai. Rinzai is one of the most loved masters in the tradition of Zen.
The first transmission of the light happened between Gautam Buddha and Mahakaskyapa. The second great transmission happened between Bodhidharma and his successor. Bodhidharma took the ultimate experience of consciousness from India to China; Rinzai introduced the same consciousness, the same path of entering into oneself, from China to Japan.
These three names – Mahakashyapa, Bodhidharma and Rinzai – stand like great peaks of the Himalayas.
One of the most difficult things is to change an experience into explanation, and from one language to another it becomes almost an impossible task. But Bodhidharma managed it, and Rinzai also managed. This transmission of the lamp has to be understood deeply; only then will you be able to understand the sutras that follow.
No language is able to translate an inner experience, a subjective experience, for the simple reason that language is created for the objective world, about things, about people. No language has been created about the innermost center of your being, for the simple reason that when two men of the same experience meet there is no need to say anything. Their very presence, their very silence, the depth of their eyes and the grace of their gestures is enough.” (p. 3)

* Isan. No Footprints in the Blue Sky. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Volume 7 of 7 in boxed set (Osho Rajneesh The Present Day Awakened One speaks on the Ancient Masters of Zen). Editor: Sw Krishna Prabhu. Introduction: Ma Latifa & Sw Dharmamurti. Design: Ma Krishna Gopa. Photography: Sw Navajata. Drawings: Sw Deva Prashant. Ma Krishna Gopa. Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 201 pages. Illustrated with drawings. Hardcover. Size: 21×14,5 cm. Weight: 360 g. ISBN 3-89338-070-1. Period: 01.11 pm – 02.12 pm 1988. 8 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Books by Osho Rajneesh. English Language Editions. Foreign Language Editions. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Osho Rajneesh please contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
No dedication. With drawings of flying birds.
‘About the Author’ pp. 188-190.
‘Note to the Reader’ (no pagination) is identical to text in ‘Dogen. The Zen Master’ (1989) with drawings and new design to indicate the various phases in meditation at the end of each discourse.
Maneesha’s question is read by Osho in the discourse.
Discourses are now finished:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes, Beloved Master.”

Introduction by Ma Latifa and Sw Dharmamurti:
“All our education and upbringing in today’s world is focused on how to leave the biggest footprints behind – how to become rich, powerful or famous, to become immortal by leaving our mark on the outside world. But there is another world, the world of Zen, where only to disappear, to become a nobody, is fulfilment.
Thirteen centuries ago, the Zen master Isan was a very simple man, humble and polite – rather unusual amongst the Zen masters of his time. He was not like Bodhidharma or Ma Tzu, who were hitting their disciples, throwing them out of the window, sending them out of the monastery to find the ultimate. No, he was very patient, waiting with great compassion for anyone who wished to follow.
Thirteen centuries later, the message of Isan comes alive again through the presence of contemporary master Osho Rajneesh. With crystal clarity and humor Osho leads us into the baffling, profound world of Zen. The words give a taste, they tickle the urge to go beyond the words into a vast, incomprehensible silence.
Commenting on Isan, Osho renews the timeless invitation of Zen: “He just fluttered into the sky, attracting those who had forgotten their wings; provoking, challenging those who had forgotten their sky, their freedom. Then he disappears into the faraway sky, into the blueness, leaving no footprints but leaving a tremendous urge to go to those dimensions where you are no more.
“The new man is ready to be born within you… it just needs a little more witnessing. Witnessing is nourishment to the buddha in you.” Ma Latifa. Sw Dharmamurti, B.A. March 1989, Poona. (No page number)

First discourse, ‘Dig Deep’, 01.11.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, today we start a new series of talks on Zen, particularly on Master Isan. The name of the series will give you an indication what kind of man Isan was. The title of the series is ‘Isan: No Footprints in the Blue Sky’. He was as great a master as one can be, but he has left behind him neither great scriptures nor great commentaries. Isan functioned exactly as Buddha had said an authentic master would – to disappear in the blue sky like a bird, leaving no footprints.
Why this idea of leaving no footprints? It has great implications in it. It means a great master does not create a following; he does not make a path for everybody to follow. He flies in the sky, he gives you a longing for flying, and disappears into the blueness of the sky – creating an urge in you to discover what it is like to disappear into the ultimate.
Isan followed exactly what Buddha had said. He is a great master, but almost forgotten. Who remembers people who have not created great followings, who have not made organized religions, who have not chosen their successors, who have not made their religion a politics, a power in the material world? Isan did none of that. He simply lived silently. Of course thousands of disciples were attracted towards him, but it was not his fault. You cannot blame him for it – it was just the magnetic force that he had become by disappearing into enlightenment. The light shone to faraway lands and those who had eyes started moving towards a small place hidden in the forest where Isan lived. Slowly, slowly, thousands of disciples were living in the forest – and Isan had not called a single one. They had come on their own.” (p. 4)

* Kyozan. A True Man of Zen. Talks Given in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium / Osho. Editor: Sw Anand Robin. Introduction: Sw Anand Robin. Design: Ma Anand Peggy. Ma Prem Arya. Photography: Sw Premgit. Ma Deva Sarito. Sw Puneet Bharti. Cover painting: Sw Geetesh. Typesetting: Ma Prem Sonar. Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1990 (no year). First edition. 84 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos. Hardcover. Size: 20,5×14,5 cm. Weight: 260 g. ISBN 3-89338-080-9. Period: 03.12 pm – 06.12 pm 1988. 4 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Osho. English Language Editions. Other Publishers. Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho. Osho Meditation Centers and Communes. For further information contact: Osho Commune International. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International. In Loving Gratitude to Osho.
First book to be published with Osho as author’s name.
The Rebel Publishing House now also with US address: 1075 N.W. Murray Road, Suite 258, Portland, OR 97229, USA.
‘Note to the Reader’ (no pagination) is identical to text in Dogen. The Zen Master’ (1989), with new design to indicate the various phases in meditation at the end of each discourse.
Maneesha’s question is read by Osho in discourse.
Discourses are now finished:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes, Beloved Master.”

Introduction by Sw Anand Robin:
“These four discourses were delivered from December 3rd to 6th, 1988, between two long periods when Osho’s body was too sick to come to Gautama the Buddha Auditorium. He had stopped dancing with us on October 14th: “I have to express my apology to you that I could not join in your dance. The whole credit goes to President Ronald Reagan…” and he told us how he had been poisoned in American jails. “I have almost overcome the poison, just … in the bones and particularly in the joints it is still stuck. I have been dancing with you without bothering about it. I would have continued, but today the pain became too much. The pain is not the problem for me. The problem was: if I continue then perhaps I may have to stop speaking. So it is better to let this pain settle.”
We could see during these few days, as he walked to his chair, how frail his body was, and despite the strength of his voice and the power of his presence, many hearts and minds feared his body might not be with us much longer. It was no surprise when there was no discourse on December 7th and not yet again until December 26th, when he said:
“My Beloved Ones, I have been too long away from you… These few days and nights have been days and nights of a certain purification. The poison delivered to me by President Ronald Reagan and his staff… from all over the world experts in poison said that amongst all the poisons this is the one which cannot be detected in any way. It has been the practice of the CIA in America to give this poison, because there is no way to find it out. And if you cannot find it you cannot give any antidotes. Death has been almost certain.
“These long days and nights I had taken the challenge of the poison, just witnessing. The poison was a constant torture on every joint of the bones, but a miracle has happened. Slowly, slowly, from all joints it has disappeared. The last were the two arms. Today” – December 26 – “I am free from that too. I have a strong feeling that, although I was not physically present here, you have felt me in the air. You have felt me more strongly than ever before. And in your songs I was present. In your meditations, remember, I was more present than physical presence allows.”
When asked to talk about his sickness he said, “No… being sick is enough… And remember, my body can be sick, I am never sick. I watch everything, whatever happens. I will watch my death as I watched my life, and that’s my simple teaching to you.”
In the same discourse he dropped the name we had called him for twenty years, which we had loved, which had become part of us – though I wonder now, had we ever been totally at ease with it? He said he had used it to provoke the Hindus. “I hate the word. I don’t want to be called Bhagwan again. Enough is enough! The joke is over!”
The next night he said: “I am feeling so light by dropping a single word. I feel I can fly like a swan to the eternal snows of the Himalayas.” And it was obvious that his body was marvellously stronger – though not simply because of dropping a name. “For seven weeks I was fighting with the poison day and night. One night even my physician, Amrito, became suspicious that perhaps I cannot survive. He was taking my pulse rate and heartbeats on his cardiogram. Seven times I missed one heartbeat.
“The seventh time I missed a heartbeat it was natural for his scientific mind to think, ‘Now we are fighting a battle that is almost lost.’ But I said to him, “Don’t be worried. Your cardiogram can be wrong; it’s just a mechanical device. Trust in my witnessing. Don’t bother about my heartbeats.’
“On the last day of the seven weeks’ struggle when all pain from by body disappeared, Amrito could not believe it. It was happening almost like a miracle. Where has all the pain disappeared?”
So these few discourses landed in those seven weeks of struggle against the poison have the fragility of a reprieve and also a delicacy, breathtaking like the tiny sky-blue speedwell flowers I saw recently, the first to appear after grass-burning, but strong with the life force – like silence itself, immensely strong and deep and easily broken. Here is the Zen paradox of delicate strength, a tremendous statement in a few light words.
He said at the start of the December 6th discourse: “It hurts me to disturb your silence by using words, but I hope a day will arrive when we will be sitting together allowing the silence to become deeper – because whatever can be said only touches the periphery. It never goes beyond the periphery; no word has ever reached to the center. You are not only hearing my words, you are also hearing me, and that is the true hearing, my heartbeat.”
In an earlier discourse: “The Zen encounter is not one of words.”… “The Zencounter is a communion in silence.”… “The silence here is so dense one feels a little afraid even to utter a word. It may disturb the silent lake of your consciousness. But always remember that in the wake of words, silence is deepened… The essential Zen is an effort to bring you to the language of existence that you have forgotten completely.” Sw Anand Robin M.A. (Cantab.) (No page number)

First discourse, ‘The Tremendous Statement’, 03.12.1988 pm. Opening words:
“Maneesha, a new series of talks begins today. These are not sermons in a church; these are communions. A discourse, a sermon, remains within the limits of the mind. Only a communion can raise you beyond the mind, and that which is beyond the mind is Zen. A new series of communions is a great event. We will be looking into the very heart of Kyozan.
Kyozan was a very simple man – not the philosophic kind, not a poet, nor a sculptor. Nothing can be said about him except that he was absolutely authentic, honest. If he does not know a thing he will say so, even at the risk of people thinking that he has fallen from his enlightenment. But this makes him a unique master.
Zen is full of unique masters, but Kyozan’s uniqueness is his simplicity. He is just like a child. It took Isan, his master, forty years of hard work to make Kyozan enlightened. He was determined, and he said he would not leave the body until Kyozan became enlightened – though he was very old.
Kyozan did everything that Isan said, but nothing penetrated to his very being. He was a very ordinary man. Heaven and hell, God and the beyond had never worried him. He was not a seeker in the sense every seeker is – a seeker of truth.
No, he was not seeking truth, because he is reported to have said that, “If you are seeking the truth you have certainly accepted that truth exists, and I will not accept anything on belief. So I am just seeking, searching in all directions, trying to come in tune with the universe. It may be just my fallacy, my fantasy, but I want to go without any prejudice.”
Even the prejudice may prove right, but when a prejudice proves right, you will never know the truth. You will go on projecting your prejudice.
And you can create a whole paraphernalia of prejudices, a system of beliefs – rational, logical, appealing, presentable – but if belief is the base stone on which you are creating the whole palace, you are working unnecessarily hard.
Nobody can come to know the truth by any preconceived idea, His preconceived idea will give a certain shape, a certain color to the experience. The experience will not be pure. It will be as polluted as Poona’s air!” (p. 3)

* No Mind. The Flowers of Eternity. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Editors: Ma Deva Sarito. Sw Anand Robin. Introduction: Sw Dhyan Yogi. Design: Sw Shivananda. Sw Premgit. Paintings of “The maiden Avalokitesvara” by Tenuo Kanno, Kobe, Japan. Painting of “The great swan on the wing” by Ma Prem Prartho. Other paintings by Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashomoto). Calligraphy: Ma Prem Mansha. Ma Deva Satyama. Sw Anand Govind. Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Sw Prem Prabodh. Sw Satyam Ambhoj. Sw Prem Joshua. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 274 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos from Buddha Hall, calligraphy and etchings. Hardcover. Size: 21,5×19 cm. Weight: 730 g. ISBN 3-89338-060-4. Period: 26.12 pm 1988 – 07.01 pm 1989. 12 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Osho. English Language Editions. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions (Dutch: 29 titles; German: 48 titles; Italian: 33 titles; Japanese: 23 titles; Korean: 41 titles; Portuguese: 27 titles; Russian: 17 titles; Spanish: 25 titles). Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information contact: Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In Loving Gratitude to Osho Rajneesh Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
Paper quality suitable for b&w photos and illustrations.
“Dedicated to Katue Ishida, seeress and prophetess of one of the most ancient shrines of Shinto in Japan, Ise shrine, with great love and blessing.” Followed by Osho’s Signature.
On front and back flaps: “On december 26, 1988, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh emerged from a seven-week struggle with the effects of poison administered to him by agents of the U.S. government, with a startling announcement. He accepted the statement of a well-known Japanese seeres that his body had become a vehicle for Gautam Buddha, and he denounced the name by which he had been known for almost 25 years: “I don’t want to be called Bhagwan again,” he said. “Enough is enough! The joke is over!”
The days that followed brought further shocks, more revelations, and reactions from traditional Buddhists all over the world. This book is a chronicle of those mind-boggling, mysterious and sometimes hilarious times.”
“Flowers are showering, a new breeze… a fresh fragrance, an open sky full of stars. A sense of eternity… to know this is all there is to know.”
Masters mentioned on front jacket: Basho, Bodhidharma, Chosa, Daiji, Daizui, Gautama Buddha, Hogen, Ikan, Isan, Joshu, Kakusan, Koko, Kyozan, Manjushri, Ma Tzu, Nansen, Samantabhadra, Sekito, Shokei, Shu.
On back jacket: “On December 26, 1988, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh announced, “I don’t want to be called Bhagwan again!” and accepted the declaration of a famous Japanese seeress that he had become a vehicle for the soul of Gautam Buddha. Thus begins one of the most mind-boggling series of events ever to happen in the mysterious world of the enlightened Master and his disciples…”
On front and back endpapers: “The great swan on the wing; the flight of the alone to the alone.”
Chapters 1-12 are the lectures of this series. Chapter 13 is an excerpt of ‘Zen. The Mystery and the Poetry of the Beyond’, chapter 3 (10.01.1989), where he continues on the issue of his name and dropping ‘Buddha’. See also the scans at www.sannyas.wiki.
‘Note to the Reader’ (no pagination) is identical to text in ‘Dogen. The Zen Master’ (1989), with new design to indicate the various phases in meditation at the end of each discourse.
Maneesha’s question is read by Osho in discourse.
Discourses are now finished:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes, Beloved Master.”
After Introduction and ‘Note to the Reader’ is a doublepage with photos:
“Every night is an occasion for celebration at Rajneeshdham, as sannyasins and friends gather in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium to wait for the evening discourse.
At about 6:45pm the musicians begin to play, softly at first, and as the time for the Master’s arrival draws near, building the tempo. The music reaches a crescendo several times, each time climaxing in a roar of “Yaa-Hoo!” – arms raised to the sky, a pindrop silence, and then the music slowly begins again.
In the stillness following the last and mightiest “Yaa-Hoo!” the Master appears on the podium, hands folded in the traditional Eastern greeting of namaste. The assembly returns His greeting, bowing down as His gaze travels slowly over each part of the hall. Finally the Master takes His seat, the music stops and the discourse begins.” (No page number)

Introduction by Sw Dhyan Yogi:
“This book chronicles a twelve-day revolution in the life of Osho Rajneesh beginning on December 26, 1988, a period which altered the lives of millions of people – and most of them don’t know it.
Life has its strange ways, but this was the strangest. The Living Master, Osho Rajneesh, in a sizzling retort to thirty years of accusations and abuse about His name ‘Bhagwan’, dropped it altogether.
The explanation He gave of His simple strategy – to adopt and then drop the name ‘Bhagwan’ – dealt a paralyzing blow to two of the so-called “great religions” of India, Hinduism and Jainism. The name was a challenge they could never meet, created by a man they could never equal.
It revealed a secret which even the Master’s most intimate disciples never knew. He showed something which could never be uttered; a Master stroke was needed. One man against 900 million people, and the solitary man had won.
The third “great religion” born in India, Buddhism, then had its share of attention. For millions of Buddhist worldwide, the haunted wait for the return of Buddha’s soul was over. As predicted, the ‘Maitreya’, the reincarnated soul of Buddha, had come -and had chosen as his home none other than Osho Rajneesh.
What happened in the next four days puzzled Buddhist pundits, scholars and theologians the world over – and defeated the expectations of everyone. The Master exposed a forgotten but obvious truth: that truth itself is fresh, never old, never antique. And the whole idea of Gautama the Buddha as a returning guide is anachronism, a bullock cart in the space age. The very dream of a return to some imagined perfection of the past, He showed, could keep us from living the sweetness of this moment, from living the benediction of our own buddha nature. Another burden removed.
He showed us in these twelve discourses that this moment contains an even greater possibility than Gautama the Buddha promised, a different and greater synthesis, a vaster discovery: Zorba the Buddha.
Osho Rajneesh became that. Explained that. And moved on. He left a wild unexplored space behind, a potential. Wild flowers blooming on the slopes of Everest. Springtime.” Sw Dhyan Yogi, M.D. (No page number)

First discourse, ‘To Create a Few More Rainbows’, 26.12.1988 pm. Opening words:
“My Beloved Ones, I have been too long away from you. But this “awayness” was just like the glasses I’m wearing. Although you cannot see me, I can see you.
I used to hear your “Yaa-Hoo.” And each time I heard it stars showered over my small hut.
These few days and nights have been days and nights of a certain purification. The poison that has been delivered to me by President Ronald Reagan and his staff… from all over the world experts in poison said that amongst all the poisons this is the one which cannot be detected in any way. And it has been the practice of the CIA in America to give this poison, because there is no way to find it out. and if you cannot find it you cannot give any antidotes. Death has been almost certain.
These long days and nights I have taken the challenge of the poison, just witnessing. The poison was a constant torture on every joint of the bones, but a miracle has happened. Slowly slowly, from all joints it has disappeared. The last were the two arms. Today I am free from that too.
I have a strong feeling that although I was not physically present here, you have felt me in the air. You have felt me more closely than ever before. And in your songs, I was present. In your meditations, remember, I was more present than physical presence allows.
I had come out today for a special reason.
A few months ago in Bombay, Govind Siddhart had a vision that Gautam Buddha’s soul has been searching for a body. And he saw in his vision that my body has become a vehicle for Gautam Buddha.
He was right. But this is the misfortune of man: that you can go wrong even though you have touched upon a point of rightness. Because I declared him to be enlightened, he has disappeared. Since then I have not seen him. Perhaps he thinks, “Now, what is the use? I was searching for enlightenment and I have found it…”
But I hate the word [Bhagwan]! I have been waiting for some Hindu idiot to come forward, but they think that it is something very dignified and I have no right to call myself Bhagwan. Today I say absolutely, “Yes, but I have every right to denounce the word.” Nobody can prevent me. I don’t want to be called Bhagwan again. Enough is enough! The joke is over!
But I accept the Japanese Zen prophetess. And from now onwards I am Gautam the Buddha. You can call me “The Beloved Friend.” Drop the word ‘Bhagwan’ completely. Even very intelligent people, people who respect me and love me…
Just the other day I received an appreciation of my book ‘Zarathustra’ by an internationally famous journalist. He has praised it, and he has said that after Adi Shankara – the most famous Hindu philosopher – I am the second as far as intellectual, rational, spiritual authenticity is concerned.
But still he could not forget the word ‘bhagwan’, why I called myself Bhagwan. But does he know that he is comparing me with Adi Shankara who has been called for over a thousand years “Bhagwan Adi Shankara.” And nobody asks the question why…
But as far as Gautam the Buddha is concerned, I welcome him in my very heart. I will give him my words, my silences, my meditations, my being, my wings. From today onwards you can look at me as Gautam the Buddha.
I will tell you about the Japanese Buddhist seeress – she has sent her picture:
“Katue Ishida, mystic of one of the biggest and most famous Shinto shrines in Japan, stated recently after seeing Bhagwan’s picture, that: ‘This is the person that Maitreya the Buddha has entered. He is trying to create a utopia in the twenty-first century. Lots of destructive power is against Him, and some people call Him Satan. But I have never known Satan to be poisoned. He is usually the poisoner, not the poisoned. We must protect this man, Bhagwan. Buddha has entered Him.”
With great love and respect I accept Ishida’s prophecy. She will be welcome here as one of my people, most loved. And by accepting Gautam the Buddha as my very soul, I go out of the Hindu fold completely; I go against the Jaina fold completely.” (pp. 4,7-9)

The editors Ma Deva Sarito and Sw Anand Robin write on reactions from Buddhists:
“Over the years, the Master has managed to expose the falsities and blind spots of virtually all organized religions in the world. These past few days, it has been the Buddhists’ turn to have a look around in the light.
It seems that at least for some, it was too bright for their eyes.
What follows is an excerpt from the Master’s discourse of January 10, when He responded to the actions taken by one of the Buddhist organizations in India.
Further developments and details can be found in the book ‘Zen: The Mystery and the Poetry of the Beyond’. -Ed.” (Chapter 13, p. 258)

* Zen. The Mystery and the Poetry of the Beyond. Talks Given to the Osho Commune International in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho. Editor: Sw Krishna Prabhu. Introduction: Ma Deva Sarito. Design: Ma Dhyan Vipassana. Calligraphy: Qui Zheng Ping. Back cover painting: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashomoto). Back cover calligraphy (“No Mind”): Sw Anand Govind. Photography: Sw Veet Shastro. Sw Sat Samydaya. Sw Puneer Bharti. Typesetting: Ma Anand Disha. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Sw Sangit Samarpan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1990 (no year). First edition. 162 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos and calligraphy. Hardcover. Size: 19,5×12 cm. Weight: 290 g. ISBN 3-89338-082-5. Period: 08.01 pm – 12.01 pm 1989. 5 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Osho. English Language Editions. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Major Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho. Osho Meditation Centers and Communes. For further information about Osho: Osho Commune International. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In Loving Gratitude to Osho. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Australia)
The Rebel Publishing House also with US address: 1075 N.W. Murray Road, Suite 258, Portland, OR 97229, USA.
Zen sutras, anecdotes and masters quoted: Shomoku, Seijo, Roso, Saigun, Chu Kokushi, Nan-yin, Chokoman.
‘Note to the Reader’ (no pagination) is identical to text in ‘Dogen. The Zen Master’ (1989), with new design to indicate the various phases in meditation at the end of each discourse.
Maneesha’s question and other questions are read by Osho in discourse.
Discourses are now finished:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes, Beloved Master.”

Introduction by Ma Deva Sarito:
“Imagine a place where the barriers that usually divide people – the barriers of race, of language, of nation, of political and religious ideology – no longer exist. A place where laughter is the most commonly heard sound when a group of people gather. A place devoted to helping each individual discover and express his or her own uniqueness and creativity. A place where washing the floor is an activity just as honored and valued as making a painting, or organizing a staff of a hundred people.
Paradise? No, Poona. Osho Commune International, it’s called, and it is flourishing despite the opposition of governments and organized religions all over the world to what it represents.
Osho, the man at the center of this extraordinary place is an unstoppable hurricane of transforming energy, a one-man rebellion against the whole past, an irresistible call to wake up before it’s so late there won’t be any future.
It is our habit to look at the world through the eyes of our past experience and knowledge. Religion, therefore, is a Sunday affair, or a life renunciation, or the promise of a paradise after death. It depends on our conditioning.
Osho’s work is to dismantle that conditioning, to turn our attention towards “the mystery and the poetry of the beyond.” It has made Him very unpopular with those who prefer people to be conditioned and therefore obedient, faithful, and otherwise supportive of those who have got us in the mess we are in.
Osho is redefining religion, breathing back into the spirit of man. And as you will see on the pages which follow, He does it as it has never been done before.
“It is time to become a flower,” He says. “I have come to you as a spring.” Ma Deva Sarito. Poona, 1990. (No page number)

First discourse, ‘Leaving the Mind Far Behind’, 08.01.1989 pm. From opening words:
“My Friends…
Today begins a new series of talks. The title of the new series is: ‘Zen: The Mystery and the Poetry of the Beyond’.
Before I discuss the sutras brought by Maneesha, on behalf of all of you, a few words about the title of the new series, ‘Zen: The Mystery and the Poetry of the Beyond’.
I don’t consider Zen a philosophy or a theology but closer to poetry, to music, to painting, to dancing, to singing. It is not renunciation of life, it is rejoicing in life with your whole heart. And as you become deeply involved in creative lifestyles, the beyond opens its doors. I will simply call it ‘beyond’, because all other words, that have been used have become contaminated by the old religions, but ‘the beyond’ is still pure; and because it is a poetry, a creative act, which in its peak transforms you and brings you to the doors of the mystery.
This whole existence is a mystery; only for blind people there is no mystery. If you have eyes, then everything is mysterious, and there is no solution for it. The deeper you go into it, the more mysterious it becomes. And there is no bottom to the depth, it is abysmal. You can go on and on and on; the mystery becomes more mysterious, more colorful, more fragrant, but you don’t come to the end where you can find an explanation for the mystery.” (pp. 3,9)

* One Seed Makes the Whole World Green. Talks given to Osho Commune Internatioanl in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India, January 13-16, 1989 / Osho. Editor: Sw Anand Robin. Introduction: Sw Geet Govind. Design: Ma Krishna Gopa. Photography: Sw Premgit. Sw Puneet Bharti. Ma Deva Sarito. Paintings: Sw Shivananda. Typesetting: Ma Anand Disha. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Ma Punyo. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1990 (no year). First edition. 179 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos and drawings. Hardcover. Size: 19×12 cm. Weight: 310 g. ISBN 389 339-077-9. Period: 13.10. – 16.01.1989. 4 discourses. Subject: Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Osho. Osho’s discourses have been published in over six hundred books, many of which have been translated into several different languages, and most were originally published under the name of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. The following is a small selection of titles particularly related to the subject matter of this current volume. Meditation: The First and Last Freedom. The Rajneesh Bible, Vols 1-4. Major Distribution Centers for the works of Osho.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In Loving Gratitude to Osho. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
The Rebel Publishing House also with US address: 1075 N.W. Murray Road, Suite 258, Portland, OR 97229, USA.
From back flap:
“You have to go within yourself and cut the roots of all your darkness. Then suddenly a flame jumps up from your very center and fills your whole being, and slowly starts radiating around you, in your presence, in your eyes, in your gestures, in your grace, in your blissfulness.
The Buddha is your birthright, It is not a question of imitating any Buddha – there have been thousands – you need not imitate anyone. You have to find your own. You are carrying it from your very birth, perhaps for many lives, but you have never looked inwards.
The idea of waking up simply means waking up from your very center, so that you can see your authentic nature.”

Introduction by Sw Geet Govind. Excerpt:
“In these discourses, Osho shakes us to our very roots. He wants nothing more than to give us back to ourselves – not to accept anything on anyone’s authority except our own. To read about a thirsty man drinking water will not quench our own thirst. Knowledge, scholarliness will only make us well-trained parrots; and unless something is from our own experience, it is simply not true.
Using sutras and anecdotes of Rinzai and other Zen masters as a springboard, this living Master shares His vision and His being with us. He invites us to inquire – not to accept, not to believe, not to take His word for it, but simply to inquire… “I want you to understand absolutely: never believe in anything. Experiment. Belief prevents you from searching for the truth. Never stop at a belief. Stop only at an experience of your own.”
For Osho, Zen is the only true religion; the only approach to religion which has not put fetters on mankind, made sheep out of born lions. It is a seed, pregnant with vast potential, which can indeed make the whole earth green.
“… Zen is going to be paving the path for the new man to come, and for the new humanity to emerge. It is the only authentic gold that has come out of the whole past of humanity. My love for it is not in vain.”
His words can give only a hint, but they contain His flavor. If we can just relax and read with open hearts, then the possibility is there for us, too, to discover that there is a fountain within us, a place to which each of us can return and quench our thirst.” (No page number)

First discourse, ‘Peace of Mind, My Foot!’, 13.01.1989. Opening words:
“Friends, the other day, the hilarious drama of a procession against me reached to the very peak. I have heard that three hundred donkeys surrounding one bodhisattva reached to the police commissioner’s office asking for me to be arrested, because I am destroying the culture of a self-styled city which dreams of being cultured.
The one bodhisattva was carrying my effigy. The one bodhisattva looked like a donkey, and the three hundred donkeys looked like human beings. Even the donkey was laughing, because he was the only authentic being in that crowd: “What has happened to this cultured city and these so-called cultured people?”
Donkeys by their very nature are very silent people, very philosophical, very cultured. And this donkey was wondering, “Except me… all the three hundred donkeys who are hiding behind human masks, are doing my work, ‘Cheepon, cheepon'” (Hindi for “Hee-haw, hee-haw.”)
These so-called human beings, self-styled, cultured ones, thought that they were insulting me. Nobody in the world can insult me, because it is in my hands: if I accept the insult, it is okay; if I don’t accept it, you have to carry it to your home. Nobody can humiliate me. Humiliation needs my acceptance.
On the contrary, these people were proving everything right that I have been saying to you. They were thinking that they are destroying my arguments by such processions. No procession can be an argument. No procession proves intelligence, it only proves retardedness. And carrying my effigy on poor donkey simply exposes their real face; they are donkey-worshippers.
A few human beings are not human beings. There are so many categories: a few are still chimpanzees, a few are still gorillas, a few are still monkeys, a few are still donkeys, a few are still Yankees.
But in this so-called, self-styled cultured city, not a single person objected to these people, that “You are exposing yourselves, your vulgarity, your unculturedness.” (pp. 4-5)

* Yakusan. Straight to the Point of Enlightenment. Talks Given to Osho Commune International in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho. Editor: Sw Anand Robin. Ma Prem Mangla. Introduction: Ma Prem Mangla. Translation of sutras: Sw Advait Parva. Design: Ma Krishna Gopa. Photography: Sw Veet Shastro. Endpaper paintings: Sw Atit Kaivalya (Zupo). Illustrations: Ma Deva Padma. Typesetting: Ma Anand Disha. Production: Ma Punyo. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1990 (no year). First edition. 216 pages. Illustrated with b&w photos and drawings. Hardcover. Size: 19,5×12 cm. Weight: 345 g. ISBN 3-89338-084-1. Period: 17.01 pm – 21.01 pm 1989. 5 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Osho. English Language Editions. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho. Osho Meditation Centers and Communes. For further information about Osho: Osho Commune International. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
The Rebel Publishing House also with US address: 1075 N.W. Murray Road, Suite 258, Portland, OR 97229, USA.
‘Table of Contents’: Chapter 4 ‘The Sutra is Long, The Night is Short’, page 146. Erratum: page 126.
Zen sutras, anecdotes and masters quoted: Koke, Yakusan (four chapters).
‘Note to the Reader’ (no pagination) is identical to text in ‘Dogen. The Zen Master’ (1989), with new design to indicate the various phases in meditation at the end of each discourse.
Maneesha’s question and questions from other sannyasins are read by Osho in discourse.
Discourses are now finished:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes, Beloved Master.”

Introduction by Ma Prem Mangla:
“This series of discourses was given almost exactly one year before Osho left His body. It was a time of tremendous intensity and tremendous depth for all those who sat with Him; a time when the impact, the urgency and the beauty of the evening hours with the Master reverberated right through the following day.
He had only recently declared that He was no longer to be called Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh; He had not yet declared Himself Osho. Hundreds of thousands of His disciples worldwide sat in the gap, no longer knowing how to relate to their personal spiritual Master. He was already moving away from us, cutting our attachment.
Around this period He was talking for record lengths of time. His average discourse of one and a half hours went up to three, sometimes even four hours each evening as He showered us like never before. “The sutra is long and the night is short. I hope that I will be able to finish it before sunrise,” He jokes with us one evening. In less than three months He had stopped talking publicly forever.
These five discourses are based on the sutras of the Zen master, Yakusan. But as Osho Himself makes clear: “Never think for a moment that what I am saying about Zen has been said by the Zen masters themselves. I am constantly improving, improvising. Their background was their background; today that background does not exist, that world is no longer there. Man’s concern have changed, man’s conditionings have changed. Man is programmed in different ways. I have to deprogram the people who I am facing.”
This book is not so much about Zen as a Zen look at the world around us. The range and diversity of the subjects covered is vast as He points out, lovingly and often with considerable humor, the ridiculousness and the sickness of the human condition and our world; sickness that, He says, could well prove terminal if we don’t wake up.
Osho is not a prophet of doom, He simply speaks a truth which is possible only from an enlightened perspective. And if you let it, this truth cuts through your being to the very point where your own buddha, your own truth, lives. And what a miracle, what an excitement it is when this inner truth is recognized and felt.
This is what these discourses are really about: waking us up, giving us a taste of truth, a taste of Zen. “Zen is very straightforward,” He tells us. “Neither statues can help, nor scriptures can help. The only thing that can help is going deeper into yourself, realizing the inner sky and the freedom that comes with it.”
At the end of each discourse the Master leads the gathering of thousands directly into this space with His own unique brand of guided meditation. From a crescendo of laughter and gibberish, He takes us straight to the place where the inner buddha resides: Straight to the Point of Enlightenment.” Ma Prem Mangla, B.A. (psych.). (No page number)

First discourse, ‘Whatever the Cost, Enlightenment is Cheap’, 17.01.1989 pm. Opening words:
“Friends, the prime minister of India, Mr. Rajiv Gandhi, has made a statement to an international conference. The statement says that the earth is one. All national boundaries should be dissolved. All differences of caste and race and color should be dissolved. All divisions of organized religions should be dissolved.
I have been saying the same thing for almost twenty years, and my every meeting is an international conference. But I don’t have the power, I am not a politician.
I would like Mr. Rajiv Gandhi to understand the implications of what he is saying. I support him with my whole heart, but the question is: Who is going to begin it?
If I had the power, India would have been the first nation in the world to dissolve its armies, to drown all its armaments, to dissolve all distinctions of caste and religion and race.” (p. 4)

* Christianity, the Deadliest Poison & Zen, the Antidote to All Poisons. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Editor: Sw Krishna Prabhu. Introduction: Rudolph G. Wormser. Design: Sw Satyamurti. Photography: Sw Premgit. Endpaper paintings: Ma Yoga Shakti. Typesetting: Sw Gyan Atol. Ma Premo. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1990 (no year). First edition. 340 pages. Photosection on eight pages (between the pages 164 and 165) with five color photos of Osho reading and in Lao Tzu Library. Hardcover. Size: 22×17 cm. Weight: 660 g. ISBN 3-89338-071-X. Period: 22.01 pm – 29.01 pm 1989. 8 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Osho Rajneesh. English Language Editions. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Osho Rajneesh Meditation Centers and Communes. For further information contact Osho Rajneesh Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
Appendix A, pp. 326-30: Rudolf G. Wormser. On two works:
– Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums / Karlheinz Deschner. Vols I-X. 1986ff.
– Vicars of Christ: The Dark Side of the Papacy / Peter de Rosa. New York, Crown Publishers, 1988.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
Zen sutras, anecdotes and masters quoted: Yakusan (eight chapters), Isan.
‘Note to the Reader’ (no pagination) is identical to text in ‘Dogen. The Zen Master’ (1989), with symbols to indicate the various phases in meditation at the end of each discourse.
Note on page 196: “A group of students from a local seminary attended one discourse recently, and their questions were addressed throughout the series, Christianity, the Greatest [Deadliest] Poison and Zen, the Antidote to all Poisons.”
Maneesha’s question is read by Osho in discourse.
Discourses are now finished:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes, Beloved Master.”

Introduction by Rudolf G. Wormser:
“Here is The Great Gift Book for those ninety or more percent Christians to whom being Christian is just a formality. It is not…
I came across Osho. Many times I heard Him speak on religion, but I was not concerned. I was a pagan, in my mind, so He must be telling this “religious stuff” to other people. As soon as He started on about religion, it was time for a little nap.
But reading His books and listening to His tapes, by and by things started turning up. Why, for example, could I never relax after sex, but jumped immediately to any crazy activity available, at least inside? Not that I had not enjoyed this after-sex speed. In fact, most university lectures plus several books were written in that energy, but it had become too much of a habit, raising questions like: “Where are you going?”
Something had clicked, and a process started which is still at work: becoming more and more aware of the Christian programming. I found that shame and guilt bypass consciousness and manifest directly in the body, in my case particularly as sore throat with fever.
For example, reading a book by Dr. George Meredith, Osho’s personal physician, I suddenly fell sick with fever and tonsillitis – although my tonsils were removed long ago. The words must have brought up enormous guild: “My God, I had been such a rock, insensitive, for years and years not able to see the most precious and most fragile rose.”…
Now see the words of Osho – and there is the open sky of a human being without any conditioning, lighthearted, easy, free – a master of Zen. His words dance. His sentences create a vast emptiness. His outrageous jokes, mysterious Zen anecdotes, symbolic parables and real-life stories give us glimpses – almost against our will – of the unspeakable, the eternal miracle of Zen.
Otherwise, we just need a surgeon to remove the Christian glue blocking our eyes and hearts. But no need to worry. We have found Him, sword in one hand, lotus flower in the other. Relaxing with this book into our favorite armchair, we can trust:
“Silence everywhere / The cicada’s voice / pierces rocks.”” Rudolf G. Wormser, Ph.D., M.Sc., Psychology. (pp. vi-ix)

First discourse, ‘The Opium of the People’, 22.01.1989 pm. Opening words:
“Friends, One of the sannyasins has asked me a question.
If the truth is one, then why do all the masters, all the awakened ones, speak in different ways? Sometimes even looks as if they are contradictory.
The truth is certainly one, but it has multidimensional reality, and every master has to choose a certain dimension. You cannot speak all the dimensions together.
Every master has his own style, his own way of speaking, his own way of conveying. The higher you rise in consciousness and awareness, the more you become unique, the more you become individual.
But let me explain to you:
Individuality is not personality.
Personality is given by the society to you. Individuality is your intrinsic nature. Personality is fake, a fraud. Individuality is your innermost buddha, your innermost enlightenment, your innermost door to the divine.
But every master is bound to be unique in his expressions. They are all saying the same thing, they are all indicating towards the same moon, but their fingers are different. They are bound to be different. The finger of Buddha, the finger of Lao Tzu, the finger of Chuang Tzu, are bound to be different. If you pay too much attention to the finger, there is every possibility you will forget the purpose. The purpose was not the finger, the purpose was the moon.
All the differences are in the fingers, in their expressions. The experience of truth is one, but to bring it to expression, every master has to find his own device. That’s why even enlightened people appear to you to be speaking differently, even contradictorily – because existence does not have onedimensional sources, it is multidimensional. It is comprehensive of all contradictions. All contradictions melt into one cosmos.” (p. 3)

* Communism & Zen Fire, Zen Wind. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho Rajneesh. Editor: Ma Deva Sarito. Ma Shivam Suvarna. Introduction: George Meredith. Design: Sw Dhyan Jayadip. Photography: Sw Premgit. Endpaper paintings: Ma Anand Meera (Kasue Hashimoto). Typesetting: Ma Anand Disha. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Sw Paritosho. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1990 (no year). First edition. 338 pages. Hardcover. Size: 22×17 cm. Weight: 650 g. ISBN 3-89338-072-8. Period: 30.01 pm – 05.02 pm 1989.7 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Books by Osho Rajneesh. English Language Editions. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions. Osho Rajneesh Meditation Centers and Communes. For further information contact Osho Rajneesh Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh. Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
Zen sutras, anecdotes and masters quoted: Yakusan (three chapters), Ungan (three chapters), Dogo, Nansen.
‘About the Author’, pp. 320-321.
‘Note to the Reader’ (no pagination) is identical to text in ‘Dogen. The Zen Master’ (1989), with symbols to indicate the various phases in meditation at the end of each discourse.
Maneesha’s question and others’ questions are read by Osho in discourse.
Discourses are now finished:
“Okay, Maneesha?
Yes, Beloved Master.”
“The new series begins today: Communism and Zen Fire, Zen wind.” (p. 21)

Introduction by George Meredith. Excerpt:
“Enter Osho Rajneesh. In this book, this incredible man covers the history of the Soviet Union, the role of Stalin, Trotsky, Lenin, and the rest. More importantly he talks directly to Mikhail Gorbachev, about what is happening to his country and what direction he now needs to take.
As usual Osho Rajneesh seems to come out of some plane no one else on the planet occupies. While everyone is busy telling themselves what a monster Stalin was, Osho is pointing out that without Stalin – crimes and all – no Gorbachev. While everyone is congratulating Gorbachev on allowing the traditional religions back into the Soviet Union, Osho is telling him, don’t.
Fifteen percent of U.S. citizens are below the poverty line, and twenty percent of Russians are below the poverty line – are you going to destroy communism for just five percent of the population? Mr. Gorbachev, don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater, Osho seems to be saying.
Osho’s analysis is brilliant, and of course, totally unique. And what is his prescription? Another revolution! This time, a spiritual revolution. And where will that come from? Zen,
The brilliant Japanese, who are forever importing an idea, improving it, refining it, and then re-exporting it, have done it again. Suddenly, the Buddhism that left India and went to China with Bodhidharma fourteen centuries ago – and then spread to the rest of Asia – has returned from Japan to India, and in Osho Rajneesh has found its most sublime expression.
The Zen that unfolds from these discourses is a most delicate flower of pure religiousness – no God, no heaven, no hell, no priests, no organization – just the pure no-mind of the mystic geniuses of centuries, transformed into a real human perspective, ephemeral yet palpable, extraordinary yet ordinary, earthy yet sacred, natural yet divine.
Here is the missing link, the ingredient that Marx could never have guessed at. Here is the golden key that poor Kropotkin and Bakunin never understood was at the root of their conflict with Marx and Engels.
The world is at a watershed. Capitalism creates wealth – at a cost. Communism provides the square meals – at a cost. Is this the only choice we have: rich, violent, competitive USA – or poor, old-fashioned, inefficient USSR?
Russia, China, and the whole of the communist block is caught at this very moment on the horns of this dilemma, and none of them understands how to escape this false dichotomy. Read on, Comrade. Here it is. Osho Rajneesh is not the bête noir of the Western power elites for nothing. You want to know how to synthesize the best of capitalism with the best of communism? So did we, and we asked Osho.
Here, in this incredible book, are the answers. I won’t spoil the punchline, you will just have to read through to the end to find out – that’s if you really want to lose your chains and gain the world. Not just that, but gain a civilized world for once, a world fit for human beings – it’s time already, as those two nice Jewish boys might have said.” George Meredith. M.D. M.B., B.S. M.R.C.P. Cologne, West Germany. August, 1989. (pp. ix-xi)

First discourse, ‘Marx and Buddha Hand in Hand’, 30.01.1989 pm. Opening words:
“Friends, There is a group of Soviet comrades present here today. They have a few beautiful and simple questions. First I am going to answer them.
The first question:
You have dedicated a book to Gorbachev. Since you are against politicians, is this a contradiction?
Not at all, because Gorbachev is not a politician. His every act proves that he is a man in politics but not a politician. My dedication to Gorbachev and the academic scientist Sakharov was for this simple reason, that he is not a politician and is immensely interested in having peace in the world. He is for friendship in the world, not for war.
The politician’s mind is always concerned with war. Adolf Hitler in his autobiography, ‘My Struggle’, says that if a politician wants to remain in politics he has to continue creating enemies. If there are no real enemies, create fictions that somebody is going to attack you, that you are surrounded by enemies. Only that will keep you in power – not peace.
And it is a factual thing to know: your whole history is filled with heroes who were nothing but warmongers, people who massacred millions of people. Your history does not consist of a single name who was a peacemaker.
I have dedicated my book with deep love to Gorbachev and Sakharov because they are both working for world peace. That is not the way of the politician, that is the way of a humanitarian. That is the way of one who loves humanity, who loves this beautiful planet and wants to save it at any cost. And all his actions prove what I am saying.” (p. 3)

* God is Dead. Now Zen is the Only Living Truth. Talks Given to Osho Commune International in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India / Osho. Editor: Sw Anand Robin. Sw Anand Burt. Introduction: Sw Anand Burt. Design: Sw Dhyan Suryam. Photography: Sw Premgit. Paintings: Sw Anand Geetesh. Ma Krishna Gopa. Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Ma Punyo. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1990. 304 pages. Hardcover. Size: 22×17 cm. Weight: 600 g. ISBN: 3-89338-081-7. Period: 06.02 – 12.02.1989. 7 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Questions and Answers. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Major Distribution Centers of the Works of Osho. Books by Osho. Osho Meditation Centers and Communes.
All discourses with Osho’s commentary on the sutra as well as Questions and Answers.
‘Note to the Reader’ explaining the meditation format at the end of each discourse.
The honorific ‘Osho’ is mentioned several places in the sutras.
Dedicated to Friedrich Nietzsche who said: ‘God is dead.. at last the horizon seems to us again free’.

Introduction by Sw Anand Burt. Excerpt:
“In this volume Osho continues from the point where Nietzsche stopped. Zen – meditation leading toward no-mind – will unify us with an intelligent and bountiful existence which nourishes us as it nourishes all living things. Meditation, and only meditation, will fill the emptiness left by the loss of our dreams. We are seekers, and we often resist finding what we seek. Osho, as clearly as perhaps anyone ever has, puts it all right in our laps, “Here it is, take it.” With humor and lightness and infinite compassion, always leading but never pushing, he spells out his positive answer to Nietzsche’s negative dilemma. “I know how to make the whole world happy. Out of deep meditation bliss arises, and then you are so happy the whole day, without any cause. It is just bubbling inside you.”
Once I went to a meditation center in America and explained to a very pleasant lady there, with some understatement, that I hadn’t been feeling very well emotionally and I wanted a regular meditation program simply to feel better. She smiled at me and said, “I understand. Meditate or die, right?”
“It is meditation that fulfils your inner being and takes away the vacuum that used to be filled by a great lie, God.”” (No page number)

First discourse, ‘God is a Puppeteer’, 06.02.1989 pm. Opening words:
“Friends, a new series of talks begins today: God Is Dead, Now Zen Is the Only Living Truth. The series is dedicated to Friedrich Nietzsche, who was the first man in the history of mankind to declare, “God is dead, therefore man is free.”
It was a tremendous statement; its implications are many. First I would like to discuss Nietzsche’s statement.
All the religions believe that God created the world and also mankind. But if you are created by someone, you are only a puppet, you don’t have your own soul. And if you are created by somebody, he can uncreate you any moment. He neither asked you whether you wanted to be created, nor is he going to ask you, “Do you want to be uncreated?”
God is the greatest dictator, if you accept the fiction that he created the world and also created mankind. If God is a reality, then man is a slave, a puppet. All the strings are in his hands, even your life. Then there is no question of any enlightenment. Then there is no question of there being any Gautam the Buddha, because there is no freedom at all. He pulls the strings, you dance; he pulls the strings, you cry; he pulls the strings, you start murders, suicide, war. You are just a puppet and he is the puppeteer.
Then there is no question of sin or virtue, no questions of sinners and saints. Nothing is good and nothing is bad, because you are only a puppet. A puppet cannot be responsible for its actions. Responsibility belongs to someone who has the freedom to act. Either God can exist or freedom, both cannot exist together. That is the basic implication of Friedrich Nietzsche’s statement: God is dead, therefore man is free.” (p. 3)

Last discourse, ‘God is the Business of the Priest’, on 12.02.1989 pm, finishes before the jokes with the words:
“But Nietzsche’s trinity is certainly beautiful: cheerfulness, daring and love for life. These can be the attributes of every sannyasin: cheerfulness, daring and love for life.” (p. 299)

* I Celebrate Myself. God is No Where: Life is Now Here. Talks given to Osho Commune International in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India. February 13 – 19, 1989 / Osho. Editing: Ma Dhyan Sagar. Introduction: Sw Dhyan Yogi. Sutra translation: Sw Anand Vandano. Design: Sw Deva Anugito. Photography: Ma Himani. Sw Veet Shastro. Sw Samarpan Avikal. Outside cover and inside cover painting by Osho. Inside paintings: Sw Deva Prashant. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Ma Punyo. Ma Anand Ritu. Typesetting: Ma Anand Disha. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: The Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 279 pages. Illustrated with paintings and b&w photos. Hardcover. Size: 22×17 cm. Weight: 580 g. ISBN: 3-89338-079-5. Period: 13.02 pm – 19.02 pm 1989. 7 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Questions and Answers. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Books by Osho. English Language Editions. Other Publishers. Foreign Language Editions (only languages mentioned). Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho. Osho Meditation Centers. For Further Information Contact: Osho Commune International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh Foundation Australia. (Sponsor)
Four b&w photos of Osho during discourse, p. 20. Osho handing Sadar Gurudayal Singh a photo of the American sannyasin Martine Vaugel’s sculpture of him, three photos on p. 212.

Introduction by Sw Dhyan Yogi.
Following his discourses on Kahlil Gibran, Friedrich Nietzsche was the first western mystic Osho talked about in the spring of 1987 after he returned to Poona.

First discourse, ‘The Grand Rebellion’, 13.02.1989 pm. Opening words:
“Friends, Good evening. And good news…!
This evening we are starting a new series of talks: I Celebrate Myself: God Is No Where, Life Is Now Here.
The statement of Friedrich Nietzsche that God is dead is only symbolic, because God has never been in the first place – not even born. How can he be dead? But it was a tremendously powerful symbol to declare that God is dead.
It was a recognition that we have been worshipping a lie. And it was not only worshipping, we were being destroyed by the lie. We had been exploited by the priesthood of all the organized religions. Our dignity has been destroyed. We have been turned into puppets in the hands of a fiction.
His declaration that God is dead simply means that man is born. That is the other side of the coin. And because man is born, he brings freedom to the earth, he brings joy to the earth, he brings dignity to the earth. And he destroys all that was clinging to the ultimate lie, God – all the superstitions, heaven and hell, all theologies, all religions… all kinds of false programming of man’s being. They have also died with God.
Hence, I celebrate myself and I celebrate you.” (p. 3)

Last Discourse: Sammasati

* The Zen Manifesto. Freedom From Oneself. Talks Given to the Rajneesh International University of Mysticism in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona, India During the Months of February and April, 1989 / Osho Rajneesh. Editing: Ma Dhyan Sagar. Introduction: Ma Dhyan Sagar (p. vi) & Robert H. Rimmer (pp. vii-xiii). Design: Sw Dhyan Jayadip. Photography: Sw Premgit. Cover painting: Ma Yoga Shakti. Endpaper paintings: Sw Atit Kaivalya (Zupo). Calligraphy: Qui Zheng Ping. Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Ma Deva Naveena. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: Rebel Publishing House, Cologne, 1989 (no year). First edition. 304 pages. Hardcover. Size: 22×17 cm. Weight: 605 g. ISBN 3-89338-078-7. Period: 20.02 pm – 10.04 pm 1989. 11 discourses. Subject: Zen and Zen Masters. Place: Gautama the Buddha Auditorium, Poona. (A REBEL BOOK)

In Appendix: Worldwide Distribution Centers for the Works of Osho Rajneesh. Books by Osho Rajneesh. English Language Editions. Other Publishers. Rajneesh Meditation Centers, Ashrams and Communes. For further information about Osho Rajneesh contact Rajneeshdham Neo-Sannyas Commune. 17 Koregaon Park. Poona 411 001, MS. India.
In colophon: Copyright: Neo-Sannyas International.
In loving gratitude to Osho Rajneesh.
Introduction by Ma Dhyan Sagar (p. vi) & Robert H. Rimmer (pp. vii-xiii).
Discourses are here finished with: “Okay, Maneesha? Yes, Osho.”

This is his last book and thus rounding off Osho’s lifetime public discourses.

The final chapter of this book, Osho’s last discourse ‘Sammasati – The Last Word’ on 10.04.1989, was originally titled ‘The Awakening of the Buddha’, and intended to be the start of a new series. After the reading of the sutra, Osho (on audio and video) starts with “Friends, a new series beginning today: The Awakening of the Buddha. Before the sutras there are a few questions from the sannyasins…” This first sentence has been omitted from the books.

This series on Zen and Zen masters were including some Western writers on Zen.
From Table of Contents:
ol>

  • This Disappearance is Anatta. 20.02.1989. 43 pages.

/ol>
enjiku, Nan-yo, Tanka Tennen & D.T. Suzuki (Essays in Zen Buddhism, vols I-III).
ol start=”2″>

  • Let the Christian Ship Drown. 21.02.1989. 40 pages.

/ol>
eiko, Tanka Tennen & Thomas Merton (Mystics and Zen masters).
ol start=”3″>

  • To Wait, To Wait for Nothing. 02.04.1989. 25 pages.

/ol>
anka, Choro & Nyogen Senzaki and Paul Reps (Zen Flesh, Zen Bones).
ol start=”4″>

  • Freedom Not Licentiousness. 03.04.1989. 29 pages.

/ol>
anka, Sekito Osho & Alan Watts (The Way of Zen).
ol start=”5″>

  • The Sky of Completion. 04.04.1989. 18 pages.

/ol>
otetsu, Tanka Tennen & Hubert Benoit (The Suprime Doctrine).
ol start=”6″>

  • Chaos – The Very Nature of Existence. 05.04.1989. 16 pages.

/ol>
hoshi, Sekito, Sekishitsu & Fritjof Capra (The Tao of Physics).
ol start=”7″>

  • Mind Only Thinks, Meditation Lives. 06.04.1989. 19 pages.

/ol>
yozan, Sekishitsu & Wilhelm Reich (Listen, Little Man).
ol start=”8″>

  • Inscape – The Ultimate Annihilation. 07.04.1989. 27 pages.

/ol>
aiten & Philip Kapleau (The Three Pillars of Zen)
ol start=”9″>

  • Small Intervals of Light. 08.04.1989. 22 pages.

/ol>
horo & Nancy Wilson Ross (The World of Zen).
ol start=”10″>

  • The Less You Are, The More You Are. 09.04.1989. 18 pages.

/ol>
uibi, Shohei & Mantak Chia (Tao Yoga), Erich Fromm (Psychoanalysis and Zen
Buddhism).
ol start=”11″>

  • Sammasati – The Last Word. 10.04.1989. 24 pages.

/ol>
ozan, Ungan, Chu at Leh T’an & Gesta Ital, Karl Jaspers (Philosophy, vols I-III).

On flaps: “THE ZEN MANIFESTO is not for a particular type, it is for all – for men and for women, and for black and white, and for Hindu and Mohammedan, and for Christian and Buddhist. It does not matter what kind of conditioning you have been brought up in. Zen is simply a technique of entering into your veryness.
The entrance is so deep that nothing remains, and all is found.
IT IS TIME, ripe time for a Zen manifesto. The Western intelligentsia have become acquainted with Zen, have also fallen in love with Zen, but they are still trying to approach Zen from the mind. They have not yet come to the understanding that Zen has nothing to do with mind.
Its tremendous job is to get you out of the prison of mind. It is not an intellectual philosophy; it is not a philosophy at all. Nor is it a religion, because it has no fictions and no lies, no consolations.
It is a lion’s roar.
And the greatest thing that Zen has brought into the world is freedom from oneself.”

Comments on Rimmer’s Introduction, by Ma Dhyan Sagar, Editor:
“Robert Rimmer has written this introduction to the book, and in his covering letter he has said:
“Here’s the introduction to ‘The Zen Manifesto’. If the powers don’t like it, don’t want to use, or to change it anyway, modify, or correct it anyway… it’s okay with me.”
We have not changed a single word and we have not added anything to it; but that does not mean that Osho agrees with all that he says. Of course, He loved it all, and we think that Robert Rimmer would also like it that we have not changed it. Whether we agree or not, that is not the point. The introduction is beautiful. Ma Dhyan Sagar, Editor.” (p. vi)

Introduction by Robert Rimmer: ‘On the Road to Buddhahood or, Thoughts on The Zen Manifesto’. Excerpts:
“While Rajneesh has gradually come to the conclusion, emphasized in this book, and tells us in his discourse published in ‘Zen: All the Colors of the Rainbow’, that “Zen has taken the ultimate standpoint about man,” Rajneesh has never been to Japan where the Zen masters first began and, as Osho is now doing completely, tried to separate Zen from the Buddhist religion, or any religion. Rajneesh’s library of writings about Zen (listed in the Rajneesh Times, March 1989) and his discourses about Zen in this book will prove to you that he is the greatest living Zen master. But unlike Father Merton, who never realized his wish, Rajneesh has no need to go to Japan and live in a Zen monastery…
Sadly we live in a world where millions of people aren’t literate enough to read a book like this or even the daily newspaper. I want to emphasize the point because many readers may be unaware that, like most of his writings, ‘The Zen Manifesto’ was originally spoken by Rajneesh as he continues to explore every aspect of human beliefs and thinking in his lectures, discourses, and darshans (more private conversations). That any human being can pursue erudite philosophies so thoroughly in verbal form is an amazement in itself. You have to go back to Plato to discover similar abilities and these were dialogues. Rajneesh does it without an interlocutor…
One thing is certain. Most of Shree Rajneesh’s life is an open book which has been explored in great detail by believers and non-believers. If you have read the middle of the roaders like Frances Fitzgerald’s ‘Cities on a Hill’, or the nay sayer’s like Hugh Milne who in his book, Bhagwan the God that Failed’, reveals among other things that loving women have played a continuing role in Rajneesh’s life, you’ll have fun trying to reconcile the worldly realities of Rajneesh’s life with his search for nothing. Laughing, I dissent when, in this book, Osho tells me that by the time I’m fifty I can escape the bondage of my sex drives. No way, Osho. At seventy-two, although I no longer have the physical appearance to attract young females, as the guru of X-rated films, I still enjoy watching young people using their bodies and genitals in search of a moment of non-being. But at the same time I’m well aware that Rajneesh is showing me, and you who read this book a new kind of Zen, and Tao (the Way) for men and women of the 21st century.
I’m not quite sure whether Rajneesh would accept an honorary MBA from Harvard, he does make it abundantly clear in this book that he doesn’t want to become a member of any organization, including the American Academy of Humanists. In my essay, ‘Rajneesh, The Enlightened Humanist’ which appeared both in the Summer issue of Free Inquiry (a Humanist based American magazine that sponsors the Academy) and the Rajneesh Times (March 1989) (largely because of his book ‘The Greatest Challenge: The Golden Future’) I proposed that he should be elected to the Academy. Humanism, rejecting an omnipotent power is in one sense a Zen way of thinking, but without meditation or the recognition of non-being. Most Humanists are totally disinterested in the search, or recognition of non-being, nor would they accept Rajneesh’s playing with astrology and numerology (means to nothingness that I’m sure he’d reject as quickly as he does God). Since Rajneesh enjoys jokes I presume that he knows the one about the Indian guru who after many years of sitting in silence tells his acolytes to bring him a gold-plated screwdriver. When it finally arrives the Indian saint very slowly unscrews his naval and his asshole falls out…
Never mind, as an intellectual I’m still trying. When Rajneesh describes the joy of witnessing as he does in many pages of this book, I realize that what Abraham Maslow described as peak experiences, even extended sexual intercourse and the fleeing moment of orgasm, is a temporary form of the Zen experience. But with them, I have momentarily achieved buddhahood.
I’ve enjoyed my trip aboard ‘The Zen Manifesto’, and hope you will, too. If a million of us try to make the leap from intellect to non-being, at least some of the time, we can achieve Rajneesh’s mission “to change the world.”
Not the meek, but those who achieve buddhahood should inherit the earth. Okay Osho?” (pp. vii-xiii)

First discourse, ‘This Disappearance is Anatta’, 20.02.1989 pm. Opening words:
“FRIENDS,
It is time, ripe time for a Zen manifesto. The Western intelligentsia have become acquainted with Zen, have also fallen in love with Zen, but they are still trying to approach Zen from the mind. They have not yet come to the understanding that Zen has nothing to do with mind.
Its tremendous job is to get you out of the prison of mind. It is not an intellectual philosophy; it is not a philosophy at all. Nor is it a religion, because it has no fictions and no lies, no consolations.
It is a lion’s roar.
And the greatest thing that Zen has brought into the world is freedom from oneself.
All the religions have been talking about dropping your ego – but it is a very weird phenomenon: they want you to drop your ego, and the ego is just a shadow of God. God is the ego of the universe, and the ego is your personality. Just as God is the very center of existence according to religions, your ego is the center of your mind, of your personality. They have all been talking about dropping the ego, but it cannot be dropped unless God is dropped. You cannot drop a shadow or a reflection unless the source of its manifestation is destroyed.
So religions have been saying continuously for centuries, that you should get rid of the ego – but for wrong reasons. They have been asking you to drop your ego so you can surrender to God, so you can surrender to the priests, so you can surrender to any kind of nonsense, any kind of theology, superstition, belief system.
But you cannot drop the ego if it is a reflection of God. God is a lie, out there in the universe, and ego is a lie within your mind. Your mind is simply reflecting a bigger lie according to its size.
Religions put humanity in a great dilemma: they went on praising God, and they went on condemning the ego. So people were in a very split state, in a schizophrenic space. They tried hard to drop the ego, but the harder they tried, the harder it became to drop it – because who was going to drop it? The ego was trying to drop itself. That’s an impossibility. So even in the humblest so-called religious people, the ego becomes very subtle, but it is not dropped. You can see it in the eyes of your saints.” (p. 2)

Osho’s last discourse ever, ‘Sammasati – The Last Word’, on 10.04.1989 finishes with a joke on the two famous psychologists in Vienna, Doctor Sigfried Mind, and Doctor Krazy Karl Kong who decided to explore the mystery of death by traveling to Cairo and visit the pyramids. Confronted with the mummies in a golden huge coffin, Doctor Sigfried Mind is taken by surprise, “Mummy?” he screeches again. “Hey, this looks more like Daddy!”

The discourse is finished with a guided meditation in Gautama the Buddha Auditorium and Osho’s last words spoken in public:
“It is time Nivedano…
[Drumbeat, Gibberish and Let Go.
Then a final drumbeat]
Be silent… Close your eyes… and feel yourself completely frozen.
This is the right moment to enter inwards.
Gather all your energy, your total consciousness, and rush towards the inner center with deep intensity and urgency.
The center is just two inches below the navel, inside the body.
Faster… and faster… Deeper… and deeper…
As you come closer to the center of being, a great silence descends over you, and inside a peace, a blissfulness, a light that fills your whole interior. This is your original being. This is your buddha.
At this moment, witness that you are not the body, not the mind, not the heart, but just the pure witnessing self, the pure consciousness. This is your buddhahood, your hidden nature, your meeting with the universe.
These are your roots.
Relax…
Nivedano…
[Drumbeat, falling to the ground]
Relax… and just be a silent witness.
You start melting like ice in the ocean. Gautam the Buddha Auditorium becomes an oceanic field of consciousness. You are no longer separate – this is your oneness with existence.
To be one with existence is to be a buddha, it is your very nature. It is not a question of searching and finding, you are it, right now.
Gather all the flowers, the fragrance, the flame and the fire, the immeasurable, and bring it with you as you come back.
Nivedano…
[Drumbeat]
Come back peacefully, silently, as a buddha.
Just for a few seconds, close your eyes and remember the path and the source you have found, and the buddha nature that you have experienced.
This moment you are the most blessed people on the earth. Remembering yourself as a buddha is the most precious experience, because it is your eternity, it is your immortality.
It is not you, it is your very existence. You are one with the stars and the trees and the sky and the ocean. You are no longer separate.
The last word of Buddha was, sammasati.
Okay, Maneesha?
Yes, Osho.”
(Chapter 11)

Compilations & Special Editions. A Selection.

For a comprehensive listing of the numerous published compilations see www.sannyas.wiki / English Publications / Compilations.

* The ABC of Enlightenment. A Spiritual Dictionary for the Here and Now / Osho. London, Element, 2003. 218 pages. Hardcover.

* Art of Tea. Meditations to Awaken Your Spirit / Osho (et al.).
New York, St. Martin’s Press, 2001. 144 pages. Boxed set which includes a small book, teacups, bamboo mat and instructions.

* The Art of Enlightenment. The Pathless Path, the Gateless Gate / Osho. Inspiration: Sw Anand Arun. Compilation & Design: Sw Dhyan Yatri. Assistance: Sw Anand Suvam. Ma Bodhi Mudita. Sw Aatmo Neerav. Photographs: Ma Bodhi Chhaya. Sw Anand Arhat et al. Artwork: Sw Dhyan Passika. Design support: Sunder Basnet. Pawan Khadgi. Preface: Sw Anand Arun. Kathmandu, Osho Tatopan Publication, 2017. 403 pages. Lavishly illustrated with colorphotos, drawings and vignettes. Hardcover. Sources. Osho Centers. Osho Books. (100th Publication by Osho Tatopan).

* Beyond the Frontiers of the Mind / Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Compiled by David Rabe. Poona, Osho International, 1988. 110 pages. Paperback. Talks from 1974-1987.

* The Book. An Introduction to the Teachings of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Series I-III. Editing: Academy of Rajneeshism. Sw Krishna Prem. Introductions: Sw Dhyan John, Ma Mary Catherine and Ma Deva Sarito. Design: Ma Prem Tushita. Direction: Ma Yoga Pratima. Publisher: Ma Anand Sheela, Rajneesh Foundation International, Rajneeshpuram, March 1984. First Edition. Volume 1: Series I from A to H. Volume 2: Series II from I to Q. Volume 3: Series III from R to Z. 712+568+612, total 1.892 pages. Weight: 437+318+353 g. Paperbacks. 10,000 copies. ISBN 0-88050-702-0; 0-88050-703-9; 0-88050-704-7. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 84-42616. Price for each volume $4.95. Period and Subject: Excerpts from Discourses and Darshans in Poona One. Place: Buddha Hall and Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Poona.

* The Diamond Sword. Rediscovering the Forgotten Treasure of Meditation / Osho. Editing: Yoga Pratap Bharati,.a.o..Design: Sanjay. Publisher: A Rebel Book, Osho Multimedia, 2008. 240 pages. Hardcover. Talks from Mumbai and Manali, 1985-1986.

* Enlightenment is Your Nature. The Fundamental Difference Between Psychology, Therapy, and Meditation. Compilation of Osho’s Discourses. London, Watkings, 2017. 255 pages. Compilation of discourses composed around 2010.

* Es Gibt Utopia (There is Utopia) / Christoph Graf Keyserlingk (Swami Dharmabodhi). Translation and Design: Rolf Hannes. Illustrations: Ma Amiya. München, Midheaven Bookshop, 1988. 59 pages. Illustrated with b/w photo. HC in slipcase. (Edition Ekstasia 1988. New York), Limited edition of 342 hand signed copies. Interview with Osho 11.10.1985 in Sanai Grove. Text in German and English. Cat.A. (O) (Keyserlingk 1988)

* Gold Nuggets./ Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Editing and compilation: Sw devaraj and Ma Prem Maneesha. Rebel Publishing House, 1988. 185 pages.
Maneesha: We planned to compile a book of quotations taken from discourses given over the period of the whole world tour thus far. Bhagwan liked the idea and gave us a title for the book: ‘Gold Nuggets’. Perfect! That was exactly what the book would be – a gold mine of priceless pieces straight from the master’s mouth.

* The Great Challenge. A Rajneesh Reader / Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Editor: Hannelore Rosset. Introduction: Sw Krishna Prem. Grove Press, New York, 1982. 211 pages. Unbound. Talks from Woodlands, Bombay, 1970-1971.

* India My Love. Fragments of a Golden Past / Osho. Editing: Sw Satya Vedant and others. Photography: Sw Premgit. Sw Anand Surendra.. Ma deva Sarito. Rebel Publishing House, India, 1997, 189 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover.

* Life’s Mysteries. An Introduction to the Teachings of Osho. Compiled by Carol Neiman. New Delhi, Penguin Books India, 1995. 250 pages. Paperback. With an introduction (18 pages) by Khushwant Singh.

* Mojud. The Man With The Inexplicable Life. An ancient Sufi story with commentary by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Editor: Ma Antar Komalta. Conception: Ma Prem Kabira. Direction: Sw Anand Vibhavan. Sw Deva Anugito. Book Design: Sw Paritosh Dhyan. Illustrator: Ma Prem Pujan. Published by: Ansu Publishing Company, Inc., Portland, Oregon, 1988. 80 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Limited edition, 112 signed, numbered copies. First edition: 5,000 hard bound copies. Originally published in: Wisdom of the Sands (1978), vol II, ch. 1.

* More Gold Nuggets / Osho Rajneesh. Compilation, Editing and Introduction: Ma Deva Sarito. Rebel Publishing House, 1989. 181 pages. Hardcover. Talks from Bombay in 1986.

* New Man for the New Millennium / Osho. Edited and Compiled by Ma Deva Sarito. Assistance in Editing: Ma Kamaal. Coordinated by Sw Amano Manish. New Delhi, Penguin Books, 2000. 280 pages. Paperback.

* No Book. Composition and Design: Sw Baven, Sw Deva Yoshiro. Typesetting: Ma Prem Arya. Phorography: Sw Prashanta, Sw Swatantra, Sarjano, Ma Himani. Cover painting: Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto). Production: Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Cologne, The Rebel Publishing House, 1989. Pages not numbered. Hardcover. Pages and pages of emptiness bound in a pristine white cover with endpaper painted by Meera. Previously published as ‘The Rajneesh Nothing Book’ (1979 & 1982). 1979 edition: 200 blank pages to play with.

* No Book. The Book of the Books / Osho. Poona, Zorba Design, no year. Unnumbered pages. Hardcover. Exclusively reproduced limited number of copies for Osho centers, libraries, individual disciples and Osho lovers. With Video DVD: Drinking from an Empty Cup. A Taste of Pure Silence.

* The Orange Book. The Meditation Techniques of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh / Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Compilation and Editing: Sw Anand Veetmoha. Coordination: Ma Yoga Pratima. Ma Deva Ritambhara. Publisher: Rajneesh Foundation, 1980. 227 pages. Paperback. 5,000 copies.

* Osho: Meditation Goes Mainstream. 3rd edition. 1995. 315 pages. Press, Research and Osho.

* Pointing the Way / Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. Editor and Foreword:: Sw Krishna Prem. Published by Narendra Prakash Jain, for Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi, 1979. 249 pages. Hardcover. 178 fragments 1960-1966 translated from Hindi.

* The Rajneesh Nothing Book. An Invitation to create and celebrate. 200 blank pages to play with, for you to enjoy. Nothing to say, nothing to do – just lots of empty space and endless possibilities. Rajneesh Foundation, Poona, 1979. 200 pages. Idries Shah was the one who wrote an introduction and the history of handling over the holy book of the the Sufis’. Osho’s own empty bog: The Rajneesh Nothing Book (1979 & 1982), later edition entitled ‘No Book’ (1989).

* Rising in Love / Osho. Edited by Ma Deva Sarito & Mahasattva Ma Anand Savita. New Delhi, Fusion Books, 2009. 204 pages. Six discourses #13 to #18, previously published in Beyond Enlightenment (1986).

* Signatures on Water / Osho. Editing: Ma Deva Sarito. Design: Ma Dhyan Amiyo (German). Photography: Sw Satyamurti & Sw Puneet Bharti. Production: Sw Prem Prabhu. Typesetting: Ma Anand Disha. Printing: Parksons Printers, Bombay. Color separation: Reproscan, Bombay. Published by Rebel Publishing House, Pune, 1992. 352 pages. HC. With delicate nature pictures printed on tracing paper. Osho commenting on haikus. Also: Sandviks Bokforlag, Norway. Joint venture gift book. In Italian, French, German, Norwegian and Japanese. (as mentioned in: A Silent Explosion (OIF 1994))

* Words from a Man of No Words / Shree Rajneesh. Introduction: Ma Deva Sarito. Editing and Compilation: Ma Shantam Avirbhava. Ma Deva Sarito. Ma Dhyan Sagar. Photography: Sw Prem Visarjan. Printing: Mohndruck, Gütersloh. Publisher: The Rebel Publishing house, Cologne, 1989. 120 pages. Illustrated. Hardcover. Pocketsize. Taken from ‘The Rajneesh Bible’, vols 1-2.

* Work Is Love Made Visible. Translating an Enlightened Vision onto Action / Osho. Editing: Yoga Pratap. Satyam. Anando. Production: Kamaal. Osho Media International, 2011. 257 pages. Hardcover. Talks from meditation camps in Lonavala, Nargol, Mumbai and Matheran, 1967-1971.